References of "SCHEEN, André"
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See detailFacteurs génétiques et risque de dysglycémie dans des familles de diabétiques de type 2: l’étude DESCENDANCE
Franc, S; Cauchi, S; Yengo, L et al

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2015, April), 41(s1), 10-35

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See detailA review of gliptins for 2014.
Scheen, André ULg

in Expert opinion on pharmacotherapy (2015), 16(1), 43-62

Introduction: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (gliptins) occupy an increasing place in the armamentarium of drugs used for the management of hyperglycaemia and offer new opportunities for a ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (gliptins) occupy an increasing place in the armamentarium of drugs used for the management of hyperglycaemia and offer new opportunities for a personalized medicine in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Areas covered: An updated review providing an analysis of available recent data with commercialized DPP-4 inhibitors, with a special focus on: differences between the various molecules, novelties regarding their mechanism of action, clinical efficacy in mono- and various combined therapies, comparison with other new therapies, efficacy-safety profile in at risk patients, concern about pancreatic safety, perspectives in cardiovascular prevention and, finally, a selection of remaining unanswered important questions for the clinician. Expert opinion: DPP-4 inhibitors offer various advantages when compared to other glucose-lowering agents. Despite they have been commercialized since a few years only, available data obtained in randomised controlled trials are of better quality compared to those available with ancient classical glucose-lowering agents, especially in more fragile populations such as elderly people, individuals with renal impairment or at high cardiovascular risk and patients at higher risk of hypoglycaemia. However, there remain uncertainties and controversies that should be resolved by further ongoing large prospective controlled trials and increasing clinical experience combined with a careful post-marketing surveillance. [less ▲]

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See detailObesity: A new paradigm for treating obesity and diabetes mellitus.
Scheen, André ULg; Paquot, Nicolas ULg

in Nature reviews. Endocrinology (2015), 11(4), 196-198

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See detailOnce-weekly DPP-4 inhibitors: do they meet an unmet need?
Scheen, André ULg

in Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology (2015), 3(3), 162-164

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See detailLa vignette therapeutique de l'etudiant. Instaurer, surveiller et interrompre des traitements medicamenteux: un exercice pratique en vie reelle.
Scheen, André ULg

in Revue medicale de Liege (2015), 70(1), 49-53

Some patients are exposed to complex clinical situations, which impose a careful analysis of both the indications and contraindications of ongoing pharmacological treatments as well as of the dosing or ... [more ▼]

Some patients are exposed to complex clinical situations, which impose a careful analysis of both the indications and contraindications of ongoing pharmacological treatments as well as of the dosing or drug adjustments to be proposed. This article illustrates some problems encountered when a new drug therapy is initiated, when medications with narrow therapeutic window should be supervised and when some drugs should be stopped mainly for safety reasons. The clinical case relates the story of a patient with type 2 diabetes, arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease, who presents a congestive heart failure associated with an episode of atrial fibrillation and a severe renal insufficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailQuels medecins pour quelle medecine?
Scheen, André ULg

in Revue medicale de Liege (2015), 70(1), 1-4

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See detailDiabètes iatrogènes : importance d’une analyse critique du rapport bénéfices/risques des traitements en cause
SCHEEN, André ULg

in Médecine des Maladies Métaboliques (2015), 9(3), 1-3

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See detailAntidiabétiques oraux dans le traitement du diabète de type 2 : perspectives historique et médico-économique
SCHEEN, André ULg

in Médecine des Maladies Métaboliques (2015), 9(2), 186-197

Oral therapy of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is becoming increasingly complex during the last decade, with first the launch of glitazones, then that of gliptins and finally, very recently, that of gliflozins ... [more ▼]

Oral therapy of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is becoming increasingly complex during the last decade, with first the launch of glitazones, then that of gliptins and finally, very recently, that of gliflozins. However, the two oral glucose-lowering agents developed more than 50 years ago, metformin and sulfonylureas, still remain the leaders in the market. After failure of metformin monotherapy, the choice of antidiabetic medications is difficult and should be made taking into account the benefit-risk balance, with a special attention to cost of therapy and a focus on a patient-centered approach. This strategy is recommended in the recently updated joint ADA-EASD position statement, in January 2015. If the main principles of T2D therapy are universal, particularities should probably be discussed regarding regional situations, and the African continent obviously presents specificities in this respect. [less ▲]

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See detailAntidiabetic agents: Potential anti-inflammatory activity beyond glucose control.
Scheen, André ULg; Esser, N.; Paquot, Nicolas ULg

in Diabetes & metabolism (2015)

A growing body of evidence is emerging to show that abdominal obesity, the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and microvascular diabetic complications are intimately related to ... [more ▼]

A growing body of evidence is emerging to show that abdominal obesity, the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and microvascular diabetic complications are intimately related to chronic inflammation. These observations pave the way to the development of new pharmacological strategies that aim to reduce silent inflammation. However, besides specific anti-inflammatory agents, glucose-lowering medications may also exert anti-inflammatory effects that could contribute to improved outcomes in diabetic patients. Most studies have used metformin, an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, and thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which act as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) agonists. Both pharmacological classes (considered insulin-sparing agents or insulin sensitizers) appear to have greater anti-inflammatory activity than insulin-secreting agents such as sulphonylureas or glinides. In particular, TZDs have shown the widest range of evidence of lowered tissue (visceral fat and liver) and serum inflammation. In contrast, despite reducing postprandial hyperglycaemia, the effect of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors on inflammatory markers appears rather modest, whereas dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (gliptins) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists appear more promising in this respect. These incretin-based therapies exert pleiotropic effects, including reports of anti-inflammatory activity. No human data are available so far regarding sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Although they may have indirect effects due to reduced glucotoxicity, their specific mode of action in the kidneys does not suggest systemic anti-inflammatory activity. Also, in spite of the complex relationship between insulin and atherosclerosis, exogenous insulin may also exert anti-inflammatory effects. Nevertheless, for all these glucose-lowering agents, it is essential to distinguish between anti-inflammatory effects resulting from better glucose control and potential anti-inflammatory effects related to intrinsic actions of the pharmacological class. Finally, it would also be of major clinical interest to define what role the anti-inflammatory effects of these glucose-lowering agents may play in the prevention of macrovascular and microvascular diabetic complications. [less ▲]

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See detailAnti-inflammatory agents to treat or prevent type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease.
Esser, Nathalie ULg; Paquot, Nicolas ULg; Scheen, André ULg

in Expert opinion on investigational drugs (2015), 24(3), 283-307

Introduction: There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that chronic silent inflammation is a key feature in abdominal obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease ... [more ▼]

Introduction: There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that chronic silent inflammation is a key feature in abdominal obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). These observations suggest that pharmacological strategies, which reduce inflammation, may be therapeutically useful in treating obesity, type 2 diabetes and associated CVD. Area covered: The article covers novel strategies, using either small molecules or monoclonal antibodies. These strategies include: approaches targeting IKK-b-NF-kB (salicylates, salsalate), TNF-alpha (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab), IL-1beta (anakinra, canakinumab) and IL-6 (tocilizumab), AMP-activated protein kinase activators, sirtuin-1 activators, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 antagonists. Expert opinion: The available data supports the concept that targeting inflammation improves insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function; it also ameliorates glucose control in insulin-resistant patients with inflammatory rheumatoid diseases as well in patients with metabolic syndrome or T2DM. Although promising, the observed metabolic effects remain rather modest in most clinical trials. The potential use of combined anti-inflammatory agents targeting both insulin resistance and insulin secretion appears appealing but remains unexplored. Large-scale prospective clinical trials are underway to investigate the safety and efficacy of different anti-inflammatory drugs. Further evidence is needed to support the concept that targeting inflammation pathways may represent a valuable option to tackle the cardiometabolic complications of obesity. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical inertia in general practice, a matter of debate: a qualitative study with 114 general practitioners in Belgium.
Aujoulat, Isabelle; Jacquemin, Patricia; Hermans, Michel et al

in BMC family practice (2015), 16(1), 13

BackgroundPrescribing that is not concordant with guidelines is increasingly referred to as clinical inertia (CI). However, CI may be only apparent, and the absence of decision may actually reflect ... [more ▼]

BackgroundPrescribing that is not concordant with guidelines is increasingly referred to as clinical inertia (CI). However, CI may be only apparent, and the absence of decision may actually reflect appropriate inaction as a result of good clinical reasoning. Our study aimed to: (i) elucidate GPs inverted question mark beliefs regarding CI and the risk of CI in their own practice, (ii) identify modifiable provider-related factors associated with CI.MethodsWe conducted 8 group interviews with 114 general practitioners (GP) in Belgium, and used an integrated approach of thematic analysis.ResultsOur results call for a redefinition of CI, in order to take into account the GPs inverted question mark extended health-promoting role, and acknowledge that inaction or delayed action follows a process of clinical reasoning that takes into account the patients inverted question mark preferences, and that is appropriate most of the time. However, the participants in our study did acknowledge that the risk of CI exists in practice. The main factor of such a risk is when GPs feel overwhelmed and disempowered, due to characteristics of either the patients or the health care system, including contradictions between guidelines and reimbursement policies.ConclusionsAlthough situations of clinical inertia exist in practice and need to be prevented or corrected, the term clinical inertia could potentially increase the already existing gap between general practice and specialised care, whereas sustained efforts toward more collaborative work and integrated care are called for. [less ▲]

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See detailSafety of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors for treating type 2 diabetes.
Scheen, André ULg

in Expert opinion on drug safety (2015), epub

Introduction: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (gliptins) occupy a growing place in the armamentarium of drugs used for the management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, although some safety ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (gliptins) occupy a growing place in the armamentarium of drugs used for the management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, although some safety concerns have been raised in recent years. Areas covered: An updated review providing an analysis of available safety data (meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, observational cohort and case-control studies and pharmacovigilance reports) with five commercialized DPP-4 inhibitors (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, alogliptin, linagliptin). A special focus is given to overall safety profile; pancreatic adverse events (AEs) (acute pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer); overall cardiovascular safety (myocardial infarction and stroke); congestive heart failure concern and finally, safety in special populations (elderly, renal impairment). Expert opinion: The good tolerance/safety profile of DPP-4 inhibitors has been largely confirmed, including in more fragile populations (elderly, renal impairment) with almost no increased risk of infection or gastrointestinal AEs, no weight gain and a minimal risk of hypoglycemia. Although an increased risk of acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer was suspected, the complete set of available data appears reassuring so far. Cardiovascular safety of DPP-4 inhibitors has been proven but an unexpected increased risk of heart failure has been reported which should be confirmed in ongoing trials and better understood. Further postmarketing surveillance is recommended. [less ▲]

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See detailPharmacodynamics, Efficacy and Safety of Sodium-Glucose Co-Transporter Type 2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.
Scheen, André ULg

in Drugs (2015), 75(1), 33-59

Inhibitors of sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) are proposed as a novel approach for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Several compounds are already available in many countries ... [more ▼]

Inhibitors of sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 (SGLT2) are proposed as a novel approach for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Several compounds are already available in many countries (dapagliflozin, canagliflozin, empagliflozin and ipragliflozin) and some others are in a late phase of development. The available SGLT2 inhibitors share similar pharmacokinetic characteristics, with a rapid oral absorption, a long elimination half-life allowing once-daily administration, an extensive hepatic metabolism mainly via glucuronidation to inactive metabolites, the absence of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions and a low renal elimination as parent drug. SGLT2 co-transporters are responsible for reabsorption of most (90 %) of the glucose filtered by the kidneys. The pharmacological inhibition of SGLT2 co-transporters reduces hyperglycaemia by decreasing renal glucose threshold and thereby increasing urinary glucose excretion. The amount of glucose excreted in the urine depends on both the level of hyperglycaemia and the glomerular filtration rate. Results of numerous placebo-controlled randomised clinical trials of 12-104 weeks duration have shown significant reductions in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), resulting in a significant increase in the proportion of patients reaching HbA1c targets, and a significant lowering of fasting plasma glucose when SGLT2 inhibitors were administered as monotherapy or in addition to other glucose-lowering therapies including insulin in patients with T2DM. In head-to-head trials of up to 2 years, SGLT2 inhibitors exerted similar glucose-lowering activity to metformin, sulphonylureas or sitagliptin. The durability of the glucose-lowering effect of SGLT2 inhibitors appears to be better; however, this remains to be more extensively investigated. The risk of hypoglycaemia was much lower with SGLT2 inhibitors than with sulphonylureas and was similarly low as that reported with metformin, pioglitazone or sitagliptin. Increased renal glucose elimination also assists weight loss and could help to reduce blood pressure. Both effects were very consistent across the trials and they represent some advantages for SGLT2 inhibitors when compared with other oral glucose-lowering agents. The pharmacodynamic response to SGLT2 inhibitors declines with increasing severity of renal impairment, and prescribing information for each SGLT2 inhibitor should be consulted regarding dosage adjustments or restrictions in moderate to severe renal dysfunction. Caution is also recommended in the elderly population because of a higher risk of renal impairment, orthostatic hypotension and dehydration, even if the absence of hypoglycaemia represents an obvious advantage in this population. The overall effect of SGLT2 inhibitors on the risk of cardiovascular disease is unknown and will be evaluated in several ongoing prospective placebo-controlled trials with cardiovascular outcomes. The impact of SGLT2 inhibitors on renal function and their potential to influence the course of diabetic nephropathy also deserve more attention. SGLT2 inhibitors are generally well-tolerated. The most frequently reported adverse events are female genital mycotic infections, while urinary tract infections are less commonly observed and generally benign. In conclusion, with their unique mechanism of action that is independent of insulin secretion and action, SGLT2 inhibitors are a useful addition to the therapeutic options available for the management of T2DM at any stage in the natural history of the disease. Although SGLT2 inhibitors have already been extensively investigated, further studies should even better delineate the best place of these new glucose-lowering agents in the already rich armamentarium for the management of T2DM. [less ▲]

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See detailCanagliflozine (Invokana®) : inhibiteur des cotransporteurs rénaux sglt2 pour traiter le diabète de type 2
SCHEEN, André ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(12), 692-699

Canagliflozin is an inhibitor of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) that are present in renal tubules. This specific insulin-independent mechanism promotes glucosuria, which results in a ... [more ▼]

Canagliflozin is an inhibitor of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) that are present in renal tubules. This specific insulin-independent mechanism promotes glucosuria, which results in a reduction in fasting and postprandial glycaemia and a decrease of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Furthermore, canagliflozin promotes weight loss and lowers arterial (mainly systolic) blood pressure. Its efficacy is decreased in patients with renal insufficiency and the treatment should be stopped if estimated glomerular filtration rate is below 45 ml/min/1.73 m². Both the efficacy and safety of canagliflozin have been investigated in 24 to 104-week controlled trials versus placebo or versus an active comparator (glimepiride or sitagliptin). The mean reduction in HbA1c averages 0.75% when added to other treatments, as compared to placebo. The 100 mg dose is as active as sitagliptin 100 mg while the 300 mg canagliflozin dose is even more efficacious. Adverse events are mostly mycotic genital infections and more rarely mild urinary tract infections. Caution is required in elderly patients and the risk of volume depletion should be checked (hypotension). Hypoglycaemia may occur only in patients already treated with an insulin-secreting agent or insulin. Canagliflozin is commercialized under the trade name Invokana®, at the doses of 100 mg and 300 mg once daily, for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. [less ▲]

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See detailComment je traite … Recommandations pour interrompre un traitement médicamenteux
SCHEEN, André ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69(12), 644-649

L’interruption d’un traitement pharmacologique est une situation clinique fréquente qui peut paraître plus simple à gérer que l’instauration d’un nouveau traitement, mais qui impose néanmoins de remplir ... [more ▼]

L’interruption d’un traitement pharmacologique est une situation clinique fréquente qui peut paraître plus simple à gérer que l’instauration d’un nouveau traitement, mais qui impose néanmoins de remplir certaines conditions et de respecter certaines précautions : 1) pouvoir expliciter les raisons qui justifient l’arrêt du traitement; 2) vérifier qu’il n’y a pas de danger à interrompre le traitement (même si cette interruption est transitoire); 3) savoir comment gérer au mieux l’arrêt de la thérapeutique, en particulier choisir entre une interruption immédiate et une décroissance posologique progressive; et, enfin, 4) assurer un suivi approprié du patient dûment informé chez lequel le traitement vient d’être stoppé. [less ▲]

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