References of "Samadi, Réza"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailNon-adiabatic study of the Kepler subgiant KIC 6442183
Grosjean, Mathieu ULg; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Belkacem, Kevin et al

in The Space Photometry Revolution CoRoT Symposium 3, Kepler KASC-7 joint meeting (in press)

Thanks to the precision of Kepler observations, [3] were able to measure the linewidth and amplitude of individual modes (including mixed modes) in several sub- giant power spectra. We perform a forward ... [more ▼]

Thanks to the precision of Kepler observations, [3] were able to measure the linewidth and amplitude of individual modes (including mixed modes) in several sub- giant power spectra. We perform a forward modelling of a Kepler subgiant based on sur- face properties and observed frequencies. Non-adiabatic computations including a time- dependent treatment of convection give the lifetimes of radial and non-radial modes. Next, combining the lifetimes and inertias with a stochastic excitation model gives the ampli- tudes of the modes. We can now directly compare theoretical and observed linewidths and amplitudes of mixed-modes to obtain new constraints on our theoretical models. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTheoretical power spectra of mixed modes in low-mass red giant stars
Grosjean, Mathieu ULg; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Belkacem, Kevin et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (in press)

CoRoT and Kepler observations of red giant stars revealed very rich spectra of non-radial solar-like oscillations. Of particular interest was the detection of mixed modes that exhibit significant ... [more ▼]

CoRoT and Kepler observations of red giant stars revealed very rich spectra of non-radial solar-like oscillations. Of particular interest was the detection of mixed modes that exhibit significant amplitude, both in the core and at the surface of the stars. It opens the possibility of probing the internal structure from their innermost layers up to their surface throughout their evolution on the red giant branch, as well as on the red clump. Our objective is primarily to provide physical insight into the mechanism responsible for mixed-mode amplitudes and lifetimes. Subsequently, we aim at understanding the evolution and structure of red-giant spectra along with their evolution. The study of energetic aspects of these oscillations is also important for predicting the mode parameters in the power spectrum. Non-adiabatic computations, including a time-dependent treatment of convection, are performed and provide the lifetimes of radial and non-radial mixed modes. We then combine these mode lifetimes and inertias with a stochastic excitation model that gives us their heights in the power spectra. For stars representative of CoRoT and Kepler observations, we show under which circumstances mixed modes have heights comparable to radial ones. We stress the importance of the radiative damping in determining the height of mixed modes. Finally, we derive an estimate for the height ratio between a g-type and a p-type mode. This can thus be used as a first estimate of the detectability of mixed modes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailNon-adiabatic study of the Kepler subgiant KIC 6442183
Grosjean, Mathieu ULg; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Belkacem, Kevin et al

Poster (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEnergetical aspects of solar-like oscillations in red giants
Grosjean, Mathieu ULg; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Belkacem, Kevin et al

Conference (2013, December)

CoRoT and Kepler observations of red giants reveal very rich spectra of non-radial solar- like oscillations allowing us to probe their internal structure. The study of energetic aspects of these ... [more ▼]

CoRoT and Kepler observations of red giants reveal very rich spectra of non-radial solar- like oscillations allowing us to probe their internal structure. The study of energetic aspects of these oscillations is of great importance to predict the peak parameters in the power spectrum. The theoretical determination of lifetimes (or equivalently width) of the modes require non- adiabatic computations. Next, combined with a stochastic excitation model, we can also predict the height of the mode and finally obtain theoretical power spectra. Comparison between our theoretical predictions with observations give important constraint on red-giants models. Lifetimes and amplitudes of modes trapped in the envelope (e.g. radial modes) constrain the characteristics of the convective envelope and its time-dependent interaction with oscillations. Lifetimes of mixed-modes (mainly dipolar modes) strongly depend on mode trapping, allowing us to probe the core of red-giants. I will discuss under which circumstances mixed modes are detectable for a large variety of red-giant stellar models, with emphasis on the effect of the evolutionary status of the star (along the red-giant branch and during the He-burning phase) for a wide range of stellar masses (from 0.7 to 4 Msun ) on theoretical power spectra. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEvolution of the theoretical power spectrum of solar-like oscillations along the ascending phase on the red giant branch.
Grosjean, Mathieu ULg; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Belkacem, Kevin et al

in Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series (2013, December), 479

CoRoT and Kepler observations of red giants reveal rich spectra of non-radial solar-like oscillations allowing to probe their internal structure. An important question comes from the observation of mixed ... [more ▼]

CoRoT and Kepler observations of red giants reveal rich spectra of non-radial solar-like oscillations allowing to probe their internal structure. An important question comes from the observation of mixed modes : When during the star’s ascension on the RGB are mixed-modes more likely to be detectable ? We follow the evolution of a star on the RGB and investigate the effect of its ascension on theoretical power spectrum. Equilibrium models (computed with the code ATON) represent four different stages of a star on the RGB. The mass of the star (1.5M") is in the typical mass range of stars observed by CoRoT and Kepler. We used a non-radial non-adiabatic code to compute the theoretical solar-like oscillations of these models. An important output of these calculations is the theoretical lifetimes of the modes. Then we computed the oscillation amplitudes through a stochastic excitation model. These computations allow us to draw theoretical power spectrum and discuss the possibility to observe mixed-modes at different evolutionary stages on the RGB. We found that structure modifications in a star ascending the RGB have an important impact on theoretical power spectrum of solar-like oscillations. Efficiencies of trapping and lifetimes of mixed modes are indeed strongly affected by this evolution. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailEvolution of the theoretical power spectrum of solar-like oscillations along the ascending phase on the red giant branch.
Grosjean, Mathieu ULg; Montalban Iglesias, Josefa ULg; Samadi, Reza et al

Poster (2012, November)

CoRoT and Kepler observations of red giants reveal rich spectra of non-radial solar-like oscillations allowing to probe their internal structure. An important question comes from the observation of mixed ... [more ▼]

CoRoT and Kepler observations of red giants reveal rich spectra of non-radial solar-like oscillations allowing to probe their internal structure. An important question comes from the observation of mixed modes : When during the star’s ascension on the RGB are mixed-modes more likely to be detectable ? We follow the evolution of a star on the RGB and investigate the effect of its ascension on theoretical power spectrum. Equilibrium models (computed with the code ATON) represent four different stages of a star on the RGB. The mass of the star (1.5M") is in the typical mass range of stars observed by CoRoT and Kepler. We used a non-radial non-adiabatic code to compute the theoretical solar-like oscillations of these models. An important output of these calculations is the theoretical lifetimes of the modes. Then we computed the oscillation amplitudes through a stochastic excitation model. These computations allow us to draw theoretical power spectrum and discuss the possibility to observe mixed-modes at different evolutionary stages on the RGB. We found that structure modifications in a star ascending the RGB have an important impact on theoretical power spectrum of solar-like oscillations. Efficiencies of trapping and lifetimes of mixed modes are indeed strongly affected by this evolution. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailNon-radial, non-adiabatic solar-like oscillations in RGB and HB stars
Grosjean, Mathieu ULg; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Belkacem, Kevin et al

Poster (2012, July)

Corot and Kepler observations of red giants reveal rich spectra of non-radial solar-like oscillations allowing to probe their internal structure. We compare the theoretical spectrum (amplitudes and life ... [more ▼]

Corot and Kepler observations of red giants reveal rich spectra of non-radial solar-like oscillations allowing to probe their internal structure. We compare the theoretical spectrum (amplitudes and life- times) of two red giants in the same region of the HR diagram but in different evolutionary phases. The lifetimes are obtained by computing theoretical non-adiabatic non-radial solar-like oscillations for mixed modes in the two models. Thanks to this, we have been able to compute the oscillation amplitudes through a stochastic excitation model. We present here our first results on the inertia, damping rates and amplitudes of the oscillations in the two stars and discuss the trapping, the visibilities and the am- plitudes of the different modes. The differences in the spectra of the two stars are also investigated. As already known, the period spacings in the two models are very different. Moreover, we find significant differences in amplitudes and lifetimes between the two models. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCoRoT opens a new era in hot B subdwarf asteroseismology. Detection of multiple g-mode oscillations in KPD 0629-0016
Charpinet, Stéphane; Green, Elizabeth M.; Baglin, Annie et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 516

Context. The asteroseismic exploitation of long period, g-mode hot B subdwarf (sdB) pulsators has been a long sought objective undermined, thus far, by the difficulty of obtaining sufficiently precise and ... [more ▼]

Context. The asteroseismic exploitation of long period, g-mode hot B subdwarf (sdB) pulsators has been a long sought objective undermined, thus far, by the difficulty of obtaining sufficiently precise and continuous time series data from the ground. Aims: Fast photometry from space appears to be the only means of gathering the appropriate asteroseismic data for this type of star. We explore this possibility with the CoRoT (COnvection, ROtation, and planetary Transits) satellite. Methods: We obtained ~24 days of high quality, nearly continuous photometric data with CoRoT during a short run (SRa03) dedicated to the long period sdB pulsator KPD 0629-0016. We analysed the frequency (period) content of the CoRoT time series by combining Fourier analysis, nonlinear least squares fitting, and prewhitening techniques. Results: Our study has led to the detection of a large number of g-mode pulsations in KPD 0629-0016, with 17 frequencies clearly identified in addition to 7 possible (although more uncertain) peaks emerging above the mean noise level (estimated at ~57 ppm). This is more than is typically detected for sdB stars from the ground and, more importantly, the frequencies of all uncovered g-modes are, for the first time, reliably measured. This paves the way for a detailed asteroseismic analysis of this star. The oscillations are found in the 90-400 μHz frequency range with a dominant mode at 205.29 μHz (P = 1.353 h) of amplitude 0.246% of the mean brightness, i.e., typical of mid-radial order g-mode pulsations. Conclusions: These photometric observations of KPD 0629-0016 demonstrate that g-mode sdB pulsators have rich oscillation spectra that are accessible to current space-based facilities. CoRoT opens up a new era in asteroseismology of hot B subdwarf stars. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRed-giant seismic properties analyzed with CoRoT
Mosser, Benoit; Belkacem, Kevin ULg; Goupil, Marie Jo et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 517

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe red-giant CoRoT target HR 7349
Carrier, Fabien; Morel, Thierry ULg; Miglio, Andrea ULg et al

in Astrophysics & Space Science (2010), 328

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTheoretical amplitudes and lifetimes of non-radial solar-like oscillations in red giants
Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Belkacem, Kevin ULg; Samadi, Réza et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

Context: Solar-like oscillations have been observed in numerous red giants from ground and from space. An important question arises: could we expect to detect non-radial modes probing the internal ... [more ▼]

Context: Solar-like oscillations have been observed in numerous red giants from ground and from space. An important question arises: could we expect to detect non-radial modes probing the internal structure of these stars? <BR />Aims: We investigate under what physical circumstances non-radial modes could be observable in red giants; what would be their amplitudes, lifetimes and heights in the power spectrum (PS)? <BR />Methods: Using a non-radial non-adiabatic pulsation code including a non-local time-dependent treatment of convection, we compute the theoretical lifetimes of radial and non-radial modes in several red giant models. Next, using a stochastic excitation model, we compute the amplitudes of these modes and their heights in the PS. <BR />Results: Distinct cases appear. Case A corresponds to subgiants and stars at the bottom of the ascending giant branch. Our results show that the lifetimes of the modes are mainly proportional to the inertia I, which is modulated by the mode trapping. The predicted amplitudes are lower for non-radial modes. But the height of the peaks in the PS are of the same order for radial and non-radial modes as long as they can be resolved. The resulting frequency spectrum is complex. Case B corresponds to intermediate models in the red giant branch. In these models, the radiative damping becomes high enough to destroy the non-radial modes trapped in the core. Hence, only modes trapped in the envelope have significant heights in the PS and could be observed. The resulting frequency spectrum of detectable modes is regular for â =0 and 2, but a little more complex for â =1 modes because of less efficient trapping. Case C corresponds to models of even higher luminosity. In these models the radiative damping of non-radial modes is even larger than in the previous case and only radial and non-radial modes completely trapped in the envelope could be observed. The frequency pattern is very regular for these stars. The comparison between the predictions for radial and non-radial modes is very different if we consider the heights in the PS instead of the amplitudes. This is important as the heights (not the amplitudes) are used as detection criterion. CIFIST Marie Curie Excellence Team. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCoRoT Measures Solar-Like Oscillations and Granulation in Stars Hotter Than the Sun
Michel, Eric; Baglin, Annie; Auvergne, Michel et al

in Science (2008), 322

Oscillations of the Sun have been used to understand its interior structure. The extension of similar studies to more distant stars has raised many difficulties despite the strong efforts of the ... [more ▼]

Oscillations of the Sun have been used to understand its interior structure. The extension of similar studies to more distant stars has raised many difficulties despite the strong efforts of the international community over the past decades. The CoRoT (Convection Rotation and Planetary Transits) satellite, launched in December 2006, has now measured oscillations and the stellar granulation signature in three main sequence stars that are noticeably hotter than the sun. The oscillation amplitudes are about 1.5 times as large as those in the Sun; the stellar granulation is up to three times as high. The stellar amplitudes are about 25% below the theoretic values, providing a measurement of the nonadiabaticity of the process ruling the oscillations in the outer layers of the stars. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (6 ULg)