References of "SAVA, Simona Liliana"
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See detailSafety and patients' satisfaction of transcutaneous supraorbital neurostimulation (tSNS) with the Cefaly® device in headache treatment: a survey of 2,313 headache sufferers in the general population.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; SAVA, Simona Liliana ULg; D'Elia, Tullia Sasso et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2013), 14

BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation (tSNS) with the Cefaly® device was recently found superior to sham stimulation for episodic migraine prevention in a randomized trial. Its safety ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous supraorbital nerve stimulation (tSNS) with the Cefaly® device was recently found superior to sham stimulation for episodic migraine prevention in a randomized trial. Its safety and efficiency in larger cohorts of headache sufferers in the general population remain to be determined.The objective of this study was to assess the satisfaction with the Cefaly® device in 2,313 headache sufferers who rented the device for a 40-day trial period via Internet. METHODS: Only subjects using specific anti-migraine drugs, and thus most likely suffering from migraine, were included in the survey. Adverse events (AEs) and willingness to continue tSNS were monitored via phone interviews after the trial period. A built-in software allowed monitoring the total duration of use and hence compliance in subjects who returned the device to the manufacturer after the trial period. RESULTS: After a testing period of 58.2 days on average, 46.6% of the 2,313 renters were not satisfied and returned the device, but the compliance check showed that they used it only for 48.6% of the recommended time. The remaining 54.4% of subjects were satisfied with the tSNS treatment and willing to purchase the device. Ninety-nine subjects out of the 2,313 (4.3%) reported one or more AEs, but none of them was serious. The most frequent AEs were local pain/intolerance to paresthesia (47 subjects, i.e. 2.03%), arousal changes (mostly sleepiness/fatigue, sometimes insomnia, 19 subjects, i.e. 0.82%), headache after the stimulation (12 subjects, i.e. 0.52%). A transient local skin allergy was seen in 2 subjects, i.e. 0.09%. CONCLUSIONS: This survey of 2,313 headache sufferers in the general population confirms that tSNS with is a safe and well-tolerated treatment for migraine headaches that provides satisfaction to a majority of patients who tested it for 40 days. Only 4.3% of subjects reported AEs, all of them were minor and fully reversible. [less ▲]

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See detailPearls and pitfalls: Electrophysiology for primary headaches
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Vigano, Alessandro; SAVA, Simona Liliana ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2013)

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See detailTranscranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) of the visual cortex: a proof-of-concept study based on interictal electrophysiological abnormalities in migraine
Vigano, Alessandro; Sasso d'Elia, Tullia; SAVA, Simona Liliana ULg et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2013), 14(23),

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See detailQuadripulse Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Visual Cortex for Chronic Migraine Prevention: A Pilot-Trial
Sasso d'Elia, Tullia; Vigano, Alessandro; Fataki, Michel et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2013), 33(8), 49

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See detailAnodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the visual cortex as a preventive treatment of migraine: a proof-of-concept study.
Sasso d'Elia, Tullia; Vigano, Alessandro; SAVA, Simona Liliana ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012, September)

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See detailSupraorbital transcutaneous neurostimulation has sedative effects in healthy subjects.
Piquet, Maxime; Balestra, Costantino; SAVA, Simona Liliana ULg et al

in BMC Neurology (2011), 11

BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous neurostimulation (TNS) at extracephalic sites is a well known treatment of pain. Thanks to recent technical progress, the Cefaly(R) device now also allows supraorbital TNS ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous neurostimulation (TNS) at extracephalic sites is a well known treatment of pain. Thanks to recent technical progress, the Cefaly(R) device now also allows supraorbital TNS. During observational clinical studies, several patients reported decreased vigilance or even sleepiness during a session of supraorbital TNS. We decided therefore to explore in more detail the potential sedative effect of supraorbital TNS, using standardized psychophysical tests in healthy volunteers. METHODS: We performed a double-blind cross-over sham-controlled study on 30 healthy subjects. They underwent a series of 4 vigilance tests (Psychomotor Vigilance Task, Critical Flicker Fusion Frequency, Fatigue Visual Numeric Scale, d2 test). Each subject was tested under 4 different experimental conditions: without the neurostimulation device, with sham supraorbital TNS, with low frequency supraorbital TNS and with high frequency supraorbital TNS. RESULTS: As judged by the results of three tests (Psychomotor Vigilance Task, Critical Flicker Fusion Frequency, Fatigue Visual Numeric Scale) there was a statistically significant (p < 0.001) decrease in vigilance and attention during high frequency TNS, while there were no changes during the other experimental conditions. Similarly, performance on the d2 test was impaired during high frequency TNS, but this change was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Supraorbital high frequency TNS applied with the Cefaly(R) device decreases vigilance in healthy volunteers. Additional studies are needed to determine the duration of this effect, the underlying mechanisms and the possible relation with the stimulation parameters. Meanwhile, this effect opens interesting perspectives for the treatment of hyperarousal states and, possibly, insomnia. [less ▲]

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