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See detailRelationship between markers of blood oxidant status and physiological variables in healthy and heaves-affected horses after exercise
Kirschvink, Nathalie; Art, Tatiana ULg; de Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement (2002), 34

Exercise-induced oxidative stress is investigated as a potential performance-limiting factor in human sports medicine. Therefore, the present study aimed to assess whether physiological variables that ... [more ▼]

Exercise-induced oxidative stress is investigated as a potential performance-limiting factor in human sports medicine. Therefore, the present study aimed to assess whether physiological variables that change with exercise intensity were correlated with blood oxidant markers in healthy and heaves-affected horses. Seven healthy horses, 8 heaves-affected in remission and 7 heaves-affected in crisis performed a standardised exercise test (SET) of stepwise increasing intensity. Variables monitored during exercise were heart rate (HR), venous plasma lactate (LA), packed cell volume (PCV) and arterial oxygen tension (PaO2). Oxidant markers (uric acid [UA], 8-iso-PGF2alpha and reduced [GSH] and oxidised glutathione [GSSG]) were analysed in venous peripheral blood sampled at rest (R), at peak-exercise intensity (Emax), 15 (E15) and 60 (E60) min after SET. There was a significant effect of heaves on oxidant markers and, therefore, correlation analyses between physiological variables and oxidant markers were performed separately per horse group. In healthy horses, UA analysed at Emax was positively correlated with LA. Furthermore, GSH analysed at Emax and E15 was positively correlated with PaO2. In healthy and heaves-affected horses in remission, GSH and GSSG determined at Emax were negatively correlated with HR. There was no significant correlation between 8-iso-PGF2alpha and physiological variables. In conclusion, a correlation between the physiological response to exercise and some oxidant markers exists in healthy horses. However, in heaves-affected horses the blood oxidant status is probably more dependant on airway disease than on exercise. Future studies should be undertaken to assess whether antioxidant supplementation might positively influence the oxidant-antiodidant balance in exercising horses. [less ▲]

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See detailCorrelation between exercise parameters and oxidant markers in horses
Kirschvink, Nathalie; Art, Tatiana ULg; De Moffarts, Brieux et al

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (2002), 443

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See detailThe Use of Cardboard Bedding Material as Part of an Environmental Control Regime for Heaves-affected Horses: In Vitro Assessment of Airborne Dust and Aeroallergen Concentration and In Vivo Effects on Lung Function
Kirschvink, Nathalie; Di silvestro, F.; Sbai, Ilham ULg et al

in Veterinary Journal (2002), 163

This study aimed to test whether shredded cardboard is an appropriate minimum-dust bedding material for heaves-affected horses. Results of standardized in vitro measurement of airborne dust and ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to test whether shredded cardboard is an appropriate minimum-dust bedding material for heaves-affected horses. Results of standardized in vitro measurement of airborne dust and aeroallergen concentrations of cardboard bedding were significantly lower than those of common bedding materials. Six heaves-affected horses in clinical remission after pasturing were stabled for two months on cardboard bedding and fed grass silage. Pulmonary function tests (PFT: ventilatory mechanics, arterial blood gases, airway inflammation scoring, bronchoalveolar cytology) were performed before, during and after this period and after stabling the horses in poor hygienic conditions. PFT values measured during and after the stabling period on cardboard bedding were not significantly different from those recorded after the period at pasture or from those of healthy horses, but were significantly different from those recorded in poor hygienic conditions. On basis of the in vitro and in vivo results it can be concluded that cardboard bedding, used in conjunction with low-dust forage, may be appropriate in the provision of minimum-dust management of heaves-affected horses [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of nutritional antioxidant supplementation on systemic and pulmonary antioxidant status, airway inflammation and lung function in heaves-affected horses
Kirschvink, Nathalie; Fievez, Laurence ULg; Bougnet, V. et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2002), 34

An oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in favour of oxidants has been identified as playing a decisive role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Nutritional antioxidant supplementation ... [more ▼]

An oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in favour of oxidants has been identified as playing a decisive role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Nutritional antioxidant supplementation might reduce oxidative damage by enhancement of the antioxidant defence, thereby modulating inflammatory processes. In a placebo-controlled, blind study, it was tested whether a dietary antioxidant supplement administered for 4 weeks would improve lung function and reduce airway inflammation in heaves-affected horses. Eight horses in clinical remission of heaves were investigated at rest and after a standardised exercise test before and after treatment with an antioxidant supplement (consisting of a mixture of natural antioxidants including vitamins E and C and selenium from a variety of sources) or placebo (oatfeed pellets without additive). Pulmonary function and exercise tolerance were monitored; systemic and pulmonary lining fluid uric acid, glutathione and 8-epi-PGF(2alpha) were analysed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology and inflammatory scoring of the airways were performed. The antioxidant treatment significantly improved exercise tolerance and significantly reduced endoscopic inflammatory score. Plasma uric acid concentrations were significantly reduced, suggesting downregulation of the xanthine-dehydrogenase and xanthine-oxydase pathway. Haemolysate glutathione showed a nonsignificant trend to increase, while plasma 8-epi-PGF(2alpha) remained unchanged. Pulmonary markers and BAL cytology were not significantly affected by antioxidant supplementation. The present study suggests that the antioxidant supplement tested modulated oxidant/antioxidant balance and airway inflammation of heaves-affected horses [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of chronic airway inflammation and exercise on pulmonary and systemic antioxidant status of healthy and heaves-affected horses
Kirschvink, Nathalie; Smith, N.; Fievez, Laurence ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2002), 34(6), 563-571

In heaves-affected horses the relation between oxidant status, airway inflammation (AI) and pulmonary function (PF) is unknown. The oxidant status of blood and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) of ... [more ▼]

In heaves-affected horses the relation between oxidant status, airway inflammation (AI) and pulmonary function (PF) is unknown. The oxidant status of blood and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) of healthy (H, n = 6) and heaves-affected horses in clinical remission (REM, n = 6) and in crisis (CR, n = 7) was assessed at rest, during and after standardised exercise test by measurement of reduced and oxidised glutathione, glutathione redox ratio [GRR%]; uric acid and 8-epi-PGF2alpha. Oxidant status was related to PF parameters (mechanics of breathing and arterial blood gas tension) and Al parameters (bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL] neutrophil % and AI score). Haemolysate glutathione was significantly different between groups and was correlated with PF and AI parameters; GRR in PELF was increased during CR and was correlated with PF and AI parameters. Exercise induced an increase of plasma uric acid that was significantly higher both in REM and CR. PELF 8-epi-PGF2alpha was significantly increased in CR and correlated with PF and AI parameters. These results suggest that oxidative stress occurring in heaves is correlated with PF and AI and may be locally assessed by PELF glutathione status, uric acid and 8-epi-PGF2alpha. Systemic repercussions are reflected by assay of GSH in resting horses and by uric acid in exercising horses. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of 8-epi-Pgf2alpha on isolated bronchial smooth muscle of healthy and heaves-affected horses
Kirschvink, Nathalie; Art, Tatiana ULg; Lekeux, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (2001), 24(3), 215-221

8-Epi-PGF2alpha, a prostaglandin-like compound generated by oxidative stress, has been shown to be an in vitro bronchoconstrictor in airways from healthy laboratory animals and healthy humans, but it has ... [more ▼]

8-Epi-PGF2alpha, a prostaglandin-like compound generated by oxidative stress, has been shown to be an in vitro bronchoconstrictor in airways from healthy laboratory animals and healthy humans, but it has never been studied in diseased airways. Here, the bronchoconstrictive capacity of 8-epi-PGF2alpha on isolated bronchial rings (BR) of healthy and heaves-affected horses was evaluated by comparing the maximal effect and the potency of 8-epi-PGF2alpha to those of (1) acetylcholine (ACh), (2) its stereoisomer PGF2alpha and (3) its synthetic receptor agonist, U46619. Furthermore, the potential capacity of 8-epi-PGF2alpha to enhance the cholinergic (ACh) responsiveness of bronchial smooth muscle was investigated. 8-Epi-PGF2alpha contracted BR with a rank order of efficacy of Ach > U44619 > PGF2alpha > 8-epi-PGF2alpha in both healthy and heaves-affected horses. The contractile maximal response elicited by 8-epi-PGF2alpha was significantly smaller than that elicited by the other drugs, but was significantly higher in BR from heaves-affected horses than in those sampled in healthy horses, whilst pD2 values were similar. A subthreshold concentration of 8-epi-PGF2alpha (10-7 M) did not induce in vitro cholinergic hyper-responsiveness in BR of either healthy or heaves-affected horses. In conclusion, it has been demonstrated that 8-epi-PGF2alpha is an in vitro bronchoconstrictor of minor importance in healthy horses, but whose efficacy is significantly increased in heaves-affected horses. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of isoprostanes on bronchial smooth muscle in healthy and asthma-like horses
Kirschvink, Nathalie; Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine (2000), 161(3), 274

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See detailAssessment of muscle oxygenation in the horse by near infrared spectroscopy
Pringle, John; Roberts, C.; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2000), 32(1), 59-64

This study examined the ability of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to noninvasively determine changes to muscle oxygenation in the resting horse. Five horses had (NIRS) performed over extremity muscle ... [more ▼]

This study examined the ability of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to noninvasively determine changes to muscle oxygenation in the resting horse. Five horses had (NIRS) performed over extremity muscle while under general anaesthesia, first with 8 min limb ischaemia, then systemic hypoxaemia for 5 min. A second group of 6 awake horses had NIRS performed over extremity muscle while being administered hypoxic gas (F(I)O2 0.10) for 5 min, and after return to steady state, limb ischaemia was induced for an additional 5 min. In the anaesthetised horses' ischaemia induced marked and significant muscle deoxygenation of haemoglobin/myoglobin (P<0.01), with corresponding arterial saturation decreasing from 98.9 to 81.9%. Hypoxaemia induced small yet significant muscle deoxygenation (P<0.01) that was 3.2% of the ischaemia deoxygenation signal, with a corresponding decrease in arterial saturation from 98.6 to 90.4%. In the awake horses muscle deoxygenation was not detectable during hypoxia despite reduction of arterial saturation from 97.8 to 86.8%, whereas ischaemia induced rapid and significant deoxygenation of muscle (P<0.05), with corresponding reduction of venous saturation from 78.4 to 75.4%. In neither group of horses was there evidence of cytochrome aa3 reduction, despite complete ischaemia for up to 8 min. NIRS changes in the resting horse muscle clearly differed between ischaemia and hypoxaemia, and can readily show muscle deoxygenation in clinically relevant hypoxaemia in the horse under anaesthesia. Further, as the deoxygenation signal induced by ischaemia was clearly detectable above a background movement artefact, NIRS application to study of muscle oxygenation in the working horse should be explored. [less ▲]

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See detailNear infrared spectroscopy in large animals: optical pathlengh and influence of hair covering and epidemal pigmentation
Pringle, J.; Roberts, C.; Kohl, M. et al

in Veterinary Journal (1999), 158

The effects of epidermal pigmentation and hair covering on the relative transparency of various animal tissues to near infrared (NIR) light were examined, and the pathlengths of NIR light through tissues ... [more ▼]

The effects of epidermal pigmentation and hair covering on the relative transparency of various animal tissues to near infrared (NIR) light were examined, and the pathlengths of NIR light through tissues at four wavelengths in the NIR range were subsequently determined. Black hair covering and black or dark-coloured hooves prevented NIR light from penetration sufficient for conduction of pathlength or NIR spectroscopy measurements. Non-pigmented hair covering of the head did not appear to be a barrier to successful NIR light transmission. Tissues sufficiently transparent to NIR light had the differential pathlength factor (DPF, i.e. the ratio of the observed light pathlength and the geometric light source-detector separation) of NIR light determined by intensity modulated spectroscopy at the wavelengths 744, 806, 834 and 860 nm. Horse gluteal muscles had DPFs of 6.2, 6.2, 6.0, and 5.6, whereas forelimb muscles had DPF of 4.7, 4.4, 4.5 and 3.9 at the respective wavelengths. Sheep heads had DPF of 7.2 +/- 0.3, 5.8 +/- 0.5, 5.5 +/- 0.4 and 4.4 +/- 0.6 (+/- SEM) for the above respective wavelengths, of which the pathlengths all differed significantly from the other, except for between 806 and 834 nm, and 834 and 860 nm. The DPF of horse hooves were 4.8 +/- 0.1, 4.8 +/- 0.1, 4.7 +/- 0.1 and 4.4 +/- 0.1 (SEM) for the above noted wavelengths, of which the pathlength at 744 and 806 nm differed from the pathlength at 860 nm (P>0.05). These results show that NIRS is possible through lighter pigmented hair and epidermal tissues, and provide DPFs of horse feet and muscle and the sheep head that enables quantitative NIRS in these species. [less ▲]

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See detailBronchial hyperresponsiveness to isoprostanes in COPD horses ?
Kirschvink, Nathalie; Bureau, Fabrice ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Proceedings: Réunion de la Société Belge de Physiologie et de Pharmacologie Fondamentales et Cliniques (1999)

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See detailControl of chorionic obstructive pulmonary disease in the horse
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg; Roberts, C.

in British Veterinary Journal (The) (1996), 152

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See detailMechanics of breathing during strenuous exercise in Thoroughbred horses
Art, Tatiana ULg; Anderson, L.; Woakes, A. J. et al

in Respiration Physiology (1990), 82(3), 279-294

The changes induced by exercise on the mechanics of breathing, as well as the simultaneous changes occurring in arterial blood gas tensions and in respiratory gas exchange were investigated in 6 healthy ... [more ▼]

The changes induced by exercise on the mechanics of breathing, as well as the simultaneous changes occurring in arterial blood gas tensions and in respiratory gas exchange were investigated in 6 healthy thoroughbred horses, performing a treadmill exercise of increasing intensity. Respiratory airflow and tidal volume (VT) were measured with ultrasonic flowmeters. Pleural pressure changes were measured by an oesophageal balloon catheter. Gas concentration of the expired air was analysed with a mass spectrometer; the oxygen consumption (VO2) and the carbon dioxide output (VCO2) were computed breath-by-breath. Arterial blood gas values were obtained by sampling from the carotid artery. Between rest and fast gallop VT, respiratory frequency, expired minute ventilation (VE), VO2, VCO2, total pulmonary resistance (RL), mechanical work of breathing (Wrm) and PaCO2 increased significantly while PaO2 decreased significantly. The Wrm.VO2(-1) ratio in galloping horses increased exponentially with VE. This, together with the relationship between the changes in PaO2 and in PaCO2 and the increase in the ventilatory mechanics parameters, suggests that the mechanics of breathing may be one of the factors constraining further increase in ventilation in exercising healthy horses. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of increasing speed and incline on ventilation in thoroughbred horses exercising on a treadmill
Art, Tatiana ULg; Anderson, L.; Roberts, c et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1989), 97(5), 85

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