References of "Roberty, Stéphane"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLack of isocitrate lyase in Chlamydomonas leads to changes in carbon metabolism and in the response to oxidative stress under mixotrophic growth.
Plancke, Charlotte; Vigeolas, Hélène ULg; Hohner, Ricarda et al

in The Plant journal : for cell and molecular biology (2014), 77(3), 404-417

Isocitrate lyase is a key enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle. This cycle plays an essential role in cell growth on acetate, and is important for gluconeogenesis as it bypasses the two oxidative steps of the ... [more ▼]

Isocitrate lyase is a key enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle. This cycle plays an essential role in cell growth on acetate, and is important for gluconeogenesis as it bypasses the two oxidative steps of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in which CO2 is evolved. In this paper, a null icl mutant of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is described. Our data show that isocitrate lyase is required for growth in darkness on acetate (heterotrophic conditions), as well as for efficient growth in the light when acetate is supplied (mixotrophic conditions). Under these latter conditions, reduced acetate assimilation and concomitant reduced respiration occur, and biomass composition analysis reveals an increase in total fatty acid content, including neutral lipids and free fatty acids. Quantitative proteomic analysis by 14 N/15 N labelling was performed, and more than 1600 proteins were identified. These analyses reveal a strong decrease in the amounts of enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis in parallel with a shift of the TCA cycle towards amino acid synthesis, accompanied by an increase in free amino acids. The decrease of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis, as well as the decrease in enzymes involved in beta-oxidation of fatty acids in the icl mutant are probably major factors that contribute to remodelling of lipids in the icl mutant. These modifications are probably responsible for the elevation of the response to oxidative stress, with significantly augmented levels and activities of superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase, and increased resistance to paraquat. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (20 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNatural spatial variability of algal endosymbiont density in the coral Acropora globiceps: a small-scale approach along environmental gradients around Moorea (French Polynesia)
Ladrière, Ophélie ULg; Penin, Lucie; Van Lierde, Elodie et al

in Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom (2013)

This study provides a baseline describing natural small scale variability of Symbiodinium density in the sentinel coral Acropora globiceps during the summer, under non-bleaching conditions. Spatial scales ... [more ▼]

This study provides a baseline describing natural small scale variability of Symbiodinium density in the sentinel coral Acropora globiceps during the summer, under non-bleaching conditions. Spatial scales investigated range from the colony scale (1–10 cm, i.e. among branches of the same colony) to the reef scale (1–10 km, i.e. among stations distributed over several locations and depths), at Moorea Island, French Polynesia. The coral–Symbiodinium symbiosis is a key process in scleractinian coral physiology, and Symbiodinium density provides an easy-to-measure and inexpensive biomarker of this symbiosis health. Spatial variability of three major environmental factors: light intensity, sedimentation and water motion was also assessed to evaluate their potential link with Symbiodinium density. Density of Symbiodinium did not significantly differ within colonies or among colonies within a station. However, a marked depth gradient was observed, showing increasing density with increasing depth and decreasing light intensity. These observations provide an interesting reference for forthcoming comparisons with disturbed conditions, such as bleaching events. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailO2: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) from reef-building corals
Roberty, Stéphane ULg

Doctoral thesis (2013)

Coral reefs are among the most beautiful and complex of all ecosystems on Earth. Although they cover less than 1% of the world’s oceans area, this marine ecosystem harbors a huge biodiversity and is vital ... [more ▼]

Coral reefs are among the most beautiful and complex of all ecosystems on Earth. Although they cover less than 1% of the world’s oceans area, this marine ecosystem harbors a huge biodiversity and is vital to human society and industries. The foundation of coral reefs relies on the fragile mutualistic relationship between reef-building corals and their photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. However, this symbiosis is highly sensitive to environmental or anthropogenic disturbances and may be disrupted, thus leading to the coral bleaching phenomenon. It has been reported that the initial steps of this process are linked to photosynthesis and the antioxidant network in Symbiodinium. However the nature of the cellular mechanisms leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species and to the disruption of the symbiosis is not completely unraveled. Therefore, this study aimed to highlight the existence of photosynthetic alternative electron flows reducing molecular oxygen and the way by which they can induces an oxidative stress, in four Symbiodinium strains belonging to three different clades. Joint measurements of oxygen evolution, PSI and PSII activities by chlorophyll a fluorescence and spectrophotometric measurements allowed us to demonstrate that photoreduction of oxygen by the so-called Mehler reaction is the main electron sink at the onset of photosynthesis and during steady state photosynthesis. When Symbiodinium cells were exposed to high light conditions, the Mehler reaction and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle (water-water cycle) acted as a safety valve and drained up to 50% of the electrons from PSII, protecting it from photoinhibition and dissipating rapidly the excess photon energy by downregulation of PSII. As long as the WWC efficiency was maintained in the chloroplasts of Symbiodinium, ROS generated as a by-product of the Mehler reaction did not significantly damage target molecules and induced an acclimatory response through up-regulation of enzymes involved in the antioxidant response (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase). Nevertheless, when cells were exposed to light stress and elevated temperature (33°C), the WWC supported 75% of the electrons coming from PSII. This increase generated twice more H2O2 than during the treatment at 26°C and resulted in the inactivation of target enzymes of the WWC. Therefore, this means that under these conditions the photoprotective functions of the WWC can no longer be maintained, thus opening the way to ROS accumulation and to the induction of coral bleaching.We found that the response to oxidative stress differed between and within Symbiodinium clades. Symbiodinium clade A was less sensitive to the chemical induced oxidative stress than the others investigated strains. These variations are most likely related to their geographic origin, their thermal history, as well as to their physiological adaptations to the local environment. They may contribute to the explanation of why coral colonies and coral species have been found to differ in their susceptibilities to bleach. However, although the antioxidant response differs to some extent, some common traits were conserved. Among them, Diatoxanthin, a xanthophyll pigment involved in the non-photochemical quenching process could also have an antioxidant function. In addition, it seems that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in the antioxidant response by eliminating carbonylated protein. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIncreased Cell Proliferation and Mucocyte Density in the Sea Anemone Aiptasia pallida Recovering from Bleaching
Fransolet, David ULg; Roberty, Stéphane ULg; Herman, Anne-Catherine et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(5), 65015

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (7 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailAlternative photosynthetic electron pathways in symbiotic dinoflagellates of reef-building corals
Roberty, Stéphane ULg; Cardol, Pierre ULg; Franck, Fabrice ULg

Conference (2012, July 11)

The high productivity of coral reef ecosystems is largely attributed to the mutualistic symbiosis between reef-building corals and their intracellular dinoflagellate in the genus Symbiodinium. In the ... [more ▼]

The high productivity of coral reef ecosystems is largely attributed to the mutualistic symbiosis between reef-building corals and their intracellular dinoflagellate in the genus Symbiodinium. In the natural environment the holobiont have to cope with significant daily variations in light intensities that sometimes exceed Symbiodinium photosynthetic capacity. Fortunately, photosynthetic organisms possess regulatory features that help to ensure that high light intensities can be endured without the accumulation of photodamage. Thus, the regulation of photosynthesis can be viewed as a dynamic balance between photosynthetic efficiency (photochemical quenching) and photoprotection processes (i.e. non-photochemical quenching). In addition to the linear electron flow (LEF) operating during oxygenic photosynthesis, alternative electron flows (AEF) have been widely described in higher plants and microalgae but not in Symbiodinium. The present study aimed to highlight the existence of the Mehler ascorbate peroxidase pathway (reduction of oxygen by PSI), chlororespiration (oxidation by molecular O2 of the PQ pool) and cyclic electron flow around PSI. We report that the presence of particular AEF and/or their amplitude vary from one clade to another. These processes could play a key role under particular environmental conditions when sinks for photosynthetic electrons are scarce. Indeed, they could sustain significant levels of photosynthetic electron flux by initiating the ΔpH formation and of NPQ, regulating the ratio of ATP/NADPH to match the requirements of carbon reduction and reducing the excitation pressure over the photosynthetic apparatus. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (12 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIncreased cell proliferation in Seriatopora hystrix following heat-induced bleaching
Fransolet, David ULg; Ugille, Aurélie; Leblud, Julien et al

Poster (2012, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEstablishment of endosymbiosis: The case of cnidarians and Symbiodinium
Fransolet, David ULg; Roberty, Stéphane ULg; Plumier, Jean-Christophe ULg

in Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology (2012), 420–421

The symbiosis between cnidarians and Symbiodinium algae (dinoflagellates) is the keystone responsible for the formation of the huge and important structures that are coral reefs. Today many environmental ... [more ▼]

The symbiosis between cnidarians and Symbiodinium algae (dinoflagellates) is the keystone responsible for the formation of the huge and important structures that are coral reefs. Today many environmental and/or anthropogenic threats compromise this tight relationship and lead to more frequent events of drastic loss of Symbiodinium pigments and eventually of algae themselves from cnidarians, better known as cnidarian bleaching. While the mechanisms underlying the collapse of the algae–coral symbiosis are progressively getting unraveled, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the de novo infection of bleached cnidarians by Symbiodinium remains elusive. In this review, we describe the various steps needed to establish a stable symbiotic relationship between Symbiodinium and cnidarians. We review the mechanisms implicated in host–symbiont recognition and in symbiosome formation and persistence, with a special emphasis on the role played by lectins and Rab proteins. A better understanding of these molecular mechanisms may contribute to the development of strategies to promote post-bleaching recovery of corals. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIncreased number of mucocytes in Aiptasia pallida following heat-induced bleaching
Fransolet, David ULg; Herman, Anne-Catherine; Roberty, Stéphane ULg et al

Poster (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIncreased number of mucocytes in Aiptasia pallida following bleaching
Fransolet, David ULg; Herman, Anne-Catherine; Roberty, Stéphane ULg et al

in Yellowlees, D; Hughes, T P (Eds.) proceedings of the 12th International Coral Reef Symposium (2012)

While many studies have investigated histological changes occurring in cnidarians during bleaching, only a few have focused on continuing changes in tissues during the recovery period. Here, we examine ... [more ▼]

While many studies have investigated histological changes occurring in cnidarians during bleaching, only a few have focused on continuing changes in tissues during the recovery period. Here, we examine the response of the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida to a transient elevation of water temperature combined with high illumination. Following 30h of exposure to stress conditions (33°C and 1900μE/m2.s), anemones show a significant reduction in their Symbiodinium concentration followed by a progressive recovery over 8 weeks. Histological analyses show an increase in cell proliferation in both ectoderm and gastroderm tissues one day following the stress. This increased proliferation seems to be sustained after 3 weeks before returning to normal after 8 weeks. Moreover, our results show a progressive increase in the number of ectodermal mucocytes over 3 weeks before returning to a normal level after 8 weeks. While the new cells formed in the gastroderm would most likely host new Symbiodinium, the fate of new cells in the ectoderm is still not completely understood. These new cells may contribute to the increased number of mucocytes which could eventually help shift the feeding mode temporarily to a heterotrophic state until restoration of the symbiosis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAlternative photosynthetic electron pathways in different clades of Symbiodinium: the Mehler reaction
Roberty, Stéphane ULg; Poulicek, Mathieu ULg; Franck, Fabrice ULg

Poster (2010, December)

The high productivity of coral reef ecosystems is largely attributed to the mutualistic symbiosis between reef-building corals and their intracellular dinoflagellate in the genus Symbiodinium commonly ... [more ▼]

The high productivity of coral reef ecosystems is largely attributed to the mutualistic symbiosis between reef-building corals and their intracellular dinoflagellate in the genus Symbiodinium commonly referred to as zooxanthellae. These photosynthetic algae translocate a majority of their photosynthetically fixed carbon to the host and contribute greatly to their metabolic needs (Muscatine, 1990) and the calcification process (Gattuso, 1999). In the natural environment the holobiont have to cope with significant daily variations in light intensities that sometimes exceed Symbiodinium photosynthetic capacity. Fortunately, photosynthetic organisms possess regulatory features that help to ensure that high light intensities can be endured without the accumulation of photodamage. Thus, the regulation of photosynthesis can be viewed as a dynamic balance between photosynthetic efficiency (photochemical quenching) and photoprotection processes (i.e. non-photochemical quenching). Among them, the role of O2 as an alternative electron acceptor within the chloroplast could play a critical role (Ort & Baker, 2002). Under particular environmental conditions when sinks for photosynthetic electrons are scarce, the direct reduction of oxygen by the PSI could sustain significant levels of photosynthetic electron flux by initiating the ΔpH formation and of NPQ, regulating the ratio of ATP/NADPH to match the requirements of carbon reduction. However, this process leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species that are rapidly detoxified by superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase. An additional electron flux associated with this oxygen pathway is directed to the reduction of monodehydroascorbate (MDA), which is generated as a result of peroxide reduction by ascorbate (Asada, 2000). The present study aimed to highlight the existence of alternative photosynthetic electron pathways and more especially the Mehler ascorbate peroxidase pathway in different clades of Symbiodinium, cultivated at low and high light intensities. -Muscatine L (1990) The role of symbiotic algae in carbon and energy flux in reef corals. In: Dubinsky Z(ed) Ecosystems of the world: coral reefs. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp 1-9. -Gattuso JP, Allemand D and M Frankignoulle (1999) Photosynthesis and calcification at cellular, organismal and community levels in coral reefs: A review on interactions and control by carbonate chemistry. American Zoologist 39(1): 160-183. -Ort, D. R. and N. R. Baker (2002). A photoprotective role for O2 as an alternative electron sink in photosynthesis? Current Opinion in Plant Biology 5(3): 193-198. -Asada, K. (2000) The water-water cycle as alternative photon and electron sinks. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences 355(1402): 1419–1431. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSYMBIODINIUM SP. CAN STAY ALIVE THROUGH THE GUT AND IN THE FAECES OF CNIDARIA. PREDATORS. THE CASE OF CORALLIOPHILLA MEYENDORFFI AND ANEMONIA VIRIDIS.
Poulicek, Mathieu ULg; Roberty, Stéphane ULg; Plaza, Sylvain et al

Poster (2010)

The gastropod Coralliophilla meyendorffi is a common predator of the zooxanthellate anemone Anemonia viridis. Zooxanthella from the anemones are an important constitutent of the mollusc faeces. Cell ... [more ▼]

The gastropod Coralliophilla meyendorffi is a common predator of the zooxanthellate anemone Anemonia viridis. Zooxanthella from the anemones are an important constitutent of the mollusc faeces. Cell integrity, occurence of flagellated forms, live/dead proportions and mitotic index of Symbiodinium collected from the faeces and cultivated in vitro were examined and compared to that of algae in hospite. The results show that most algae withstand digestive processes of the predator, staying alive and dividing actively in the faeces. Motile (lagellated) algae arise from dividing cells and escape the fecal pellets. Impact on coral bleaching recovery is discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPhotoacclimation responses of a symbiotic sea anemone reveal an important host cellular plasticity
Roberty, Stéphane ULg; Fransolet, David ULg; Ladrière, Ophélie ULg et al

Poster (2010)

The high productivity of coral reef ecosystems is largely attributed to the mutualistic symbiosis between reef-building corals and their intracellular dinoflagellate in the genus Symbiodinium commonly ... [more ▼]

The high productivity of coral reef ecosystems is largely attributed to the mutualistic symbiosis between reef-building corals and their intracellular dinoflagellate in the genus Symbiodinium commonly referred to as zooxanthellae. These photosynthetic algae translocate a majority of their photosynthetically fixed carbon to the host and contribute to their metabolic needs and the calcification process. <i>Symbiodinium</i> must maintain a balance between the energy derived from the light reactions in the chloroplast and the amount of energy used during dark reactions and other metabolic processes. Nevertheless, in the natural environment the holobiont have to cope with daily and seasonal changes in light intensity, upsetting that balance and creating a stress that induces a physiological response (photoacclimation) to optimize growth rates. After a ten day exposition to high and very low light intensity, morphological and photophysiological analysis conducted on the symbiotic sea anemone, Anemonia manjano, reveal significant modifications of the host tissues ultrastructure and the Symbiodinium metabolic processes (photosynthesis, respiration). Those results highlight particularly important gastrodermal and ectodermal plasticity in which symbiotic cnidarians acclimate to the Symbiodinium physiological status (mainly photosynthesis) by varying the density of particular cellular types (e.g.: cnidocytes, gastrodermal cells) contained in their tissues. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIncreased mitosis in the bleached gastrodermis of the sea anemone A. pallida
Fransolet, David ULg; Roberty, Stéphane ULg; Plumier, Jean-Christophe ULg

Poster (2010)

Today, coral bleaching represents a major concern for marine biologists, especially considering the upsurge of this phenomenon possibly linked to climate change. Bleached corals, deprived of most of their ... [more ▼]

Today, coral bleaching represents a major concern for marine biologists, especially considering the upsurge of this phenomenon possibly linked to climate change. Bleached corals, deprived of most of their energy incomes, may show a partial or total mortality, which ultimately lead to shifts in reef communities. Studies focusing on cellular bleaching mechanisms have shown different ways by which algae may be expelled from gastrodermal host cells. Among those mechanisms, major emphasis has been put on host cell death, most probably due to both apoptosis and necrosis. Recovering gastrodermis is then expected to undergo regeneration process in order to be reinfected by new algae. We describe here this regeneration process in the bleached sea anemone model A. pallida. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe tropical sea anemone Aiptasia pallida as a lab model for the study of coral bleaching
Ladrière, Ophélie ULg; Roberty, Stéphane ULg; Baudesson, Charlotte et al

Poster (2008)

Bleaching is still among major events threatening coral reefs. New tools have to be developped to better understand the mechanisms leading to this pathology : we studied the use of the hermatypic anemone ... [more ▼]

Bleaching is still among major events threatening coral reefs. New tools have to be developped to better understand the mechanisms leading to this pathology : we studied the use of the hermatypic anemone Aiptasia pallida as experimental model for coral bleaching. Aiptasia appears as a good candidate as it is easy to maintain in aquarium and subjected to bleaching like corals. Both morphological and physiological approaches were performed to investigate the ultrastructure of the anemone tissues (TEM) and the zooxanthellae photophysiology (chlorophyll a fluorescence, respiration and pigmentation). Experiments under light and dark stress reveal that anemone tissues ultrastructure can be differently affected. In darkness, the ectoderm activity is reoriented to capture prey by increasing cnidocyte density. In contrast, intense light affects especially the gastroderm : intercellular spaces increase, the expulsion of intact algae in the gastric cavity and the degradation of zooxanthellae inside vacuoles seem to reduce the zooxanthellae density, chloroplast thylakoids lose their parallel arrangement. The analysis of the fluorescence induction curve appears as a powerful tool to analyse the physiological events series previous to bleaching. Although no significant zooxanthellae density reduction was observed, the decrease of pigments concentrations indicates that light or dark stresses induce anemone bleaching. Under strong light intensity, A. pallida zooxanthellae show an increased proportion of PSII QB non reducing, leading to partial photoinhibition. This phenomenon favours the ROS production that damages cellular structures of host and zooxanthellae. In darkness, there is no photosynthesis; anemones have therefore to find other feeding sources, as suggested by the ultrastructural approach. As the present results confirm some of those obtained on scleractinians, A. pallida can be regarded as a good model for coral bleaching studies and has numerous advantages for experimentation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (6 ULg)