References of "Rovati, Lucio"
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See detailHealth claims assessment in the field of joint and cartilage: a consensus viewpoint of the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Avouac, Bernard; Richette, Pascal et al

in Current Medical Research & Opinion (2012), 28(4), 611-6

Abstract Introduction: In 2006, the European Parliament and Council issued a regulation (No. 1924/2006) for the nutrition and health claims made on foods, including food supplements. According to the ... [more ▼]

Abstract Introduction: In 2006, the European Parliament and Council issued a regulation (No. 1924/2006) for the nutrition and health claims made on foods, including food supplements. According to the regulation, the use of nutrition and health claims shall only be permitted if the substance in respect of which the claim is made has been shown to have a beneficial nutritional or physiological effect. In the field of joint and cartilage health, there is no clear scientific-based definition of the nature of such a beneficial nutritional or physiological effect. The objective of this paper is to scientifically define the possible content of health claims related to joint and cartilage health and to provide scientific guidelines for the design of clinical studies which need to be adopted to substantiate such health claims. Methods: Literature review up to September 2011 followed by a consensus expert discussion organized by the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science (GREES). Results: In line with the general principles of the PASSCLAIM and the Codex recommendations, the GREES identified four acceptable health claims related to joint and cartilage health based on the effects on discomfort, joint and cartilage structural integrity or risk factors for joint and cartilage diseases. The GREES considers that randomized controlled trials on a relevant outcome is the best design to assess health claims. Moreover, animal studies could also be of interest to substantiate some health claims, to assess the clinical relevance of endpoints used in human studies or to extrapolate data obtained in patients to the target (apparently) healthy population. Conclusion: According to the methodology and biomarkers used in the study and whether or not additional animal studies are provided to support the claim, various health claims can be acceptable in the field of joint and cartilage health. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucosamine sulfate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: impact on health utility.
Scholtissen, S.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2009, March), 20(Suppl.1), 149

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See detailEffect of glucosamine sulfate on health utility data in patients with knee osteoarthritis : reanalysis of two 3-year prospective studies.
Scholtissen, S.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2009, March), 20(Suppl.1), 18

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See detailClinical severity of knee osteoarthritis poorly predicts long-term radiographic outcomes
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Lejeune, Eric ULg et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2002, September), 46(number 9 (suppl.)), 153

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