References of "SMITZ, Simon"
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See detailAnalyse des caractéristiques biopsychosociales observées chez 1 832 patients consultant pour des douleurs chroniques dans le service d'algologie du CHU de Liège
Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Blavier, Adelaïde ULg; PALMARICCIOTTI, Valérie ULg et al

in Douleur et Analgésie (2014)

This article aims to establish a "profile" of patients presenting with chronic pain in the algology service of CHU of Liège to identify possible relationships between diagnoses, psychological states and ... [more ▼]

This article aims to establish a "profile" of patients presenting with chronic pain in the algology service of CHU of Liège to identify possible relationships between diagnoses, psychological states and modes of pain management. Between 2005 and 2010 we monitored 1832 individual chronic pain patients who attended our pain clinic at the University Hospital of Liège. This paper presents the characteristics of these patients and their test scores before the treatment to assess their health status in a biopsychosocial perspective. Demographic and lifestyle as well as occupational factors, pain disability index, pain belief assessment, hospital anxiety and depression scale, SF-36 (Short Form Health Survey) and pain visual analogue scale are presented. The results have clinical implication; they suggest an adaptation of our therapeutic interventions based on these observations. © 2014 Springer-Verlag France. [less ▲]

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See detailExtensive scalp necrosis and subepicranial abscess in a patient with giant cell arteritis
Smitz, Simon ULg; HEINEN, Vincent ULg; Van Damme, Hendrik ULg

in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (2004), 52(1), 165-166

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See detailSkin tensile properties revisited during ageing. Where now, where next?
Hermanns-Le, Trinh ULg; Uhoda, Isabelle; Smitz, Simon ULg et al

in Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology (2004), 3(1), 35-40

Skin and its subcutaneous layer represent a complex composite of tissues, whose mechanical characteristics depend upon the mutual interdependence of their constituent parts. The molecular and ... [more ▼]

Skin and its subcutaneous layer represent a complex composite of tissues, whose mechanical characteristics depend upon the mutual interdependence of their constituent parts. The molecular and microanatomical structures of skin allow it to meet normal mechanical demands. They also determine the orientation both of Langer's lines and of relaxed skin tension lines. Ageing, photodamage, hormones, drugs, cosmetic products and dermatological interventions may modify the skin's overall tensile properties. In turn, any variation in mechanical stresses and strains imposed upon the skin's connective tissue influences the metabolic activity and phenotypic expression of fibroblasts and dermal dendrocytes. The viscoelastic functions of ageing skin can be tested by altering the orientation and magnitude of imposed stresses and strains over time. Assessment can be made of various biomechanical properties of skin: tensile, torsional, acoustic shear wave, indentation, impact and elevation. Such objective biomechanical assessments may be applied to dermocosmetic interventions, so providing opportunity for progress in cosmetic dermatological science. [less ▲]

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See detailRegional variability in mottled subclinical melanoderma in the elderly.
Petit, Ludivine; Fogouang, L.; Uhoda, Isabelle et al

in Experimental Gerontology (2003), 38(3), 327-31

The density in melanin chromatophores becomes heterogeneous in the epidermis during the early events of photoaging. Little is known about the regional variability in the resulting mottled skin appearance ... [more ▼]

The density in melanin chromatophores becomes heterogeneous in the epidermis during the early events of photoaging. Little is known about the regional variability in the resulting mottled skin appearance on the sun-exposed parts of the body in the elderly. The relationship between these features and the dermal atrophy related to aging is also an area ripe for study. The aim of the present study was to objectively assess and compare such aspects of photoaging in older subjects. A computer-assisted video camera equipped with an internal ultraviolet-emitting unit (Visioscan) was used in combination with image analysis to quantify the infraclinical mottling of the skin on the forehead, neck and dorsal forearm. A Densi Score device served to assess the dermal atrophy by rating the skin folding capacity. A mottled subclinical melanoderma was disclosed on the three evaluation sites in all subjects irrespective of their phototypes. Three main patterns were identified corresponding to regular perifollicular dots, streaky macules along shallow wrinkles and unevenly shaped macules in the interfollicular area. The extent in melanoderma was larger on the forehead than on the neck and forearm. The age after 60 years did not influence the severity of mottled melanoderma, but clearly altered the skin folding capacity. The greatest inter-individual differences in mottled melanoderma were found in phototype II subjects. In conclusion, infraclinical mottled melanoderma is present in all individuals after 60 years of age. This type of epidermal photoaging does not appear to be influenced in older ages. By contrast, skin laxity due to dermal aging continues to progress beyond the age of 60 years. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of rectal and infrared ear temperatures in older hospital inpatients.
Smitz, Simon ULg; Giagoultsis, T; Dewé, Walthère ULg et al

in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (2000), 48(1), 63-6

OBJECTIVES: To assess the agreement between infrared emission detection (IRED) ear and rectal temperatures and to determine the validity of IRED ear thermometry in detecting rectal fever. DESIGN ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To assess the agreement between infrared emission detection (IRED) ear and rectal temperatures and to determine the validity of IRED ear thermometry in detecting rectal fever. DESIGN: Prospective, convenience sample, unblinded study. SETTING: An acute geriatric unit (teaching hospital) and a multidisciplinary intensive care unit. PARTICIPANTS: The study included 45 inpatients (26 women and 19 men), aged 78.3+/-6.9 years, admitted over a 4-month period. Twelve of the patients were definitely infected. MEASUREMENTS: Sequential rectal (RT) and ear temperature (ET) measurements were performed using mercury-in-glass and IRED ear thermometers, respectively. IRED ear temperatures were measured at both ears (unadjusted mode), with the highest of six ear temperatures considered the true value. RESULTS: Mean RT (37.39 degrees C +/- 0.52 degrees C) was significantly (P<.001) higher than mean ET (36.89 degrees C +/-0.59 degrees C). A highly significant positive correlation was found between RT and ET (slope = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.52-0.86; P<.001; r = 0.78). The mean bias (mean of the differences) between RT and ET was 0.50 degrees C +/-0.37 degrees C (95% CI, 0.41 degrees C-0.59 degrees C), and the 95% limits of agreement -0.22 degrees C and 1.23 degrees C (95% CI, -0.38 degrees C to 1.39 degrees C). According to the standard criterion (RT > or =37.6 degrees C), 14 patients were febrile. Using an optimum IRED ear fever threshold (37.2 degrees C), the sensitivity and specificity of IRED ear thermometry for predicting rectal fever were 86% and 89%, respectively (positive predictive value, 80%; negative predictive value, 93%). CONCLUSIONS: The degree of agreement between rectal temperature and the highest of six IRED ear temperatures was acceptable. Using an optimal IRED ear fever threshold of 37.2 degrees C (99 degrees F), IRED ear thermometry had acceptable sensitivity and specificity for predicting rectal fever. [less ▲]

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See detailChirurgie vasculaire chez l'octogénaire
VAN DAMME, Hendrik ULg; SMITZ, Simon ULg; LARBUISSON, Robert ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1998), 53(3), 149-57

The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease increases with aging of the population. About 8% of the octogenarians present significant carotid artery stenosis, about 4% have an abdominal aortic anneurysm ... [more ▼]

The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease increases with aging of the population. About 8% of the octogenarians present significant carotid artery stenosis, about 4% have an abdominal aortic anneurysm of 40 mm or more, and 6% suffer critical limb ischemia. Carotid endarterectomy in octogenarians is a valuable tool for stroke prevention, only if the combined perioperative stroke-mortality rate is lower than 3%. Operating an abdominal aneurysm of 50 mm or more in octogenarians is characterized by an operative mortality that is higher compared to that observed in a younger patient group (4.7% vs 2.7%). Aneurysm-surgery remains nevertheless justified, since it is the only way to prevent the evolution to rupture, that is almost fatal. Limb salvage surgery should always be considered for an 80-years patient with critical limb ischemia, since readaptation after major limb-amputation is not evident for octogenarians. An extensive review of literature is presented concerning vascular aging and results of carotid surgery, aneurysm repair and lower limb revascularization in octogenarians. The authors report their own recent experience with carotid surgery and aneurysm repair in patients aged 80 years or older. [less ▲]

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See detailL'age: un facteur limitant pour la chirurgie carotidienne?
Van Damme, Hendrik ULg; Declercq, I.; Smitz, Simon ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1993), 48(4), 195-206

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See detailL'âge est-il un facteur limitant pour la chirurgie carotidienne?
Van Damme, Hendrik ULg; Smitz, Simon ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in Journal des Maladies Vasculaires (1993), 18(3), 245-53

To evaluate the role of carotid surgery in elderly patients 75 years and older, we reviewed 912 carotid endarterectomies performed on 806 patients between 1987 and 1990. There were 151 patients (19% of ... [more ▼]

To evaluate the role of carotid surgery in elderly patients 75 years and older, we reviewed 912 carotid endarterectomies performed on 806 patients between 1987 and 1990. There were 151 patients (19% of the whole series) aged 75 years and older (160 endarterectomies, group A), including 29 octogenarians, vs 655 patients under 75 years of age (group B). There were more women in the elderly age group (44%) than in the younger one (38%). Symptoms, risk factors, operative outcome and follow up data of the two groups were compared. The risk profile was similar for the two age groups, with exception for coronary heart disease, less frequent in the older patient group (25% had previous infarction vs 44%). Indication for carotid endarterectomy was different in the two age groups: 41% of group A underwent prophylactic thrombendarterectomy for high degree stenosis, while only 30% of group B had asymptomatic carotid disease. In group A, 6% of the patients had carotid endarterectomy after recovering from a mild stroke, vs 2% in group B. Angiography revealed bilateral carotid disease in 59% of the group A patients (including 15% with contralateral occlusion) vs 40% in group B. Operative mortality was 1.5% for the younger age group vs 2.5% for the older age group. The cause of death was cardiac in 60%. A follow up is available for all patients who benefited carotid endarterectomy since 1976, including 180 patients aged 75 years or older.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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See detailDose-response relationship between plasma oxytocin and ACTH concentrations during oxytocin infusion in normal men
Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Chiodera, Paolo; Geenen, Vincent ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1984), 58

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