References of "Salleron, Julia"
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See detailAnti-TNF Monotherapy for Crohn's Disease: a 13-year Multicentre Experience.
Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Salleron, Julia; Filippi, Jerome et al

in Journal of Crohn's and Colitis [=JCC] (2016), 10(5), 516-24

BACKGROUND: Anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] therapy in combination with thiopurine is the most effective strategy for Crohn's disease, but raises safety concerns. METHODS: In a retrospective multicentre ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] therapy in combination with thiopurine is the most effective strategy for Crohn's disease, but raises safety concerns. METHODS: In a retrospective multicentre study, we investigated long-term outcome of patients starting anti-TNF monotherapy for Crohn's disease and investigated whether introducing an immunomodulator in patients losing response to anti-TNF monotherapy is effective for resetting immunogenicity. RESULTS: A total of 350 adult patients with Crohn's disease received either infliximab [n = 178, 51%] or adalimumab [n = 172, 49%] monotherapy. Mean duration of follow-up was 42 months. An immunomodulator was initiated in 53 patients [15%]. At last follow-up, 73.1% [n = 38] were in clinical remission [one patient with missing data]. Multivariate analysis identified anti-TNF type [higher need for starting immunomodulator for infliximab than for adalimumab; p = 0.0058] and first- vs second-/third-/fourth-line anti-TNF therapy [p = 0.014] as predictors of immunomodulator initiation. Among the 18 patients with available data, introduction of an immunomodulator was able to restore infliximab trough level within the therapeutic range and to induce clinical remission in 10 patients [55%]. Cumulative probability of remaining on anti-TNF therapy was 57.9% at 5 years among the 297 patients not starting an immunomodulator during follow-up. CONCLUSION: An immunomodulator was initiated in 15% of patients with Crohn's disease starting anti-TNF monotherapy. Independent predictors of immunomodulator initiation were infliximab use and second-/third-/fourth-line anti-TNF therapy. Resetting immunogenicity with an immunomodulator was effective in half of patients in a sub-study. Persistence of anti-TNF treatment at 5 years was observed in half of the 297 patients not starting an immumodulator in a real-life setting. [less ▲]

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See detailH1N1 vaccines in a large observational cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel disease treated with immunomodulators and biological therapy.
Rahier, Jean-Francois; Papay, Pavol; Salleron, Julia et al

in Gut (2011), 60(4), 456-62

BACKGROUND: Safety data are lacking on influenza vaccination in general and on A (H1N1)v vaccination in particular in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) receiving immmunomodulators and/or ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Safety data are lacking on influenza vaccination in general and on A (H1N1)v vaccination in particular in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) receiving immmunomodulators and/or biological therapy. AIMS AND METHODS: The authors conducted a multicentre observational cohort study to evaluate symptoms associated with influenza H1N1 adjuvanted (Pandemrix, Focetria, FluvalP) and non-adjuvanted (Celvapan) vaccines and to assess the risk of flare of IBD after vaccination. Patients with stable IBD treated with immunomodulators and/or biological therapy were recruited from November 2009 until March 2010 in 12 European countries. Harvey-Bradshaw Index and Partial Mayo Score were used to assess disease activity before and 4 weeks after vaccination in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Vaccination-related events up to 7 days after vaccination were recorded. RESULTS: Of 575 patients enrolled (407 CD, 159 UC and nine indeterminate colitis; 53.9% female; mean age 40.3 years, SD 13.9), local and systemic symptoms were reported by 34.6% and 15.5% of patients, respectively. The most common local and systemic reactions were pain in 32.8% and fatigue in 6.1% of subjects. Local symptoms were more common with adjuvanted (39.3%) than non-adjuvanted (3.9%) vaccines (p < 0.0001), whereas rates of systemic symptoms were similar with both types (15.0% vs 18.4%, p = 0.44). Among the adjuvanted group, Pandemrix more often induced local reactions than FluvalP and Focetria (51.2% vs 27.6% and 15.4%, p < 0.0001). Solicited adverse events were not associated with any patient characteristics, specific immunomodulatory treatment, or biological therapy. Four weeks after vaccination, absence of flare was observed in 377 patients with CD (96.7%) and 151 with UC (95.6%). CONCLUSION: Influenza A (H1N1)v vaccines are well tolerated in patients with IBD. Non-adjuvanted vaccines are associated with fewer local reactions. The risk of IBD flare is probably not increased after H1N1 vaccination. [less ▲]

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