References of "Remy, Bernadette"
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See detailEvaluation of serum osteocalcin and CTX-I in Ardenner horses with special reference to juvenile interphalangeal joint disease.
Pastoret, V.; Carstanjen, B.; Lejeune, Jean-Luc ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Medicine. A, Physiology, Pathology, Clinical Medicine (2007), 54(9), 458-63

The first aim of this study was to establish a profile of age-related normal serum concentrations of osteocalcin (OC) in Ardenner horses. For this first part, blood samples from 49 healthy Ardenner horses ... [more ▼]

The first aim of this study was to establish a profile of age-related normal serum concentrations of osteocalcin (OC) in Ardenner horses. For this first part, blood samples from 49 healthy Ardenner horses were collected. The second aim was to study two biochemical markers of bone metabolism, OC and a carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I), in 30 young Ardenner horses during 1 year. Amongst them, 17 showed lesions of juvenile degenerative joint disease in the distal forelimbs. A specific radioimmunoassay for equine OC was used to measure the serum concentration of the marker. The serum concentration of CTX-I was measured using a commercially available human assay validated for use in the horse. The effect of age, sex, season and health status (with or without lesions) was assessed. Levels of OC fall between birth and the adult stage: this decrease being most marked between birth and 1 year of age. This age-related decrease of OC was confirmed in the 30 young Ardenner horses, but CTX-I levels remained constant in this group. The Levels of the two markers changed significantly with the season with higher concentrations during the winter. No significant difference was shown either between the two sexes or between the two health statuses. [less ▲]

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See detailIntérêt de l'utilisation des substituts érythrocytaires
Deby, Ginette ULg; Remy, Bernadette ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in Actualités en réanimation et urgences (2001)

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See detailLa commission d'hemovigilance du CHU.
Baudoux, Etienne ULg; Blaffart, Francine ULg; Bouffioux, Christian ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2000), 55(9), 878-80

As suggested by the National Blood Council, a Hemovigilance Committee was set up in the University Hospital of Liege in 1995. A multidisciplinary discussion takes place on any action aiming at the ... [more ▼]

As suggested by the National Blood Council, a Hemovigilance Committee was set up in the University Hospital of Liege in 1995. A multidisciplinary discussion takes place on any action aiming at the improvement of transfusion safety, and the follow-up of its implementation. The first issue to be discussed was the set up of a detailed documentation of all blood transfusions. The data are now recorded on a single document allowing proper identification of people and products involved, and of the eventual incidents. This document has lead to a better transfusion safety and to an improved administrative management of blood transfusion. The Commission has been coordinating two multi-centric studies analyzing the consumption of fresh blood products and the incidence of transfusion reactions. Among blood-saving policies, autologous transfusion and volume reduction of samples drawn for laboratory purposes have been discussed. Other measures were taken to improve the labeling of samples for cross-mach and to actively follow-up transfusion reactions. By its actions and advises, the Commission aims to direct strategies towards a safe and rational use of blood products. [less ▲]

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See detailSubstituts des globules rouges: émulsions de fluorocarbures et solutions d'hémoglobine
Remy, Bernadette ULg; Deby, Ginette ULg; D'Ans, V. et al

in Annales Françaises d'Anesthésie et de Réanimation (1999), 18(2), 211-24

OBJECTIVE: To review the current data on perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions and haemoglobin (Hb) solutions. DATA SOURCES: For this paper we analysed the literature using Medline search along with major ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To review the current data on perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions and haemoglobin (Hb) solutions. DATA SOURCES: For this paper we analysed the literature using Medline search along with major review articles. DATA SELECTION AND EXTRACTION: The collected articles were reviewed and selected according to their quality and originality. DATA SYNTHESIS: PFCs are synthetic fluorinated hydrocarbons capable of dissolving, at increased FIO2, large amounts of oxygen. They deliver oxygen at tissular level, and are administered as emulsions containing particles of around 0.1 micron, reaching the smallest vessels. They are exhaled unchanged by the lungs within 7 days. The first clinically used PFC was Fluosol-DA 20%. Currently, Oxyfluor 40% and Oxygent 60% are under evaluation. PFCs are not true blood substitutes, but rather a means to support tissue oxygenation during extreme haemodilution. Solutions of free Hb do not require compatibility testing and are fully saturated with oxygen at ambient FIO2. Hb is either human, bovine or recombinant Hb. In order to maintain adequate intravascular half-life and affinity for oxygen, the Hb molecules are modified by internal cross-linking, polymerisation and encapsulation. After promising results using animal models, some of these modified Hb solutions are now undergoing phase III clinical trials. Among these, diaspirin cross-linked haemoglobin (DCLHb) has been tested in cardiac and orthopaedic surgery, as well as in trauma patients. The initial results of these multicentre trials are currently being analysed. [less ▲]

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See detailRed blood cell substitutes: fluorocarbon emulsions and haemoglobin solutions.
Remy, Bernadette ULg; Deby, Ginette ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in British Medical Bulletin (1999), 55(1), 277-98

The problems posed by transfusion of homologous blood have led to the development of substances able to replace the gas transporting properties of blood. Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) emulsions and modified ... [more ▼]

The problems posed by transfusion of homologous blood have led to the development of substances able to replace the gas transporting properties of blood. Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) emulsions and modified haemoglobin (Hb) solutions have been developed for this goal and are now tested in clinical assays. PFCs are synthetic fluorinated hydrocarbons, capable of dissolving large quantities of oxygen (O2; without binding) at high inspired concentrations of O2, and of delivering this O2 to the tissues. They are administered as emulsions containing particles with a diameter of approximately 0.2 micron, capable of entering the microcirculation. They are eliminated unchanged by the lungs within several days. Fluosol-DA 20% was the first PFC emulsion used in clinical practice. Currently, Oxygent, a second generation PFC emulsion, is being evaluated in clinical studies. The PFCs are not blood substitutes, but rather a means to ensure tissue oxygenation during extreme haemodilution. Solutions of free Hb do not have the antigenic characteristics of the blood groups, and do not require compatibility testing. They are fully saturated with O2 at ambient FiO2. The Hbs used are derived from either human or bovine sources, or via recombinant DNA technology. In order to maintain satisfactory intravascular half-life and O2 affinity, the Hb molecules are modified by adding internal crosslinks, by polymerization, and/or by encapsulation. After promising animal studies, several of these modified Hb solutions are now being studied in Phase III clinical trials. Among them, diaspirin cross-linked haemoglobin (DCLHb) has been used in cardiac and orthopaedic surgery, and for resuscitation of traffic accident victims. The initial results of multicentre trials are now being analysed. [less ▲]

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See detailApports et perspectives des dérivés de l'hémoglobine
Remy, Bernadette ULg; Deby, Ginette ULg; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in Schweizerische Medizinische Wochenschrift (1997), 127(25), 1088-96

Anoxia-reoxygenation leads to severe metabolic alterations, which result in a generalized inflammatory reaction and multiple organ dysfunction. Direct blood transfusion limits these alterations, but is ... [more ▼]

Anoxia-reoxygenation leads to severe metabolic alterations, which result in a generalized inflammatory reaction and multiple organ dysfunction. Direct blood transfusion limits these alterations, but is accompanied by risk of transmission of infections or viral diseases. To avoid these risks, "blood substitutes" have been designed. The modified hemoglobins are not true blood substitutes because they do not possess the complex functions of erythrocytes. They are only oxygen carriers, with a short intravascular life, adapted for temporary use. They are stable, devoid of toxicity and antigenicity, and are able to carry and deliver O2 without regulation of this oxygen transport and without chemical reaction with O2. They possess rheologic properties and an oncotic pressure like those of blood. The use of natural hemoglobin solutions, obtained after lysis of erythrocytes, remains "at risk" because these solutions easily form methemoglobin, increase the oncotic pressure, present renal toxicity, and possess a too high affinity for O2. For these reasons, 5 types of modified hemoglobin solutions have been designed, prepared from human or bovine hemoglobin or by genetic engineering. These hemoglobins are highly purified to eliminate trace amounts of stroma, lipids and endotoxins, which are responsible for acute toxicity. They are modified by internal cross-linking between the monomers, or by binding to macromolecules. Afterwards, they can be polymerized or encapsulated in liposomes. The purpose of these modifications is to modulate the affinity for O2 (by decreasing the binding of O2 and increasing its delivery to tissue), to reduce the dissociation into monomers and to guard against oxidation into methemoglobin. Encapsulation in liposomes allows co-encapsulation of effector molecules and protective substances. Genetic engineering allows the production of recombinant hemoglobin with selective modifications. The modified hemoglobin solutions are essentially used in hemorrhagic shock and perioperative hemodilution. Experimental work in animals has afforded good results: restoration of normal O2 pressure and no toxicity. These assays allow frequent observation of an unexpected rapid hypertensive effect, transient, reversible, and that could be controlled by antihypertensive drugs. The mechanisms of this hypertensive effect remain controverted (stimulation of endothelin production, inhibition of nitric oxide effects, etc.). In humans, studies with healthy volunteers have been completed, while phase II clinical studies are under way in hypovolemic shock, in major abdominal, orthopedic and cardiac surgery, in stroke and in intensive care patients after surgery. The detailed results are awaited, but the modified hemoglobin solutions already appear to be without toxicity and present the same hypertensive effect as observed in animals. However, until now only low doses have been used, and the catabolism of these solutions remains largely unknown. [less ▲]

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