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See detailThe HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets. XXXVI. Planetary systems and stellar activity of the M dwarfs GJ 3293, GJ 3341, and GJ 3543
Astudillo-Defru, N.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2015), 575

Context. Planetary companions of a fixed mass induce reflex motions with a larger amplitude around lower-mass stars, which adds to making M dwarfs excellent targets for extra-solar planet searches. The ... [more ▼]

Context. Planetary companions of a fixed mass induce reflex motions with a larger amplitude around lower-mass stars, which adds to making M dwarfs excellent targets for extra-solar planet searches. The most recent velocimeters with a stability of ~1 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP] can detect very low-mass planets out to the habitable zone of these stars. Low-mass small planets are abundant around M dwarfs, and most of the known potentially habitable planets orbit one of these cool stars. <BR /> Aims: Our M-dwarf radial velocity monitoring with HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla observatory makes a major contribution to this sample. <BR /> Methods: We present here dense radial velocity (RV) time series for three M dwarfs observed over ~five years: GJ 3293 (0.42 M[SUB]⊙[/SUB]), GJ 3341 (0.47 M[SUB]⊙[/SUB]), and GJ 3543 (0.45 M[SUB]⊙[/SUB]). We extracted these RVs through minimum χ[SUP]2[/SUP]-matching of each spectrum against a stack of all observed spectra for the same star that has a high signal-to-noise ratio. We then compared potential orbital signals against several stellar activity indicators to distinguish the Keplerian variations induced by planets from the spurious signals that result from rotational modulation of stellar surface inhomogeneities and from activity cycles. <BR /> Results: Two Neptune-mass planets - msin(i) = 1.4 ± 0.1 and 1.3 ± 0.1M[SUB]nept[/SUB] - orbit GJ 3293 with periods P = 30.60 ± 0.02 d and P = 123.98 ± 0.38 d, possibly together with a super-Earth - msin(i) ~ 7.9 ± 1.4 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB] - with period P = 48.14 ± 0.12d. A super-Earth - msin(i) ~ 6.1 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB] - orbits GJ 3341 with P = 14.207 ± 0.007d. The RV variations of GJ 3543, on the other hand, reflect its stellar activity rather than planetary signals. Based on observations made with the HARPS instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope under the program IDs 072.C-0488, 082.C-0718 and 183.C-0437 at Cerro La Silla (Chile).Tables A.1-A.3 (radial velocity data) are available in electronic form at <A href="http://www.aanda.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201424253/olm">http://www.aanda.org</A> and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr</A> (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/575/A119">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/575/A119</A> [less ▲]

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See detailSix newly-discovered hot Jupiters transiting F/G stars: WASP-87b, WASP-108b, WASP-109b, WASP-110b, WASP-111b \amp WASP-112b
Anderson, D. R.; Brown, D. J. A.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

E-print/Working paper (2014)

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See detailThe 3/4 July 2010 Pluto Stellar-Occultation Observations
Pasachoff, Jay M; Elliot, J. L.; Souza, S. P. et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (2010, October 01), 42

Continuing our monitoring of Pluto's atmospheric temperature and pressure, previously shown by us to be increasing (Elliot et al., Nature 424, 165, 2003; Pasachoff et al., AJ 129, 1718, 2005) and ... [more ▼]

Continuing our monitoring of Pluto's atmospheric temperature and pressure, previously shown by us to be increasing (Elliot et al., Nature 424, 165, 2003; Pasachoff et al., AJ 129, 1718, 2005) and subsequently found by us to be leveling off (Elliot et al., AJ 134, 1, 2007), we report on a stellar occultation by Pluto of UCAC2 mag=15.3, observed from South America and Africa on 4 July 2010 UT. Success was achieved with a 0.45 m at Cerro Calan using one of our POETS (Portable Occultation, Eclipse, and Transit System; Souza et al. PASP 118, 1550, 2006), a 1.0 SMARTS (Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System) at Cerro Tololo, four 0.6 m telescopes of PROMPT (Panchromatic Robotic Optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes) on Cerro Tololo, and TRAPPIST's (TRansiting Planets and Planetesimals Small Telescope) 0.6-m telescope on La Silla in Chile; the 0.35 m telescope of U. Ponta Grossa, Brazil; and the 0.75-m ATOM (Automatic Telescope for Optical Monitoring), Namibia, using POETS. Winds prevented opening the 6.5 m Magellan/Clay telescope on Las Campanas, Chile, with its own frame-transfer camera, and clouds obscured the 1.9 m telescope at Sutherland, South Africa, which had POETS. With shadow velocity 23.6 km/s, it was a rapid event: maximum occultation <2 minutes. The observations were supported in part by grants NNX08AO50G to Williams College and NNX10AB27G to MIT from NASA's Planetary Astronomy Division, and NNH08AI17I to USNO for astrometry. Student participation was supported in part by NASA's Massachusetts Space Grant and NSF's REU. Japan's government donated U. Chile's Cerro Calan Goto telescope. PROMPT observations were made possible by the Robert Martin Ayers Science Fund. TRAPPIST is a project driven by the University of Liège, in close collaboration with the Observatory of Geneva, supported by the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research and the Swiss National Science Foundation. [less ▲]

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