References of "Rettinger, M"
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See detailObserved and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total column abundances
Kohlhepp, R; Ruhnke, R; Chipperfield, M P et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2012), 12(7), 3527--3556

Time series of total column abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl), chlorine nitrate (ClONO2), and hydrogen fluoride (HF) were determined from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra ... [more ▼]

Time series of total column abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl), chlorine nitrate (ClONO2), and hydrogen fluoride (HF) were determined from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra recorded at 17 sites belonging to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and located between 80.05°N and 77.82°S. By providing such a near-global overview on ground-based measurements of the two major stratospheric chlorine reservoir species, HCl and ClONO2, the present study is able to confirm the decrease of the atmospheric inorganic chlorine abundance during the last few years. This decrease is expected following the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, where restrictions and a subsequent phase-out of the prominent anthropogenic chlorine source gases (solvents, chlorofluorocarbons) were agreed upon to enable a stabilisation and recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. The atmospheric fluorine content is expected to be influenced by the Montreal Protocol, too, because most of the banned anthropogenic gases also represent important fluorine sources. But many of the substitutes to the banned gases also contain fluorine so that the HF total column abundance is expected to have continued to increase during the last few years. The measurements are compared with calculations from five different models: the two-dimensional Bremen model, the two chemistry-transport models KASIMA and SLIMCAT, and the two chemistry-climate models EMAC and SOCOL. Thereby, the ability of the models to reproduce the absolute total column amounts, the seasonal cycles, and the temporal evolution found in the FTIR measurements is investigated and inter-compared. This is especially interesting because the models have different architectures. The overall agreement between the measurements and models for the total column abundances and the seasonal cycles is good. Linear trends of HCl, ClONO2, and HF are calculated from both measurement and model time series data, with a focus on the time range 2000–2009. This period is chosen because from most of the measurement sites taking part in this study, data are available during these years. The precision of the trends is estimated with the bootstrap resampling method. The sensitivity of the trend results with respect to the fitting function, the time of year chosen and time series length is investigated, as well as a bias due to the irregular sampling of the measurements. The measurements and model results investigated here agree qualitatively on a decrease of the chlorine species by around 1%yr-1. The models simulate an increase of HF of around 1%yr-1. This also agrees well with most of the measurements, but some of the FTIR series in the Northern Hemisphere show a stabilisation or even a decrease in the last few years. In general, for all three gases, the measured trends vary more strongly with latitude and hemisphere than the modelled trends. Relative to the FTIR measurements, the models tend to underestimate the decreasing chlorine trends and to overestimate the fluorine increase in the Northern Hemisphere. At most sites, the models simulate a stronger decrease of ClONO2 than of HCl. In the FTIR measurements, this difference between the trends of HCl and ClONO2 depends strongly on latitude, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of five years (2003–2007) of SCIAMACHY CO total column measurements using ground-based spectrometer observations
de Laat, A. T. J.; Gloudemans, A. M. S.; Schrijver, H. et al

in Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (2010), 3(5), 1457--1471

This paper presents a validation study of SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) carbon monoxide (CO) total column measurements from the Iterative Maximum ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a validation study of SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) carbon monoxide (CO) total column measurements from the Iterative Maximum Likelihood Method (IMLM) algorithm using ground-based spectrometer observations from twenty surface stations for the five year time period of 2003–2007. Overall we find a good agreement between SCIAMACHY and ground-based observations for both mean values as well as seasonal variations. For high-latitude Northern Hemisphere stations absolute differences between SCIAMACHY and ground-based measurements are close to or fall within the SCIAMACHY CO 2σ precision of 0.2 × 1018 molecules/cm2 (~10%) indicating that SCIAMACHY can observe CO accurately at high Northern Hemisphere latitudes. For Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude stations the validation is complicated due to the vicinity of emission sources for almost all stations, leading to higher ground-based measurements compared to SCIAMACHY CO within its typical sampling area of 8° × 8°. Comparisons with Northern Hemisphere mountain stations are hampered by elevation effects. After accounting for these effects, the validation provides satisfactory results. At Southern Hemisphere mid- to high latitudes SCIAMACHY is systematically lower than the ground-based measurements for 2003 and 2004, but for 2005 and later years the differences between SCIAMACHY and ground-based measurements fall within the SCIAMACHY precision. The 2003–2004 bias is consistent with previously reported results although its origin remains under investigation. No other systematic spatial or temporal biases could be identified based on the validation presented in this paper. Validation results are robust with regard to the choices of the instrument-noise error filter, sampling area, and time averaging required for the validation of SCIAMACHY CO total column measurements. Finally, our results show that the spatial coverage of the ground-based measurements available for the validation of the 2003–2007 SCIAMACHY CO columns is sub-optimal for validation purposes, and that the recent and ongoing expansion of the ground-based network by carefully selecting new locations may be very beneficial for SCIAMACHY CO and other satellite trace gas measurements validation efforts. [less ▲]

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See detailTechnical Note: Harmonized retrieval of column-integrated atmospheric water vapor from the FTIR network - First examples for long-term records and station trends
Sussmann, R.; Borsdorff, T.; Rettinger, M. et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2009), 9(22), 8987-8999

We present a method for harmonized retrieval of integrated water vapor (IWV) from existing, long-term, measurement records at the ground-based mid-infrared solar FTIR spectrometry stations of the Network ... [more ▼]

We present a method for harmonized retrieval of integrated water vapor (IWV) from existing, long-term, measurement records at the ground-based mid-infrared solar FTIR spectrometry stations of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). Correlation of IWV from FTIR with radiosondes shows an ideal slope of 1.00(3). This optimum matching is achieved via tuning one FTIR retrieval parameter, i.e., the strength of a Tikhonov regularization constraining the derivative (with respect to height) of retrieved water profiles given in per cent difference relative to an a priori profile. All other FTIR-sonde correlation parameters (intercept = 0.02(12) mm, bias = 0.02(5) mm, standard deviation of coincident IWV differences (stdv) = 0.27 mm, R = 0.99) are comparable to or better than results for all other ground-based IWV sounding techniques given in the literature. An FTIR-FTIR side-by-side intercomparison reveals a strong exponential increase in stdv as a function of increasing temporal mismatch starting at Δt ≈ 1 minute. This is due to atmospheric water vapor variability. Based on this result we derive an upper limit for the precision of the FTIR IWV retrieval for the smallest Δt (= 3.75 min) still giving a statistically sufficient sample (32 coincidences), i.e., precision (IWVFTIR) < 0.05 mm (or 2.2 % of the mean IWV). The bias of the IWV retrievals from the two different FTIR instruments is nearly negligible (0.02(1) mm). The optimized FTIR IWV retrieval is set up in the standard NDACC algorithm SFIT 2 without changes to the code. A concept for harmonized transfer of the retrieval between different stations deals with all relevant control parameters; it includes correction for differing spectral point spacings (via regularization strength), and final quality selection of the retrievals (excluding the highest residuals (measurement minus model), 5% of the total). As first application examples long-term IWV data sets are retrieved from the FTIR records of the Zugspitze (47.4 °N, 11.0 °E, 2964 m a.s.l.) and Jungfraujoch (46.5 °N, 8.0 °E, 3580 m a.s.l.) NDACC sites. Station-trend analysis comprises a linear fit after subtracting an intra-annual model (3 Fourier components) and constructing an uncertainty interval [95 % confidence] via bootstrap resampling. For the Zugspitze a significant trend of 0.79 [0.65, 0.92] mm/decade is found for the time interval [1996 - 2008], whereas for the Jungfraujoch no significant trend is found. This confirms recent findings that strong variations of IWV trends do occur above land on the local to regional scale (≈250 km) in spite of homogeneous surface temperature trends. This paper provides a basis for future exploitation of more than a dozen existing, multi-decadal FTIR measurement records around the globe for climate studies. [less ▲]

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See detailNew multi-station and multi-decadal trend data on precipitable water. Recipe to match FTIR retrievals from NDACC long-time records to radio sondes within 1mm accuracy/precision
Sussmann, Ralf; Borsdorf, Tobias; Rettinger, M. et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2009), 11

We present an original optimum strategy for retrieval of precipitable water from routine ground-based midinfrared FTS measurements performed at a number globally distributed stations within the NDACC ... [more ▼]

We present an original optimum strategy for retrieval of precipitable water from routine ground-based midinfrared FTS measurements performed at a number globally distributed stations within the NDACC network. The strategy utilizes FTIR retrievals which are set in a way to match standard radio sonde operations. Thereby, an unprecedented accuracy and precision for measurements of precipitable water can be demonstrated: the correlation between Zugspitze FTIR water vapor columns from a 3 months measurement campaign with total columns derived from coincident radio sondes shows a regression coefficient of R = 0.988, a bias of 0.05 mm, a standard deviation of 0.28 mm, an intercept of 0.01 mm, and a slope of 1.01. This appears to be even better than what can be achieved with state-of-the-art micro wave techniques, see e.g., Morland et al. (2006, Fig. 9 therein). Our approach is based upon a careful selection of spectral micro windows, comprising a set of both weak and strong water vapor absorption lines between 839.4 – 840.6 cm-1, 849.0 – 850.2 cm-1, and 852.0 – 853.1 cm-1, which is not contaminated by interfering absorptions of any other trace gases. From existing spectroscopic line lists, a careful selection of the best available parameter set was performed, leading to nearly perfect spectral fits without significant forward model parameter errors. To set up the FTIR water vapor profile inversion, a set of FTIR measurements and coincident radio sondes has been utilized. To eliminate/minimize mismatch in time and space, the Tobin best estimate of the state of the atmosphere principle has been applied to the radio sondes. This concept uses pairs of radio sondes launched with a 1-hour separation, and derives the gradient from the two radio sonde measurements, in order to construct a virtual PTU profile for a certain time and location. Coincident FTIR measurements of water vapor columns (two hour mean values) have then been matched to the water columns obtained by integrating the best-estimate radio sonde profiles. This match was achieved via investigating the quality of the correlation plots between the columns derived from the radio sondes and the FTIR retrievals, and iteratively tuning the regularization strength of the FTIR retrieval. The FTIR regularization matrix is based on a Tikhonov operator which allows for empirical tuning of the regularization strength via one parameter. The figures of merit for the iterative tuning have been the slope, the intercept, and the regression coefficient of the correlation. By this way an optimum retrieval setting could be found, guaranteeing a response of the FTIR retrievals to true water vapor changes, which is matched to the radio sonde operation. As first examples for utilizing this approach to derive long-term trends of precipitable water from NDACC type long-term FTIR measurements, we present trends from two time series. I.e., one retrieved from continuous FTIR measurements at the NDACC Primary Station Zugspitze, Germany (47.42 °N, 10.98 °E, 2964 m a.s.l.), which covers the time span 1995-2009, and one from the International Scientific Station of the Jungfraujoch (ISSJ, 46.5°N, 8.0°E, 3580m a.s.l., Swiss Alps), covering the time span 1984 – 2009. A detailed trend analysis of both series via the bootstrap method will be presented. In ongoing work we apply this optimum retrieval approach to historical long-time measurement series of further selected FTIR stations of the NDACC network. Thereby we will obtain unprecedented new climate data via long term trends of precipitable water at a set of globally distributed locations. [less ▲]

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