References of "SCHAAF, Nicole"
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See detailA four-parameter index of marrow dysplasia has predictive value for survival in myelodysplastic syndromes.
Tassin, Françoise ULg; Dewé, Walthère ULg; Schaaf, Nicole ULg et al

in Leukemia & Lymphoma (2000), 36(5-6), 485-96

Marrow dysplasia is a major characteristic of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), along with marrow blastosis, cytopenia and cytogenetic anomalies. However, the impact of the degree of marrow ... [more ▼]

Marrow dysplasia is a major characteristic of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), along with marrow blastosis, cytopenia and cytogenetic anomalies. However, the impact of the degree of marrow dysplasia on survival has not been fully assessed. In this retrospective analysis of 111 patients selected according to the IPSS criteria of MDS diagnosis, the presence or absence of 21 dysplasia characteristics recognizable in bone marrow smears stained by the May-Grunwald-Giemsa method was correlated with patient survival. Using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, megaloblastosis (MEGALO), neutrophil agranularity (AGRAN) and hypogranularity (HYPOGRAN) were highly significant predictors (p < 0.005), and Pelger-Huet anomaly (PELGHUET) a significant predictor (p = 0.05), of patient survival. The regression analysis yielded a dysplasia-based risk index (DI) where DI = 1.26 MEGALO + 0.82 AGRAN - 1.08 HYPOGRAN + 0.45 PELGHUET. The two subgroups of 60 and 47 patients with DI < or = 0 and > 0 showed highly significant differences in median survivals (2.6 vs 1.1 yrs; p <0.0001). Multivariate analysis further showed that DI offered additional predictive power that was independent of that provided by the IPSS (p=0.002 and 0.001 respectively). Analysis of survival curves stratified for IPSS and DI showed that the additional predictive power offered by inclusion of the DI essentially concerned the IPSS low/INT-1 risk categories. Further stratification for age did not improve survival prediction. The data indicate that a set of 4 dysplasia parameters can offer some prediction for survival of MDS patients in addition to that provided by the IPSS. Further multicenter studies should aim at including some form of evaluation of the degree of dysplasia in prognostic systems. [less ▲]

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See detailTranslocation (2;3)(p21;q26) as the sole anomaly in a case of primary myelofibrosis.
Herens, Christian ULg; Hermanne, Jean-Philippe; Tassin, Françoise ULg et al

in Cancer Genetics & Cytogenetics (1999), 110(1), 62-4

Translocation t(2p;3q) is a rare but recurrent finding in myeloid disorders. We present the first case of primary myelofibrosis with t(2;3)(p21;q26) as the sole chromosomal anomaly. The comparison with ... [more ▼]

Translocation t(2p;3q) is a rare but recurrent finding in myeloid disorders. We present the first case of primary myelofibrosis with t(2;3)(p21;q26) as the sole chromosomal anomaly. The comparison with the 11 other previously published myeloid-associated t(2p;3q) cases confirms that this nonrandom translocation involves a pluripotent stem cell and is associated with a poor prognosis. [less ▲]

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See detailHematopoietic recovery in cancer patients after transplantation of autologous peripheral blood CD34+ cells or unmanipulated peripheral blood stem and progenitor cells.
Beguin, Yves ULg; Baudoux, Etienne ULg; Sautois, Brieuc ULg et al

in Transfusion (1998), 38(2), 199-208

BACKGROUND: A study of CD34+ cell selection and transplantation was carried out with particular emphasis on characteristics of short- and long-term hematopoietic recovery. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: A study of CD34+ cell selection and transplantation was carried out with particular emphasis on characteristics of short- and long-term hematopoietic recovery. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Peripheral blood stem and progenitor cells (PBPCs) were collected from 32 patients, and 17 CD34+ cell-selection procedures were carried out in 15 of the 32. One patient in whom two procedures failed to provide 1 x 10(6) CD34+ cells per kg was excluded from further analysis. After conditioning, patients received CD34+ cells (n = 10, CD34 group) or unmanipulated (n = 17, PBPC group) PBPCs containing equivalent amounts of CD34+ cells or progenitors. RESULTS: The yield of CD34+ cells was 53 percent (18-100) with a purity of 63 percent (49-82). The CD34+ fraction contained 66 percent of colony-forming units--granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and 58 percent of CFU of mixed lineages, but only 33 percent of burst-forming units-erythroid (BFU-E) (p < 0.05). Early recovery of neutrophils and reticulocytes was identical in the two groups, although a slight delay in platelet recovery may be seen with CD34+ cell selection. Late hematopoietic reconstitution, up to 1.5 years after transplant, was also similar. The two groups were thus combined for analyses of dose effects. A dose of 40 x 10(4) CFU-GM per kg ensured recovery of neutrophils to a level of 1 x 10(9) per L within 11 days, 15 x 10(4) CFU of mixed lineages per kg was associated with platelet independence within 11 days, and 100 x 10(4) BFU-E per kg predicted red cell independence within 13 days. However, a continuous effect of cell dose well beyond these thresholds was apparent, at least for neutrophil recovery. CONCLUSION: CD34+ cell selection, despite lower efficiency in collecting BFU-E, provides a suitable graft with hematopoietic capacity comparable to that of unmanipulated PBPCs. In both groups, all patients will eventually show hematopoietic recovery of all three lineages with 1 x 10(6) CD34+ cells per kg or 5 x 10(4) CFU-GM per kg, but a dose of 5 x 10(6) CD34+ cells or 40 x 10(4) CFU-GM per kg is critical to ensure rapid recovery. [less ▲]

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See detailDecrease in systemic tolerance to fed ovalbumin in indomethacin-treated mice.
Louis, Edouard ULg; Franchimont, D.; Deprez, Manuel ULg et al

in International Archives of Allergy & Immunology (1996), 109(1), 21-6

The oral administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to animals induces a quick increase in intestinal permeability and secondary inflammatory lesions of the intestine. The mechanisms ... [more ▼]

The oral administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to animals induces a quick increase in intestinal permeability and secondary inflammatory lesions of the intestine. The mechanisms leading to the inflammatory lesions are hypothetical. The increased intestinal permeability could allow a greater mucosal and systemic penetration of fed antigens and bacterial products leading to an abnormal mucosal and systemic immune and inflammatory response toward these materials. We examined the effect of oral dosing with indomethacin on ovalbumin serum levels and the systemic immune response to ovalbumin in mice fed with ovalbumin. The ovalbumin serum level was higher in indomethacin-treated mice and the increase was proportional to the dose of indomethacin. It was associated with epithelial and subepithelial lesions. Moreover, the systemic humoral and, to a lesser extent, the cellular tolerance were partially abrogated in the treated mice. These findings suggest that the oral administration of indomethacin in mice induces an increased passage of fed antigen through the intestinal epithelium associated with a decrease in systemic tolerance to this antigen. The reason for this decrease remains unclear. Besides a disequilibrium between systemic and mucosal immune responses, a loss of integrity of the intestinal epithelial cells and a direct immunomodulating effect of indomethacin may also be involved. This decrease in systemic tolerance to luminal antigen could be involved in the development of NSAID enteropathy. [less ▲]

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See detailSystemic Immune Response after Rectocolonic Administration of Ovalbumin in Mice
Louis, Edouard ULg; Franchimont, D.; Lamproye, Anne ULg et al

in International Archives of Allergy & Immunology (1995), 108(1), 19-23

The aim of our study was to determine the effect of a rectocolonic preimmunization with ovalbumin on the systemic immune response induced by a subsequent subcutaneous injection of this antigen in Balb/c ... [more ▼]

The aim of our study was to determine the effect of a rectocolonic preimmunization with ovalbumin on the systemic immune response induced by a subsequent subcutaneous injection of this antigen in Balb/c mice. One rectocolonic, but not intragastric, administration of 25 mg of ovalbumin induced a detectable increase in serum anti-ovalbumin antibody level. The level reached was however much lower than after subcutaneous injection. Both intragastric and rectocolonic immunization with ovalbumin induced specific systemic cellular tolerance. However, after rectocolonic, but not intragastric, preimmunization there was no systemic humoral tolerance to this antigen. These differences in systemic immune responses after rectocolonic or intragastric administration of ovalbumin could be due to different stimulation of the systemic immune system or to differences between the colonic and small bowel mucosal immune system, which remain to be elucidated. [less ▲]

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See detailSoluble Interleukin-2 Receptor in Crohn's Disease. Assessment of Disease Activity and Prediction of Relapse
Louis, Edouard ULg; Belaiche, Jacques ULg; Van Kemseke, Catherine ULg et al

in Digestive Diseases & Sciences (1995), 40(8), 1750-6

In Crohn's disease, the activity of the disease is difficult to evaluate and the evolution of the disease is difficult to predict. The soluble interleukin-2 receptor serum level has been reported to ... [more ▼]

In Crohn's disease, the activity of the disease is difficult to evaluate and the evolution of the disease is difficult to predict. The soluble interleukin-2 receptor serum level has been reported to correlate with clinical activity of the disease and with mucosal immune activation. We compared serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor to classical inflammatory markers and other immune parameters in the assessment of clinical disease activity and prediction of relapse in patients with Crohn's disease. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor serum levels correlated well with the Crohn's disease activity index, and multivariate analysis showed that this correlation was independent of the other inflammatory and immune markers. The correlation was not greater, However, than that between some inflammatory markers, such as ESR, and Crohn's disease activity index. Longitudinal follow-up showed that a high soluble interleukin-2 receptor serum level was highly predictive of relapse. Multivariate analysis showed that the soluble interleukin-2 recepteur serum level was complementary to other inflammatory and clinical markers in the prediction of relapse of disease. We conclude that soluble interleukin-2 receptor is of use in monitoring Crohn's disease, particularly in prediction of relapse. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression de l'antigene DRC1 par les cellules leucemiques.
Antoine, Nadine ULg; Beckers, Catherine ULg; Marcoty, C. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1992), 47(2), 95-9

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See detailIsolation of follicular dendritic cells from human tonsils and adenoids. V. Effect on lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation.
Cormann, N.; Lesage, F.; Heinen, Ernst ULg et al

in Immunology Letters (1986), 14(1), 29-35

Follicular dendritic cells (FDC) are located only in lymph follicles and are characterized by their capacity to retain high amounts of immune complexes on their plasma membranes. As their functions in ... [more ▼]

Follicular dendritic cells (FDC) are located only in lymph follicles and are characterized by their capacity to retain high amounts of immune complexes on their plasma membranes. As their functions in germinal centres are unknown, we isolated them from human tonsils and cultured them with autologous lymphoid cells. Cultures of lymphoid cells alone or with added macrophages were used as controls. Lymphoid cells incorporated tritiated thymidine only when FDC and lectins were added; this could be shown after several periods of time. However, the Ig secretion by lymphoid cell populations was inhibited by FDC after several days in vitro. In contrast, the supernatants of lymphocytes cultured alone or with macrophages only for the same periods of time contained increasing amounts of immunoglobulins. This inhibitory effect of FDC on immunoglobulin production was observed for all considered isotypes. Our data suggest that FDC stimulate lymphoid cell proliferation but reduce B-cell differentiation. This is the first accessory cell activity definitely shown for FDC in cultures. [less ▲]

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