References of "Sanchez-Lavega, A"
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See detailThe science case for an orbital mission to Uranus: Exploring the origins and evolution of ice giant planets
Arridge, C. S.; Achilleos, N.; Agarwal, J. et al

in Planetary and Space Science (2014), (0), -

Abstract Giant planets helped to shape the conditions we see in the Solar System today and they account for more than 99% of the mass of the Sun's planetary system. They can be subdivided into the Ice ... [more ▼]

Abstract Giant planets helped to shape the conditions we see in the Solar System today and they account for more than 99% of the mass of the Sun's planetary system. They can be subdivided into the Ice Giants (Uranus and Neptune) and the Gas Giants (Jupiter and Saturn), which differ from each other in a number of fundamental ways. Uranus, in particular is the most challenging to our understanding of planetary formation and evolution, with its large obliquity, low self-luminosity, highly asymmetrical internal field, and puzzling internal structure. Uranus also has a rich planetary system consisting of a system of inner natural satellites and complex ring system, five major natural icy satellites, a system of irregular moons with varied dynamical histories, and a highly asymmetrical magnetosphere. Voyager 2 is the only spacecraft to have explored Uranus, with a flyby in 1986, and no mission is currently planned to this enigmatic system. However, a mission to the uranian system would open a new window on the origin and evolution of the Solar System and would provide crucial information on a wide variety of physicochemical processes in our Solar System. These have clear implications for understanding exoplanetary systems. In this paper we describe the science case for an orbital mission to Uranus with an atmospheric entry probe to sample the composition and atmospheric physics in Uranus’ atmosphere. The characteristics of such an orbiter and a strawman scientific payload are described and we discuss the technical challenges for such a mission. This paper is based on a white paper submitted to the European Space Agency's call for science themes for its large-class mission programme in 2013. [less ▲]

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See detailVenus express: Highlights of the nominal mission
Titov, D. V.; Svedhem, H.; Taylor, F. W. et al

in Solar System Research (2009), 43

Venus Express is the first European (ESA) mission to the planet Venus. Its main science goal is to carry out a global survey of the atmosphere, the plasma environment, and the surface of Venus from orbit ... [more ▼]

Venus Express is the first European (ESA) mission to the planet Venus. Its main science goal is to carry out a global survey of the atmosphere, the plasma environment, and the surface of Venus from orbit. The payload consists of seven experiments. It includes a powerful suite of remote sensing imagers and spectrometers, instruments for in-situ investigation of the circumplanetary plasma and magnetic field, and a radio science experiment. The spacecraft, based on the Mars Express bus modified for the conditions at Venus, provides a versatile platform for nadir and limb observations as well as solar, stellar, and radio occultations. In April 2006 Venus Express was inserted in an elliptical polar orbit around Venus, with a pericentre height of Ë 250 km and apocentre distance of Ë 66000 km and an orbital period of 24 hours. The nominal mission lasted from June 4, 2006 till October 2, 2007, which corresponds to about two Venus sidereal days. Here we present an overview of the main results of the nominal mission, based on a set of papers recently published in Nature, Icarus, Planetary and Space Science, and Geophysical Research Letters. [less ▲]

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See detailOutreach goals of the Europa Jupiter System Mission
Blanc, M.; Coustenis; Nazé, Yaël ULg et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailMorphology and dynamics of Venus oxygen airglow from Venus Express/Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer observations
Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Piccioni, G. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Planets (2008), 113

Images obtained by the Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS)-M channel instrument onboard Venus Express have been used to retrieve maps and apparent motions of the O[SUB]2[/SUB] ([SUP ... [more ▼]

Images obtained by the Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS)-M channel instrument onboard Venus Express have been used to retrieve maps and apparent motions of the O[SUB]2[/SUB] ([SUP]1[/SUP]Delta) infrared nightglow on Venus at 1.27 mum. The nightglow distribution is highly inhomogeneous with the regions of brightest emission generally located at low latitudes near the midnight meridian. Unexpectedly some orbits show also intense airglow activity over the south polar region. The spatially resolved airglow is spectacularly variable not only in its morphology and intensity but also in the apparent motions of the airglow small- and large-scale structures. Visual tracking of the bright features allowed to obtain mean zonal and meridional motions related to the subsolar to antisolar circulation. The zonal velocity is dominated by an intense prograde jet (contrary to the retrograde planetary rotation) from dawn to midnight extending up to 22 hours in local time with lower velocities and reversed sign from dusk. Typical zonal velocities range between +60 (prograde) to -50 (retrograde) m/s, whereas most meridional velocities range from -20 (poleward) to +100 m/s (equatorward) with an average meridional circulation of +20 m/s toward low latitudes. The brightest small-scale (~100 km) features appear correlated with locations of apparent convergence which may be a signature of compression and downwelling, whereas this is not evident for the large-scale structures suggesting slow subsidence over large areas mixed with horizontal motions. We argue that part of the tracked motions are representative of real motions at the mesosphere over an altitude range of 95-107 km. [less ▲]

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See detailDistribution of the O[SUB]2[/SUB] infrared nightglow observed with VIRTIS on board Venus Express
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Saglam, Adem ULg; Piccioni, G. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2008), 35

We present characteristics of the statistical horizontal distribution of the O[SUB]2[/SUB] infrared nightglow over most of the southern hemisphere observed with the VIRTIS instrument over a period ... [more ▼]

We present characteristics of the statistical horizontal distribution of the O[SUB]2[/SUB] infrared nightglow over most of the southern hemisphere observed with the VIRTIS instrument over a period spanning nearly 11 months of low solar activity. We show that the distribution is inhomogeneous with the regions of brightest emission reaching ~3 MegaRayleighs (MR) located at low latitude near and dawnward of the midnight meridian. The hemispherically averaged nadir brightness is 1.3 MR, in very good agreement with earlier ground based observations. We show that the dayside supply of O atoms is sufficient to produce the observed global O[SUB]2[/SUB] nightglow if approximately 50% of the dayside O production is carried to the nightside by the subsolar to antisolar global circulation. Limb profiles observed at northern mid-latitudes exhibit large intensity variations over short time periods. Calculations with a one-dimensional chemical diffusive model produce an airglow peak at 96 km, in agreement with the limb observations. The atomic oxygen density derived from the best fits to O[SUB]2[/SUB] airglow limb profiles reaches a maximum of 1.8-3.5 × 10[SUP]11[/SUP] cm[SUP]-3[/SUP] at 104 km. [less ▲]

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See detailA dynamic upper atmosphere of Venus as revealed by VIRTIS on Venus Express
Drossart, P.; Piccioni, G.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Nature (2007), 450

The upper atmosphere of a planet is a transition region in which energy is transferred between the deeper atmosphere and outer space. Molecular emissions from the upper atmosphere (90-120 km altitude) of ... [more ▼]

The upper atmosphere of a planet is a transition region in which energy is transferred between the deeper atmosphere and outer space. Molecular emissions from the upper atmosphere (90-120 km altitude) of Venus can be used to investigate the energetics and to trace the circulation of this hitherto little-studied region. Previous spacecraft(1) and ground-based(2-4) observations of infrared emission from CO2, O-2 and NO have established that photochemical and dynamic activity controls the structure of the upper atmosphere of Venus. These data, however, have left unresolved the precise altitude of the emission(1) owing to a lack of data and of an adequate observing geometry(5,6). Here we report measurements of day-side CO2 non-local thermodynamic equilibrium emission at 4.3 mu m, extending from 90 to 120 km altitude, and of night-side O-2 emission extending from 95 to 100 km. The CO2 emission peak occurs at similar to 115 km and varies with solar zenith angle over a range of similar to 10 km. This confirms previous modelling(7), and permits the beginning of a systematic study of the variability of the emission. The O-2 peak emission happens at 96 km +/- 1 km, which is consistent with three-body recombination of oxygen atoms transported from the day side by a global thermospheric sub-solar to anti-solar circulation, as previously predicted(8). [less ▲]

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See detailThe Saturn Ring Plane Crossings: May and August 1995
Sicardy, B.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Colas, F. et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (1995, June 01)

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