References of "Saegerman, Claude"
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See detailMicrobiological zoonotic emerging risks, transmitted between livestock animals and humans (2007-2015)
Filippitzi, ME; Goumperis, T; Robinson, T et al

in Transboundary and emerging diseases (in press)

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See detailImproving laboratory diagnostic efficiency of epizootic diseases in Belgium
Cargnel, Mickaël ULg; Roelandt, Sophie; Van der Stede, Yves et al

Poster (2016, March)

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See detailRisk factors and effect of selective removal on retroviral infections prevalence in Belgian stray cats.
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Jolly, Sandra ULg; Dive, M. et al

in The Veterinary record (2016), 178(2), 45

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of several risk/protective factors and predictors on the prevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infections in ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of several risk/protective factors and predictors on the prevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infections in 302 stray cats captured during a trap-neuter-release programme in a mixed urban-rural area from Belgium, from 2010 to 2012. The impact of selective removal of FIV-positive cats on the apparent prevalence in the remaining population over this three-year period was also assessed. The seroprevalences over three years were 18.8 per cent for FIV and 0.7 per cent for FeLV. For FIV, the seroprevalence decreased significantly from the first year of the programme (2010; 30.5 per cent) to the last (2012; 13.1 per cent). Sex (male) and age (adult and old cats) were risk factors, while the year of sampling (years 2011 and 2012) was a protective factor. Age, sex and location were the most relevant predictors of FIV status. The data presented in this study revealed a very high FIV seroprevalence in Belgian stray cats, while FeLV was almost absent. The selective removal of positive cats had a drastic effect on the FIV seroprevalence in the remaining cat population. [less ▲]

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See detailStakeholders’ perceptions, attitudes and practices towards risk prevention in the food chain
Lupo, C; Wilmart, O; Van Huffel, X et al

in Food Control (2016), 66

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See detailClinical sentinel surveillance of equine West Nile fever, Spain
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Alba-Casals, A; Garcia-Bocanegra, I et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2016), 63(2), 184-193

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See detailGenotyping and strain distribution of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis isolated from humans and pigs in Belgium, 2011-2013
Vluggen, C; Soetaert, K; Duytschaever, L et al

in Eurosurveillance (2016), 21(3), 18-25

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See detailReconstruction of the Schmallenberg virus epidemic in Belgium: Complementary use of disease surveillance approaches
Poskin, A; Theron, Léonard ULg; Hanon, JB et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2016), 183

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See detailEpidemiology and Diagnosis of Q Fever in Animals and Humans in the 21st Century
Mainil, Jacques ULg; Monseur, Christine ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015, November 13)

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See detailBovine blood biomarkers as a way of processed animal proteins detection in feedingstuffs
Lecrenier, Marie-Caroline ULg; Marbaix, Hélène; Veys, Pascal et al

Poster (2015, November)

The prohibition of using animal by-products in feedingstuffs depends on two factors: their nature defined by the tissue/cell type and the species of origin, and on their destination (pets, fur animals or ... [more ▼]

The prohibition of using animal by-products in feedingstuffs depends on two factors: their nature defined by the tissue/cell type and the species of origin, and on their destination (pets, fur animals or other farmed animals). Proteomics is particularly well-suited to the purpose of PAPs detection as it is a tissue and species-specific method. The aim of this study was the identification and the selection of specific peptide biomarkers using tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of bovine blood products and blood meals in animal feed. Twenty-nine samples of blood meals and blood products (plasma or haemoglobin powder) of porcine, poultry and bovine origin as well as three milk products and two fish meals were analysed using a Q TOF mass spectrometer. Vegetal feed samples adulterated with 1% or 10% of bovine plasma powder, haemoglobin powder or blood meal were also analysed to evaluate the applicability of the method. Four proteins of interest were highlighted: Alpha-2-macroglobulin, apolipoprotein A-1, serotransferrin and haemoglobin (α and β chains). From these proteins, sixteen peptides were identified as potential bovine blood biomarkers in feedingstuffs. Nine of them could be used for the detection of plasma powder and seven of them for haemoglobin powder or blood meal. The evaluation of these peptides by a search against NCBInr database revealed that some of them could also be used to detect other ruminant bloods such as ovine or caprine ones. These preliminary results are promising. Efforts are now focused to improve the protocol in order to increase the sensitivity of the method as regards the selected proteins. [less ▲]

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See detailBelgian Wildlife as Potential Zoonotic Reservoir of Hepatitis E virus
Thiry, Damien ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2015)

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See detailImproving laboratory diagnostic capacity of epizootic diseases in Belgium
Cargnel, Mickaël ULg; Roelandt, Sophie; Van der Stede, Yves et al

Poster (2015, October 30)

Belgium and other European neighbouring countries faced several emerging and re-emerging diseases as well as zoonotic diseases over the last decade. However, it has been noticed that during these episodes ... [more ▼]

Belgium and other European neighbouring countries faced several emerging and re-emerging diseases as well as zoonotic diseases over the last decade. However, it has been noticed that during these episodes, the laboratory diagnostic capabilities were surpassed, which led to an increase in the time required for the control and the eradication of these diseases. Belgium is a European hub and can be affected by these diseases which can via different paths e.g. trade of live animals or animal products from around the world or via wildlife. It is therefore crucial to react rapidly to these diseases, to establish contingency plans and to develop appropriate diagnostic tests. Moreover, there are only few publications looking at the issues of increased diagnostic capacities for epizootic diseases based on [less ▲]

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See detailApplying participatory approaches in the evaluation of surveillance systems: A pilot study on African swine fever surveillance in Corsica.
Calba, Clémentine; Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Charrier, François et al

in Preventive Veterinary Medicine (2015)

The implementation of regular and relevant evaluations of surveillance systems is critical in improving their effectiveness and their relevance whilst limiting their cost. The complex nature of these ... [more ▼]

The implementation of regular and relevant evaluations of surveillance systems is critical in improving their effectiveness and their relevance whilst limiting their cost. The complex nature of these systems and the variable contexts in which they are implemented call for the development of flexible evaluation tools. Within this scope, participatory tools have been developed and implemented for the African swine fever (ASF) surveillance system in Corsica (France). The objectives of this pilot study were, firstly, to assess the applicability of participatory approaches within a developed environment involving various stakeholders and, secondly, to define and test methods developed to assess evaluation attributes. Two evaluation attributes were targeted: the acceptability of the surveillance system and its the non-monetary benefits. Individual semi-structured interviews and focus groups were implemented with representatives from every level of the system. Diagramming and scoring tools were used to assess the different elements that compose the definition of acceptability. A contingent valuation method, associated with proportional piling, was used to assess the non-monetary benefits, i.e., the value of sanitary information. Sixteen stakeholders were involved in the process, through 3 focus groups and 8 individual semi-structured interviews. Stakeholders were selected according to their role in the system and to their availability. Results highlighted a moderate acceptability of the system for farmers and hunters and a high acceptability for other representatives (e.g., private veterinarians, local laboratories). Out of the 5 farmers involved in assessing the non-monetary benefits, 3 were interested in sanitary information on ASF. The data collected via participatory approaches enable relevant recommendations to be made, based on the Corsican context, to improve the current surveillance system. [less ▲]

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See detailCurrent status of fasciolosis in Vietnam: an update and perspectives
Bui Thi, Dung ULg; Pham, Ngoc Doanh; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Journal of Helminthology (2015)

Vietnam is recognized as endemic for fasciolosis. However, most of the available publications have not been published in international journals. This review is based on national and international ... [more ▼]

Vietnam is recognized as endemic for fasciolosis. However, most of the available publications have not been published in international journals. This review is based on national and international Vietnamese publications and highlights the current status of fasciolosis in Vietnam. It also provides some information available in neighboring countries. Updated data on responsible species, distribution, transmission and control aspects, are summarized. The Central region of Vietnam is reported as being highly endemic for fasciolosis with a high number of human patients (more than 20.000 in 2011). Fasciola gigantica is reported as the main species in Vietnam. However, hybrids between F. gigantica and F. hepatica were identified. Both human and animals are infected by the ingestion of raw vegetables and possibly contaminated drinking water. Three lymnaeid snail species (Austropeplea viridis, Radix auricularia, Radix rubiginosa) may act as intermediate host of Fasciola spp. However due to the likely misidentification of snail species and cercariae during the previous decade the critical analysis of published data is difficult. A better understanding of transmission aspects of fasciolosis would allow the implementation of preventive measures of this important neglected zoonotic disease. [less ▲]

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See detailOrbivirus screening on dried blood spots from captive oryx in United Arab Emirates stresses the importance of pre-import measures
Martinelle, Ludovic ULg; Haegeman, Andy; Lignereux, Louis et al

Poster (2015, September 01)

Objective: Following reintroduction and conservation programs of the Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) and the scimitar horned oryx (SHO, Oryx dammah) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), import of animals from ... [more ▼]

Objective: Following reintroduction and conservation programs of the Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) and the scimitar horned oryx (SHO, Oryx dammah) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), import of animals from wild game ranches in the United States of America (USA) is not uncommon. Bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) are orbiviruses that are the causative agents of bluetongue disease (BT) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD), respectively. BTV and EHDV are endemic in the UAE and the USA. Sheep and some wild ruminant species are usually severely affected by BT whereas EHD mostly affects wild animals and sometimes cattle. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of these orbiviruses in Arabian and SHO from captive herds in the UAE using serology and molecular virology. Dry blood spot sampling for orbivirus screening is also discussed. Methods: A total of 175 SHO and 16 Arabian oryx were sampled. The latters were imported from Texas (USA) two weeks before sampling. All sampled animals belonged to captive herds spread over the Al Wathba area. For biosecurity reasons and to simplify blood storage, elutes from dried blood spot were used for serological and virological tests. Drops of about 80 µl of blood were dispensed on Whatman protein saver cards, and then allowed to dry in the dark at room temperature for 48 hours. Blood spots were punched out in paper discs with a 6 mm diameter punch and diluted in 250 µl PBS and Tween 20 0.05%. Eluted samples were incubated overnight at room temperature and then used immediately or stored at -80°C. To assess the most suitable ELISA kit to detect anti-BTV antibodies from the oryx discs, similar discs were prepared using blood issued from BTV seropositive and viremic as well as seronegative and non-viremic cattle. Elutes from discs with dried-blood from cattle were tested by BTV competitive ELISA (cELISA), sandwich ELISA (sELISA) and indirect ELISA (iELISA) and compared to cELISA performed directly on the serum of the same animals. iELISA on cattle paper discs gave the best correspondence with cELISA on cattle serum and was therefore used to test the oryx paper discs. Subsequently oryx paper discs were tested to detect antibodies against EHDV by cELISA. All the paper discs elutes from Arabian oryx and ELISA positive elutes from SHO were also tested by pan-BTV RTqPCR targeting a fragment of BTV segment 5 and detecting all BTV serotypes. Serotype specific end-point RT-PCR targeting a fragment of segment 2 of BTV2, BTV8, BTV10, BTV11, BTV13 and BTV17 were performed on pan-BTV positive samples. Results: Three out of 175 SHO and eight out of 16 Arabian oryx were found BTV seropositive by iELISA. None of the animals could be found seropositive against EHDV. BTV genome was detected in 1/3 seropositive SHO and in 5/16 of the Arabian oryx, amongst those 2/5 were seronegative. Overall Cq values were high (33-39). End point PCR failed to detect positive samples for any of the tested serotypes. Conclusion: BTV seroprevalence and RNA detection in SHO was very limited. By contrast BTV could be demonstrated in 5/16 imported Arabian oryx by molecular virology and in 8/16 by serology. The sampling was realized two weeks after the animals arrived in UAE and some oryx were viremic and seronegative, possibly suggesting a recent infection. Among the local SHO a low BTV seroprevalence was observed (3/175) and no animals were found positive to EHDV. This result was quite surprising because previous studies showed a higher BTV seroprevalence in domestic and wild ruminants of the Arabian Peninsula with wide local variations. In addition, dried blood spot testing has been demonstrated being a convenient and reliable method of sampling when storage conditions are hazardous. BTV serotypes could not be determined by end-point RT-PCR. At least 15 different BTV serotypes were reported in the USA and at least 10 in the Middle East, thus the oryx could be infected by a serotype not tested so far. Since RTqPCR positive values were high, the sensitivity of end-point RT-PCR might be insufficient to detect BTV out of eluted blood spots. Additional testing will be performed to identify the virus on the serotype level and therefore provide new insights to clarify the origin of the infection of the oryx. These results stress the need for pre-import risk assessment, precaution and implementation of biosecurity measures when considering translocation of wild ruminant species susceptible to BTV and EHDV. [less ▲]

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See detailNew insight in lymnaeid snails (Mollusca, Gastropoda) as intermediate hosts of Fasciola hepatica (Trematoda, Digenea) in Ecuador
Caron, Yannick ULg; Celi-Erazo, Maritza; Hurtrez-Boussès, Sylvie et al

Conference (2015, August)

Fasciolosis is a widely distributed disease in livestock in South America but knowledge about the epidemiology and the intermediate hosts are scarce in Ecuador. During 3 months, lymnaeid snails were ... [more ▼]

Fasciolosis is a widely distributed disease in livestock in South America but knowledge about the epidemiology and the intermediate hosts are scarce in Ecuador. During 3 months, lymnaeid snails were sampled (n=1482) in Pichincha province in two sites located in a highly endemic area. The snails were identified (based on morphology and ITS2 sequences) and the infection status was established through microscopic dissection and a multiplex PCR-based technique. If morphologic-based techniques were not useful to accurately named the one species collected, alignment study ascribed it to L. schirazensis. Rediae were observed in 1.75 % (26/1482) and Fasciola sp. DNA was detected in 6% (89/1482) of the collected snails. The COX1 region permitted the parasite species identification: F. hepatica. The relative sensitivity and specificity of the microscope related to the PCR results was 25.84% and 99.78% respectively. The mean size of the snails recorded positive for F. hepatica through crushing and microscopy was significantly higher than the mean size of negative snails. There was not such difference in PCR positive snails. The role of G. schirazensis as an intermediate host of F. hepatica in Ecuador is discussed and a hypothesis of an adaptation of the snail to the trematoda is formulated. For the first time, an epidemiological survey, based on molecular biology-based techniques assessed the role of lymnaeid snail in the epidemiology of fasciolosis in Ecuador. [less ▲]

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See detailHow to Assess Data Availability, Accessibility and Format for Risk Analysis?
Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Vandeputte, Sébastien; Mignot, Clémence et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2015), doi: 10.1111/tbed.12328

Risk assessments are mostly carried out based on available data, which do not reflect all data theoretically required by experts to answer them. This study aimed at developing a methodology to assess data ... [more ▼]

Risk assessments are mostly carried out based on available data, which do not reflect all data theoretically required by experts to answer them. This study aimed at developing a methodology to assess data availability, accessibility and format, based on a scoring system and focusing on two diseases: Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis (VEE), still exotic to Europe, and alveolar echinococcosis, caused by Echinococcus multilocularis (EM), endemic in several Member States (MSs). After reviewing 36 opinions of the EFSA-AHAW Panel on risk assessment of animal health questions, a generic list of needed data was elaborated. The methodology consisted, first, in implementing a direct and an indirect survey to collect the data needed for both case studies: the direct survey consisted in a questionnaire sent to contact points of three European MSs (Belgium, France and the Netherlands), and the organization of a workshop gathering experts on both diseases. The indirect survey, focusing on the three MSs involved in the direct survey plus Spain, relied on web searches. Secondly, a scoring system with reference to data availability, accessibility and format was elaborated, to, finally, compare both diseases and data between MSs. The accessibility of data was generally related to their availability. Web searches resulted in more data available for VEE compared to EM, despite its current exotic status in the European Union. Hypertext markup language and portable document files were the main formats of available data. Data availability, accessibility and format should be improved for research scientists/assessors. The format of data plays a key role in the feasibility and rapidness of data management and analysis, through a prompt compilation, combination and aggregation in working databases. Harmonization of data collection process is encouraged, according to standardized procedures, to provide useful and reliable data, both at the national and the international levels for both animal and human health; it would allow assessing data gaps through comparative studies. The present methodology is a good way of assessing the relevance of data for risk assessment, as it allows integrating the uncertainty linked to the quality of data used. Such an approach could be described as transparent and traceable and should be performed systematically. [less ▲]

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See detailLaboratory findings suggesting an association between BoHV-4 and bovine abortions in southern Belgium
Delooz, L; Czaplicki, G; Houtain, JY et al

Poster (2015)

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See detailA retrospective study on Equine Herpes Virus type-1 associated myeloencephalopathy in France (2008-2011)
van Galen, G; Leblond, A; Tritz, P et al

Poster (2015)

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