References of "Robaeys, G"
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See detailHepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection in Belgium: similarities and differences in epidemic and initial management
De Vroey, B; Moreno, C; Laleman, W et al

in European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology (2013), 25(5), 613-619

Introduction Nationwide studies comparing patients with hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) infections are mandatory for assessing changes in epidemiology. Aim The aim of this study was to compare ... [more ▼]

Introduction Nationwide studies comparing patients with hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) infections are mandatory for assessing changes in epidemiology. Aim The aim of this study was to compare epidemiological data and initial management of newly diagnosed patients with persistent HBV (HBsAg positive) or HCV (detectable HCV RNA) infection in Belgium. Patients and methods Data were extracted from two Belgian observational databases. Results A total of 655 patients (387 HBV and 268 HCV) were included. Compared with HCV patients, HBV patients were younger, more frequently men, more often of Asian or African origin (43 vs. 10%, P < 0.0001), and less frequently contaminated by transfusion or intravenous drug use (9 and 6% vs. 34 and 44%, P< 0.0001). Viral replication was assessed in 89% of HBV patients. Compared with HCV patients, HBV patients more frequently had normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (65 vs. 29%, P < 0.0001), less frequently underwent liver biopsy (29 vs. 67%, P < 0.0001), and were less often considered for antiviral therapy (25 vs. 54%, P < 0.0001). When taking only HBV patients with detectable viral replication into consideration, results remained unchanged. During the multivariate analysis, ALT was a major factor for performing liver biopsy or considering antiviral therapy in both groups. Conclusion HBV and HCV screening policies should be targeted toward immigrants and intravenous drug users, respectively. Guidelines recommending systematic search for viral replication should be reinforced in HBV patients. HBV patients less frequently underwent liver biopsy and were less often considered for antiviral therapy compared with HCV patients. Despite the lack of sensitivity and specificity, ALT remains a pivotal decision-making tool for liver biopsy and antiviral therapy in both infections. [less ▲]

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See detailHBV infection in Belgium: results of the BASL observatory of 1456 HBsAg carriers.
Deltenre, P.; Laleman, W.; Van Gossum, M. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2012), 75(1), 35-41

Introduction : Nationwide studies are mandatory to assess changes in the epidemiology of HBV infection in Europe. Aim : To describe epidemiological characteristics of HBsAgpositive patients, especially ... [more ▼]

Introduction : Nationwide studies are mandatory to assess changes in the epidemiology of HBV infection in Europe. Aim : To describe epidemiological characteristics of HBsAgpositive patients, especially inactive carriers, and to evaluate how practitioners manage HBV patients in real life. Methods : Belgian physicians were asked to report all chronically infected HBV patients during a one-year period. Results : Among 1,456 patients included, 1,035 (71%) were classified into one of four phases of chronic infection : immune tolerance (n = 10), HBeAg-positive hepatitis (n = 248), HBeAgnegative hepatitis (n = 420) and inactive carrier state (n = 357 HBeAg-negative patients with ALT < upper limit of normal (ULN) and HBV DNA < 2,000 IU/mL). Using less restrictive criteria for ALT (1-2 ULN) or HBV DNA (2,000-20,000 IU/mL), 93 unclassified patients were added to the group of inactive carriers. These 93 additional inactive carriers were younger, more frequently males, with similar risk factors for HBV infection and histological features compared to inactive carriers according to recent guidelines. Recent guidelines on management of HBV patients were generally followed, but systematic HBV DNA measurements and HDV coinfection screening should be reinforced. Conclusion : In Belgium, an inactive carrier state was a common form of chronic HBV infection. Using less restrictive criteria for classification of inactive carriers did not modify their main characteristics and seemed better adapted to clinical practice. Recent guidelines on management of HBV patients should be reinforced. [less ▲]

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See detailAre patients with HBV and HCV infection different? Comparison between 2 cohorts of newly diagnosed cases included in prospective registries of the Belgian Association for the Study of the Liver
De Vroey, B.; Moreno, C.; Laleman, W. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2011, March), 74(1), 21

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See detailGuidelines for the management of chronic hepatitis C in patients infected after substance use
Robaeys, G.; Buntinx, F.; Bottieau, E. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2005), 68(1), 38-45

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See detailTreatment of acute hepatitis C with interferon alpha-2b: early initiation of treatment is the most effective predictive factor of sustained viral response
Delwaide, Jean ULg; Bourgeois, N.; Gerard, Christiane ULg et al

in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (2004), 20(1), 15-22

AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of early interferon alpha-2b in non-post-transfusion acute hepatitis C virus: a prospective study with historical comparison. PATIENTS: Group A: 28 patients prospectively ... [more ▼]

AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of early interferon alpha-2b in non-post-transfusion acute hepatitis C virus: a prospective study with historical comparison. PATIENTS: Group A: 28 patients prospectively treated for acute hepatitis C virus with daily regimen of interferon 5 million units for 2 months. Group B: historical series of 16 patients with untreated acute hepatitis C virus. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to gender, age, icterus, alanine aminotransferase, or genotypes. In group B, hepatitis spontaneously resolved in three of 16 (19%) patients (follow-up 1-7 years). In group A, 21 of 25 patients became sustained viral responders (75%; P = 0.0003 vs. group B). Factors include not predictive of sustained viral response: age, gender, sources of infection, presence of icterus, alanine aminotransferase peak, bilirubin peak, incubation period, presence of hepatitis C virus antibodies at presentation, or genotypes. The time from presentation to the start of therapy was, however, significantly shorter in sustained viral responders (43 +/- 31 days) than in relapsers or non-responders (88 +/- 52 days) (P = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: Early treatment of acute hepatitis C virus with interferon prevents chronicity. A short waiting time from presentation to treatment appears as the most relevant predictive factor for sustained response. [less ▲]

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See detailHépatite C: dépistage, traitement et prévention. Recommandations pratiques-résumé
Brenard, R.; Michielsen, P.; Bourgeois, N. et al

in La Revue de la Medicine Generale (2003), 205

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See detailDaily induction combination treatment with alpha 2b interferon and ribavirin or standard combination treatment in naive chronic hepatitis C patients. A multicentre randomized controlled trial
Van Vlierberghe, H.; Leroux-Roels, G.; Adler, M. et al

in Journal of Viral Hepatitis (2003), 10(6), 460-466

The standard treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C is a 6-12-month combination therapy with interferon alpha and ribavirin. Induction treatment could result in a faster early decline of the ... [more ▼]

The standard treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C is a 6-12-month combination therapy with interferon alpha and ribavirin. Induction treatment could result in a faster early decline of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) load and a better response rate. Naive chronically infected HCV patients (n = 454) were randomized into two arms to receive either induction treatment with interferon alpha 2b 5 million units (MU) subcutaneously (s.c.) daily during a period of 8 weeks (arm A); or treatment with interferon alpha 2b 5 MU s.c. three times a week (TIW) for a period of 8 weeks (arm B). After week 8, interferon treatment in both arms was 3 MU s.c. TIW for a total period of 12 months. In both arms, ribavirin (1000-1200 mg orally per day) was added at week 4. Induction treatment resulted in a higher virological response at week 8 of treatment (66%vs 47%; P < 0.01). However, response at the end of treatment and at 6 months follow-up was not different (53%vs 50%, 41%vs 33%). The occurrence of adverse events and the drop-out rate were similar in both arms. Although an early virological response is observed more frequently in the induction treatment, end of treatment response and sustained responses did not differ. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis C: screening, treatment and prevention practical guidelines
Michielsen, P.; Brenard, R.; Bourgeois, N. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2003), 66(1), 15-19

The standard treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C is a 6-12-month combination therapy with interferon alpha and ribavirin. Induction treatment could result in a faster early decline of the ... [more ▼]

The standard treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C is a 6-12-month combination therapy with interferon alpha and ribavirin. Induction treatment could result in a faster early decline of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) load and a better response rate. Naive chronically infected HCV patients (n = 454) were randomized into two arms to receive either induction treatment with interferon alpha 2b 5 million units (MU) subcutaneously (s.c.) daily during a period of 8 weeks (arm A); or treatment with interferon alpha 2b 5 MU s.c. three times a week (TIW) for a period of 8 weeks (arm B). After week 8, interferon treatment in both arms was 3 MU s.c. TIW for a total period of 12 months. In both arms, ribavirin (1000-1200 mg orally per day) was added at week 4. Induction treatment resulted in a higher virological response at week 8 of treatment (66%vs 47%; P < 0.01). However, response at the end of treatment and at 6 months follow-up was not different (53%vs 50%, 41%vs 33%). The occurrence of adverse events and the drop-out rate were similar in both arms. Although an early virological response is observed more frequently in the induction treatment, end of treatment response and sustained responses did not differ [less ▲]

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See detailRisk factors for hepatitis C: past, present and future
Delwaide, Jean ULg; Bourgeois, N.; Colle, I. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2002), 65(2), 87-89

Patients at risk for hepatitis C (HCV) are those exposed to a major risk factor (i.e. blood transfusion prior 1990, and intravenous drug abuse), and those exposed to a minor risk factor (sexual, mother-to ... [more ▼]

Patients at risk for hepatitis C (HCV) are those exposed to a major risk factor (i.e. blood transfusion prior 1990, and intravenous drug abuse), and those exposed to a minor risk factor (sexual, mother-to-infant transmission, household contact, nosocomial contamination). The present paper aims to review the current and past modes of transmission of the virus C. [less ▲]

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See detailFactors inftuencing ribavirin-induced hemolysis
Van Vlierberghe, H.; Delanghe, J. R.; De Vos, M. et al

in Journal of Hepatology (2001), 34

BackgroundlAims: One of the major side eft'ects of the combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C is ribavirininduced hemolytic anemia. Little is known about variables inftuencing tbis anemia. Our study ... [more ▼]

BackgroundlAims: One of the major side eft'ects of the combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C is ribavirininduced hemolytic anemia. Little is known about variables inftuencing tbis anemia. Our study tried to search for these variables in a large group of patients with hepatitis C treated with the combination therapy. Methods: Two hundred and forty-four patients chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus were treated either with induction treatment (daily dose ofinterferon) or with a standard treatment (interferon thrice weekly). Both groups received 1000-1200 mg of ribavirin from week 4 until the end of the treatment. The drop in hemoglobin level was defined as the dift'erence between the pretreatment hemoglobin level and the hemoglobin level at week 8. Seventeen variables which could possibly influencê'this drop in hemoglobin level were examined. Results: After multivariate analysis, the drop in hemoglobin level was only significant influenced by pretreatment platelet level, treatment and haptoglobin phenotype. The ribavirin dose did not influence the drop in hemoglobin level or the early virological response. Conclusions: Ribavirin-induced hemolysis is inftuenced by the pretreatment platelet level, the administered amount of a-interferon and the haptoglobin phenotype. A careful search for the minimal dose of ribavirin needed in combination treatment is necessary. [less ▲]

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See detailTreatment of acute hepatitis C with interferon alpha 2b prevents chronicity.
Delwaide, Jean ULg; Bourgeois, N.; Gerard, Christiane ULg et al

in Gut (2000), 47(3), 14

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