References of "Remacle, Angélique"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVoice use among music theory teachers: A voice dosimetry and self-assessment study
Schiller, Isabel ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg; Remacle, Angélique ULg

in Journal of Voice (in press)

Objectives: (1) To investigate music theory teachers’ professional and extra-professional vocal loading and background noise exposure, (2) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and background ... [more ▼]

Objectives: (1) To investigate music theory teachers’ professional and extra-professional vocal loading and background noise exposure, (2) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and background noise, and (3) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and self-evaluation data. Methods: Using voice dosimetry, 13 music theory teachers were monitored for one workweek. Parameters analysed were voice SPL, F0, phonation time, vocal loading index (VLI) and noise SPL. Spearman’s correlation was used to correlate vocal loading parameters (voice SPL, F0 and phonation time) and noise SPL. Each day, subjects self-assessed their voice using visual analogue scales. VLI and self-evaluation data were correlated using Spearman’s correlation. Results: Vocal loading parameters and noise SPL were significantly higher in the professional than in the extra-professional environment. Voice SPL, phonation time and females’ F0 correlated positively with noise SPL. VLI correlated with self-assessed voice quality, vocal fatigue and amount of singing and speaking voice produced. Conclusions: Teaching music theory is a profession with high vocal demands. More background noise is associated with increased vocal loading and may indirectly increase the risk for voice disorders. Correlations between VLI and self-assessments suggest that these teachers are well-aware of their vocal demands and feel their effect on voice quality and vocal fatigue. Visual analogue scales seem to represent a useful tool for subjective vocal loading assessment and associated symptoms in these professional voice users. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVocal change patterns during a teaching day: Inter- and intra-subject variability
Remacle, Angélique ULg; Garnier, Maëva; Gerber, Silvain et al

in Journal of Voice (in press)

Objectives: To describe the mean voice changes of 22 female teachers during a typical workday, examine the inter- and intra-subject variability, and establish a typology of different voice patterns during ... [more ▼]

Objectives: To describe the mean voice changes of 22 female teachers during a typical workday, examine the inter- and intra-subject variability, and establish a typology of different voice patterns during the workday. Methods: For each participant, fundamental frequency (F0), harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR), jitter, and shimmer were measured on sustained vowels at the beginning and at the end of the workday, at three different times during the school year. Results: The group mean pattern showed significant increases in F0 and HNR during the workday and significant decreases in jitter and shimmer. However, considerable inter- and intra-subject variability was observed. Based on the variation in the acoustic parameters during the workday, three different voice patterns were identified. The first is characterized by a greater F0 increase during the day, interpreted as a common, appropriate adaptation to vocal load. The second is characterized by a greater increase in HNR during the day and greater decreases in jitter and shimmer, interpreted as hyperfunctional voice production. The third is characterized by greater decreases in F0 and HNR and greater increases in jitter and shimmer, suggesting acute inflammation or muscle fatigue following the workday. Conclusions: The observed variety of vocal patterns during the workday emphasizes the need to study this phenomenon individually and target different types of behaviors in order to develop tailored prevention and treatment methods. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailVoice use among music theory teachers
Schiller, Isabel ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg; Sfez, Lou et al

Conference (2017, August 30)

In Belgium, there is a particular group of music teachers referred to as music theory teachers. Working at music schools, they convey theoretical knowledge and practical musical skills to groups of ... [more ▼]

In Belgium, there is a particular group of music teachers referred to as music theory teachers. Working at music schools, they convey theoretical knowledge and practical musical skills to groups of individuals who learn music during their free-time. Even though music theory teachers use both speaking and singing voice intensively at work, little is known about their voice use profiles. This study investigated the vocal loading among French-speaking music theory teachers. Objectives were (1) to describe their professional and extra-professional vocal loading, (2) to determine the relationship between vocal loading and background noise level and (3) to investigate whether objectively measured vocal loading is reflected in music theory teachers’ auto-evaluation of their voice. Using voice dosimetry, 13 music theory teachers were monitored for one workweek. Parameters analysed were F0, voice sound pressure level (SPL), phonation time, vocal loading index (VLI) and background noise SPL. At the end of each monitoring day, subjects self-assessed their voice use by means of visual analogue scales. Results revealed (1) significantly higher vocal loading in the professional context than in the extra-professional context, (2) significant positive correlations between background noise level and the parameters F0, voice SPL and phonation time and (3) significant correlations between the VLI and auto-evaluation data (e.g. voice quality and vocal fatigue). These results highlight that teaching music theory is a profession with high vocal demands. At work, music theory teachers are exposed to high background noise, which seems to influence their voice use and may potentially contribute to the development of voice problems among this population. Visual analogue scales provide a promising tool to subjectively investigate vocal loading among music theory teachers. [less ▲]

Peer Reviewed
See detailVoice use among music theory teachers
Schiller, Isabel ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg; Sfez, Lou et al

Conference (2017, August)

In Belgium, there is a particular group of music teachers referred to as music theory teachers. Working at music schools, they convey theoretical knowledge and practical musical skills to groups of ... [more ▼]

In Belgium, there is a particular group of music teachers referred to as music theory teachers. Working at music schools, they convey theoretical knowledge and practical musical skills to groups of individuals who learn music during their free-time. Even though music theory teachers use both speaking and singing voice intensively at work, little is known about their voice use profiles. This study investigated the vocal loading among French-speaking music theory teachers. Objectives were (1) to describe their professional and extra-professional vocal loading, (2) to determine the relationship between vocal loading and background noise level and (3) to investigate whether objectively measured vocal loading is reflected in music theory teachers’ auto-evaluation of their voice. Using voice dosimetry, 13 music theory teachers were monitored for one workweek. Parameters analysed were F0, voice sound pressure level (SPL), phonation time, vocal loading index (VLI) and background noise SPL. At the end of each monitoring day, subjects self-assessed their voice use by means of visual analogue scales. Results revealed (1) significantly higher vocal loading in the professional context than in the extra-professional context, (2) significant positive correlations between background noise level and the parameters F0, voice SPL and phonation time and (3) significant correlations between the VLI and auto-evaluation data (e.g. voice quality and vocal fatigue). These results highlight that teaching music theory is a profession with high vocal demands. At work, music theory teachers are exposed to high background noise, which seems to influence their voice use and may potentially contribute to the development of voice problems among this population. Visual analogue scales provide a promising tool to subjectively investigate vocal loading among music theory teachers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailL’usage vocal des professeurs de formation musicale
Remacle, Angélique ULg; Schiller, Isabel ULg; Sfez, Lou et al

Conference (2017, June 29)

Introduction : En Belgique, les professeurs de formation musicale, ou professeurs de solfège, dispensent une éducation à la musique par un enseignement du langage musical. Plus précisément, ils enseignent ... [more ▼]

Introduction : En Belgique, les professeurs de formation musicale, ou professeurs de solfège, dispensent une éducation à la musique par un enseignement du langage musical. Plus précisément, ils enseignent l’apprentissage de la rythmique, de la lecture et de l’écriture de partitions, la pratique du chant, le développement de l’oreille musicale, ou encore la constitution d’un répertoire de référence. Ces enseignements sont dispensés dans des académies de musique ou des conservatoires. En tant que professionnels de la voix, ces professeurs font partie des travailleurs les plus à risque de consulter un phoniatre pour leur voix (1). Cependant, leur usage vocal reste peu décrit. Cette étude a pour objectif 1) de mesurer la charge vocale de professeurs de formation musicale en contexte professionnel et extra-professionnel, 2) de décrire l’influence du bruit ambiant sur leur voix et 3) d’identifier l’impact de la charge vocale sur leur qualité et leur fatigue vocale. Méthode : 13 professeurs de formation musicale (9 femmes, 4 hommes) ont été enregistrés pendant une semaine complète à l’aide d’un dosimètre vocal (VoxLog) porté du lever au coucher. Le dosimètre mesure la durée de phonation et la fréquence vocale (F0) avec un accéléromètre, ainsi que l’intensité de la voix et du bruit ambiant avec un microphone positionné au niveau du cou. L’analyse du signal est réalisée avec le logiciel VoxLog Discovery. Ce logiciel calcule notamment le nombre d’oscillations des plis vocaux par jour. A la fin de chaque journée, les professeurs ont auto-évalué leur qualité et leur fatigue vocale à l’aide d’échelles visuelles analogiques. Résultats : Les paramètres vocaux et le bruit ambiant sont significativement plus élevés en contexte professionnel qu’extra-professionnel (p<.001). L’élévation du bruit ambiant est accompagnée d’une élévation de l’intensité vocale pour les 13 professeurs (r=.61, p<.001), ainsi que d’une augmentation de F0 pour les femmes (r=.41, p=.002) mais non pour les hommes (r=.39, p=.055). Enfin, le bruit ambiant élevé est associé à une augmentation de la durée de phonation (r=.05, p<.001). L’augmentation du nombre d’oscillations journalier des plis vocaux est associée à une augmentation de la fatigue (r=0.438, p<.001) et à une diminution de la qualité vocale (r=-0.538, p<.001). Conclusion : De façon similaire aux professeurs d’école (2), les paramètres vocaux ainsi que le bruit ambiant sont significativement plus élevés en contexte professionnel. Sur leur lieu de travail, les professeurs d’éducation musicale sont confrontés à un bruit ambiant dépassant la limite recommandée par l’OMS (3). En accord avec l’effet Lombard, ce bruit élevé est associé à une augmentation de l’intensité vocale. Chez les femmes, une voix plus aigüe est observée en environnement bruyant. Comme dans l’étude de Ternström, Södersten et Bohman (4), un bruit ambiant élevé est associé à une durée de phonation plus importante, potentiellement dû à une prolongation des segments voisés par souci d’intelligibilité. En conclusion, les professeurs de formation musicale utilisent leur voix de manière intensive dans le cadre de leur travail, alternant voix parlée et voix chantée. Les corrélations entre le nombre d’oscillations journalier et les auto-évaluations montrent que la quantité de voix utilisée a un impact sur le ressenti des participants. De plus, l’élévation du bruit est corrélée à une augmentation des paramètres de charge vocale. Bibliographie 1. Remacle, A., Petitfils, C., Lejeune, L., Finck, C., & Morsomme, D. (2015, April 10). What is the professional profile of patients in phoniatrics? Oral communication presented at the 4th International Occupational Voice Symposium, London, UK. 2. Remacle, A., Morsomme, D., & Finck, C. (2014). Comparison of vocal loading parameters in kindergarten and elementary school teachers. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 57, 406-415. 3. Inserm. (2006). La voix : Ses troubles chez les enseignants (Expertise collective). Paris : Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche médicale. 4. Ternström, S., Södersten, M., & Bohman, M. (2002). Correlation of simulated environmental noise as a tool for measuring vocal performance during noise exposure. Journal of Voice, 16(2), 195-206. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailVoice dosimetry in music theory teachers
Schiller, Isabel ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg; Sfez, Lou et al

Conference (2017, March 28)

BACKGROUND: In Belgium, music theory teachers teach theoretical aspects of rhythm, singing and other music-related skills (such as pitch accuracy or singing in harmony) outside the regular school setting ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: In Belgium, music theory teachers teach theoretical aspects of rhythm, singing and other music-related skills (such as pitch accuracy or singing in harmony) outside the regular school setting. To date, their voice use and how it may be affected by background noise have hardly been studied. OBJECTIVES: 1) to determine the relationship between music theory teachers’ vocal loading and background noise and 2) to examine if the daily number of vocal fold vibration cycles (vocal loading index, VLI) is reflected in the teachers’ auto-evaluation of their voice. METHODS: A VoxLog voice dosimeter (Sonvox) was used to monitor 13 music theory teachers for one 6-day workweek from the early morning until late evening. Parameters analysed were fundamental frequency (F0, Hz), voice sound pressure level (SPL, dB), time dose (%), noise SPL (dB), and VLI. At the end of each monitoring day, subjects evaluated their voice quality, vocal fatigue, and amount of speaking and singing voice used by means of a visual analogue scale. RESULTS: Statistical analysis revealed positive correlations between noise SPL and F0, voice SPL and time dose. Correlations were also found between VLI and auto-evaluation data: a rise in VLI accompanied a decrease in self-perceived voice quality, an increase in vocal fatigue and an increase in the perceived amount of singing and speaking voice used. CONCLUSION: Three conclusions were drawn from the results. Firstly, vocal loading measured in music theory teachers is connected to the background noise level. Secondly, a great number of vibration cycles is associated with a self-reported increase in vocal fatigue and a lower general voice quality at the end of the day. Finally, correlations between the number of vibration cycles and the self-reported amount of voice use suggest that visual analogue scales are a reliable method to evaluate daily voice use. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (0 ULg)
See detailComment optimaliser sa voix dans le cadre de l'enseignement?
Morsomme, Dominique ULg; Remacle, Angélique ULg

Scientific conference (2017, March 07)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDescription of patients consulting the voice clinic regarding gender, age, occupational status, and diagnosis
Remacle, Angélique ULg; Petitfils, Cloé; FINCK, Camille ULg et al

in European Archives of Oto-rhino-laryngology : Official Journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) (2017), 274(3), 1567-1576

Purpose. To describe the gender, age, occupational status and diagnosis of dysphonic patients. Method. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 1079 patients examined at the Voice clinic of the ... [more ▼]

Purpose. To describe the gender, age, occupational status and diagnosis of dysphonic patients. Method. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 1079 patients examined at the Voice clinic of the University hospital of Liège in French-speaking Belgium. Results. Overall, seven out of 10 patients who attended the voice clinic for dysphonia were females. The patients’ ages ranged from 4 to 93 (mean=43.5). Females predominantly consulted at the age of 54 and males at the age of 9. Regarding the occupational status, workers represented more than half of our patients (53%), while 11.2% were unemployed, 15.4% were students, and 19.9% were retired. Regarding the diagnoses of the 1079 patients, nodules were the most common pathologies (n=182, 16.9% of the patients), prevailing in females (n=142, 18.8% of the females), encountered in 16.8% of the workers and 42.8% of the students consulting the voice clinic. Following nodules, laryngeal mobility disorders were diagnosed in 16.4% of the patients (n=177), mainly females (n=115), and was the most frequent diagnosis in retirees (n=75, 34.9%). Conclusions. The majority of the patients consulting the voice clinic for dysphonia were adult females, in their workforce, diagnosed with vocal nodules. The identification of the patients’ characteristics and diagnoses is important to develop treatments and prevention of dysphonia, estimate their costs, and allow comparisons across referral centers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (20 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailL’apport du biofeedback dans le traitement des troubles de la voix
Remacle, Angélique ULg; Boughabi, Loubna; Morsomme, Dominique ULg

in Joyeux, Nathaly; Topouzkhanian, Sylvia (Eds.) Actes des XVIèmes Rencontres internationales d’orthophonie: Orthophonie et technologies innovantes (2016, December)

It has recently become possible to monitor patients’ voices outside the speech therapist’s office with a portable, easy-to-use tool: the voice dosimeter. This tool measures voice frequency and sound ... [more ▼]

It has recently become possible to monitor patients’ voices outside the speech therapist’s office with a portable, easy-to-use tool: the voice dosimeter. This tool measures voice frequency and sound pressure level, as well as the duration of phonation, during a full day of regular activities. In addition to voice accumulation in an ecological context, the dosimeter used in this study (VoxLog, Sonvox) gives patients feedback on their voice use. In practice, the clinician configures the device so that it provides a vibratory signal in real time when the patient speaks above or below a predetermined frequency or sound pressure threshold. The feedback is intended to make patients aware of inappropriate vocal behavior and encourage them to change it. In this case study, we used biofeedback with the aim of reducing sound pressure level for a teacher suffering from vocal fold nodules. Our goal was to determine whether vibrotactile biofeedback applied in an ecological context for three consecutive weeks could reduce excess sound pressure. The feedback was activated every time the teacher spoke too loudly; its purpose was to help her avoid vocal abuse and (re)learn healthy vocal behaviors. This preliminary study generated encouraging results regarding the use of biofeedback in voice treatment. Nevertheless, it is important to investigate how this tool can best be implemented for patient management in speech language pathology. In addition, the method should be validated with randomized studies using a larger sample. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 155 (21 ULg)
See detailDo teachers speak too much?
Remacle, Angélique ULg

Scientific conference (2016, October 21)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailProfessionnels de la voix : Comment optimiser votre outil de travail ?
Remacle, Angélique ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

La voix, faiseuse de sons et génératrice de relation, appartient à un univers riche et complexe, longtemps méconnu. Instrument de travail et de communication souvent malmené, la voix est considérée comme ... [more ▼]

La voix, faiseuse de sons et génératrice de relation, appartient à un univers riche et complexe, longtemps méconnu. Instrument de travail et de communication souvent malmené, la voix est considérée comme un dû. La plupart d’entre nous l’utilisent en aveugle…Les usages que nous en faisons sont multiples. Ils dépendent autant de notre appétence à la vocalisation que de notre facilité ou non à accéder à un geste vocal harmonieux. Les bavards parlent à tort et à travers, les timides se taisent, tandis que les insatisfaits convoitent la voix des autres. Certains encore courtisent leur voix et, fascinés, guettant la moindre de ses faveurs, rêvent d’en devenir les maîtres. C’est souvent le cas chez les professionnels de la voix, tels les comédiens, les chanteurs et les enseignants. L’intérêt que nous lui portons parle de nous-mêmes…Tout comme notre corps dont elle est l’émanation sonore, la voix, fonction magique, grandit, se fortifie puis vieillit… Elle peut s’altérer, se fatiguer, changer, nous abandonner. La santé vocale existe. Qui l’eut dit ? Par la complexité de son anatomie et les particularités de sa physiologie, la voix révèle nombre de curiosités inédites dont la connaissance éclaire bien au-delà de ce que nous pourrions penser.Qu’est-ce que la voix ? Comment fonctionne-t-elle ? Peut-on se prémunir de ses défaillances ? Professionnels de la voix, comment gérer la charge vocale qui est la vôtre ? Qu’est-ce que le forçage vocal et comment l’éviter ? Comment grandir en confort vocal et quels sont les grands principes d’hygiène vocale ? Quelles pratiques pour vous aider à mieux connaître votre capital voix ? La méthode Feldenkrais : en quoi peut-elle nous aider à développer notre santé vocale ?Mercredi 12 octobre à partir de 14h30, la Journée de la voix MGEN vous invite en région grenobloise à un moment d’exception : communications scientifiques dispensées par des spécialistes nationaux renommés alterneront avec de brillants intermèdes artistiques ! Éducation vocale des professionnels et bonnes pratiques seront au coeur des propos ! [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailFéminiser la voix
Morsomme, Dominique ULg; Remacle, Angélique ULg

in De la voix parlée au chant: Bilans, rééducations, pathologies de la voix parlée et chantée (2016)

Dans ce chapitre, nous présentons la voix du point de vue du genre. En effet, l’Unité Logopédie de la Voix (www.logopedie-voix.be) s’intéresse entre autres à la féminisation vocale chez les personnes ... [more ▼]

Dans ce chapitre, nous présentons la voix du point de vue du genre. En effet, l’Unité Logopédie de la Voix (www.logopedie-voix.be) s’intéresse entre autres à la féminisation vocale chez les personnes transidentitaires, en processus de changement de genre. Ces personnes ne s’identifiant pas au sexe et au genre qui leur ont été attribués à la naissance, elles éprouvent un désir profond de vivre comme une personne du sexe opposé à leur sexe biologique. Lors du processus de transition où ont lieu les transformations nécessaires au changement de genre, l'orthophonie a pour but d’améliorer la cohérence entre l’apparence de la personne et sa voix. Ainsi, notre recherche se focalise sur ce qui distingue la voix féminine de la voix masculine. Nous visons à développer des stratégies de féminisation vocale, portant sur des paramètres tels que la fréquence fondamentale de la voix, les formants, les contours intonatifs, le débit de parole, le rythme, ou encore le vocabulaire choisi. Féminiser une voix, c’est chercher à comprendre ce qui permet d’en identifier le genre, mais également participer à la construction de l’identité de la personne à part entière. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 186 (40 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLe repos vocal : Pourquoi, comment, et dans quelles circonstances ?
Remacle, Angélique ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg

in De la voix parlée au chant: Bilans, rééducations, pathologies de la voix parlée et chantée (2016)

Régulièrement recommandé à des fins préventives ou curatives, le repos vocal favorise la récupération dans différentes circonstances. Bon nombre de phonochirurgiens l’incluent dans les soins ... [more ▼]

Régulièrement recommandé à des fins préventives ou curatives, le repos vocal favorise la récupération dans différentes circonstances. Bon nombre de phonochirurgiens l’incluent dans les soins postopératoires, avant une éventuelle prise en charge orthophonique. Le repos vocal permet également de résorber une simple fatigue ressentie suite à un usage intensif ou inhabituel de la voix, ou peut faire l’objet d’une indication thérapeutique dans le cadre de lésions consécutives aux phonotraumatismes. Compte tenu du manque de données scientifiques et de la diversité des pratiques sur le sujet, il n’est pas toujours aisé de donner des indications claires aux patients, souvent réticents à l’idée de ne pas pouvoir utiliser leur voix pendant une durée prolongée. Basé sur des recherches récentes et sur des expériences cliniques, ce chapitre permet de mieux comprendre l’intérêt du repos vocal et suggère des lignes de conduites quant à la manière de l’organiser [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 333 (23 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailQuelles réponses face à la fatigue vocale? Variabilité inter-individuelle des modifications acoustiques de la voix au cours de la journée
Remacle, Angélique ULg; Gerber, Silvain; Garnier, Maëva

Poster (2016, September 26)

Objectifs: 1) décrire l’évolution de 4 indicateurs acoustiques de la fatigue vocale au cours d’une journée de travail et examiner leur universalité dans l'échantillon, 2) déterminer si différentes ... [more ▼]

Objectifs: 1) décrire l’évolution de 4 indicateurs acoustiques de la fatigue vocale au cours d’une journée de travail et examiner leur universalité dans l'échantillon, 2) déterminer si différentes typologies de réponse à la fatigue vocale peuvent être distinguées. Population: 22 enseignantes enregistrées le matin et le soir après leur journée de travail, à 3 temps de l’année: octobre, décembre, et février. Tâche: voyelle [a] tenue produite 5 fois à intensité et fréquence confortables. Paramètres mesurés avec Praat et moyennés sur les 5 répétitions: F0 (Hz), rapport harmoniques/bruit (HNR, dB), local Jitter (%), et local Shimmer (%). Les variations des moyennes entre le soir et le matin (Δ) sont calculées pour chaque paramètre. Résultats: En accord avec la littérature, le Δ moyen pour les 22 participantes aux 3 temps montre une augmentation de F0 et HNR, et une diminution de Jitter et Shimmer au cours de la journée. Cependant, ces résultats ne sont pas généralisés dans notre échantillon. Une analyse hiérarchique ascendante permet d'identifier 3 typologies de réponse à la fatigue vocale, observées suite à la journée de travail. Typologie 1: tendance inverse à la littérature (ΔF0 et ΔHNR négatifs, Δjitter et Δshimmer positifs). Comportement hypofonctionnel en réponse à la fatigue vocale. Typologie 2: tendance et amplitude similaires à la littérature (ΔF0 et ΔHNR positifs, Δjitter et Δshimmer négatifs). Réponse attendue, adaptation saine à la fatigue vocale. Typologie 3: tendance similaire à la littérature mais d’amplitude très marquée. Comportement hyperfonctionnel, suspicion d’un trouble vocal. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (9 ULg)
See detailLa voix de l'enseignant
Remacle, Angélique ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

Cette formation sur la voix destinée aux enseignants se veut théorique et pratique. Elle aborde les points suivants: 1) les bases d'anatomie et principes de fonctionnement de la voix, 2) les ... [more ▼]

Cette formation sur la voix destinée aux enseignants se veut théorique et pratique. Elle aborde les points suivants: 1) les bases d'anatomie et principes de fonctionnement de la voix, 2) les professionnels de la voix, 3) que faire quand la voix dysfonctionne, et 4) comment optimiser la voix? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNormative data on teachers’ voice use in real-life situations
Schiller, Isabel ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg; Alcoulombre, Anaëlle et al

Conference (2016, August 25)

Background As part of their working routine, teachers use their voice for extended periods of time. To compensate for adverse acoustic conditions and background noise, they are also required to speak at ... [more ▼]

Background As part of their working routine, teachers use their voice for extended periods of time. To compensate for adverse acoustic conditions and background noise, they are also required to speak at high intensities. Since teaching is acknowledged to be vocally demanding, several studies have investigated teachers’ vocal load, that is, the stress inflicted on the larynx during vocalization, which is thought to be influenced by duration, intensity and frequency of phonation. A promising method for analyzing teachers’ phonatory behavior in real-life situations is the use of a portable voice dosimeter that objectively documents vocal parameters. Depending on several factors, those parameters may vary within the teaching profession (Masuda et al., 1993; Morrow and Connor, 2011; Remacle, Morsomme, and Finck, 2014). With the aim of quantifying their vocal parameters and identifying the most at-risk teaching conditions, we have established a large database of French-speaking teachers. Based on this database, this study analyzed vocal loading differences with regard to gender, teaching level, and environment (professional versus extra-professional). Methods Seventy-six French-speaking teachers (15 males and 61 females) were monitored during one workweek using the Ambulatory Phonation Monitor voice dosimeter (KayPENTAX). The subjects included 21 kindergarten, 20 primary and 35 secondary school teachers. All male subjects were in the latter group. The vocal parameters analyzed were phonation time, intensity and fundamental frequency (F0). Results The statistical analysis revealed that, irrespective of gender, phonation time, F0 and intensity level were significantly higher in the professional environment than the extra-professional environment (p<.01). Among female subjects, the F0 of kindergarten teachers was significantly higher than that of primary school teachers, which in turn was higher than that of secondary school teachers (p<.01). The phonation time and intensity were also higher in female kindergarten teachers than other female teachers, but this difference did not reach significance. As expected, regarding gender differences, we found that female secondary school teachers spoke with significantly higher F0 than their male colleagues (p<.001). In the extra-professional setting, they also spoke with a significantly higher intensity (p<.05), but no such effect was found in the professional environment. Conclusion Overall, our subjects showed an increase in vocal loading parameters when they were at work compared to their free time. This confirms the results of earlier studies and demonstrates that teaching is an occupation with remarkably high vocal demands. The analysis of mean frequency showed that lower school levels were associated with higher-pitched voice. It can be assumed that kindergarten teachers adapt to the higher F0 of their young pupils and that their effort to maintain the pupils’ attention results in greater frequency variations. References Masuda, T., Ikeda, Y., Manako, H., & Komiyama, S. (1993). Analysis of vocal abuse: Fluctuations in phonation time and intensity in 4 groups of speakers. Acta Oto-Laryngologica, 113(3), 547–552. Morrow, S. L., & Connor, N. P. (2011). Comparison of voice-use profiles between elementary classroom and music teachers. Journal of Voice, 25(3), 367–372. Remacle, A., Morsomme, D., & Finck, C. (2014). Comparison of vocal loading parameters in kindergarten and elementary school teachers. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 57(2), 406–415. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe influence of background noise on vocal loading parameters in music theory teachers
Schiller, Isabel ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg; Sfez, Lou et al

Poster (2016, August 23)

Background: Music theory teachers, who teach rhythm, singing and other music-related skills and topics, depend greatly on a well-functioning voice. Unlike other schoolteachers, who primarily use their ... [more ▼]

Background: Music theory teachers, who teach rhythm, singing and other music-related skills and topics, depend greatly on a well-functioning voice. Unlike other schoolteachers, who primarily use their voice as a pedagogic tool, music theory teachers also use it as an instrument. Furthermore, they often engage in vocally demanding free-time activities requiring a singing voice. To date, few studies have specifically looked at the voice use of music theory teachers. This study aims (1) to measure the background noise level and the amount of vocal loading affecting this specific population, and (2) to describe the influence of background noise on vocal loading parameters. Methods: Thirteen French-speaking music theory teachers (9 females and 4 males) working in a music school were monitored for one workweek, using the VoxLog voice dosimeter (Sonvox). To investigate the professional and extra-professional environments, all subjects wore the dosimeter from early morning until the end of the day. The parameters analysed were background noise level, duration of phonation, sound pressure level (SPL) and fundamental frequency (F0) of voice. Results: Overall, the mean background noise level was 75.2 dB (SD=5.4). We measured higher background noise level at work (mean=78.2 dB, SD=5.8) than in the extra-professional environment (mean=72.2 dB, SD=5.2). As expected, a rise in background noise was accompanied by a significant rise in voice SPL in both males and females (r=.61, p<.001). A significant correlation between background noise and F0 was found in females (r=.41, p=.002), but not in males (r=.39, p=.055). Furthermore, our data exhibit a significant correlation between background noise and duration of phonation (r=.05, p<.001). Conclusion: Our data suggest, that in class, music theory teachers must cope with background noise levels that dramatically exceed the limit of 35 dB recommended by the WHO (Inserm, 2006). High background noise levels lead to an increase in voice SPL, a phenomenon known as the Lombard effect (Inserm, 2006). In female subjects, we also observed a rise in F0 further to high background noise. Like Ternström, Södersten, and Bohman’s (2002) study, our data indicate that high background noise levels increase the duration of phonation. In a noisy environment, subjects seem to prolong the voiced segments of speech to make themselves understood. In other words, high background noise levels result in higher vocal loading. In the long run, this may increase the risk of voice disorders such as hyperfunctional dysphonia or vocal fold pathologies consecutive to repeated microtrauma in music theory teachers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (2 ULg)
See detailLe repos vocal: état actuel des connaissances et indications thérapeutiques
Remacle, Angélique ULg

Scientific conference (2016, June 10)

Le repos vocal consiste à modérer (repos relatif) ou éviter (repos absolu) l’utilisation de la voix sous toutes ses formes. Régulièrement recommandé à des fins préventives ou curatives, il favorise la ... [more ▼]

Le repos vocal consiste à modérer (repos relatif) ou éviter (repos absolu) l’utilisation de la voix sous toutes ses formes. Régulièrement recommandé à des fins préventives ou curatives, il favorise la récupération et la cicatrisation tissulaire dans différentes circonstances. Par principe de précaution, bon nombre de phonochirurgiens l’incluent dans les soins postopératoires. Le repos vocal permet également de résorber une simple fatigue ressentie suite à un usage intensif ou inhabituel de la voix, ou peut faire l’objet d’une indication thérapeutique dans le cadre de pathologies bénignes consécutives aux phonotraumatismes. A l’heure actuelle, l’impact du repos sur la cicatrisation reste controversé. Les chercheurs en sa faveur avancent que la mise au repos protège les plis vocaux des traumatismes susceptibles de maintenir l’inflammation, favorise la réparation tissulaire et évite les cicatrices. A l’inverse, certains travaux soulèvent que l’inactivité vocale pourrait ralentir la réparation tissulaire et serait même défavorable à la cicatrisation. Ces études postulent que la vibration contribue à la réorganisation des fibres tissulaires et que l’absence de mobilisation favoriserait les cicatrices cordales. Enfin, les détracteurs du repos avancent que l’inactivité des plis vocaux engendre la stagnation de mucus sur le plan glottique, responsable de toux et de hemmage Compte tenu du manque de données scientifiques et de la diversité des pratiques sur le sujet, il n’est pas toujours aisé de donner des consignes claires aux patients, souvent réticents à l’idée de ne pouvoir utiliser leur voix pendant une durée prolongée. Dans le but de donner des indications cliniques, cette présentation décrit l’intérêt et les potentiels inconvénients du repos vocal, et elle suggère des lignes de conduites quant à la manière de le mettre en place. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (0 ULg)
See detailUsage de la voix par les enseignants du premier degré et prévention de leurs troubles vocaux
Garnier, Maëva; Gerber, Silvain; Pétillon, Caroline et al

Scientific conference (2016, June 02)

Contexte : Les enseignants sont nombreux à ressentir une fatigue vocale ou des troubles de la voix (maux de gorge, enrouement, extinction de voix). Les femmes, en particulier celles enseignant en primaire ... [more ▼]

Contexte : Les enseignants sont nombreux à ressentir une fatigue vocale ou des troubles de la voix (maux de gorge, enrouement, extinction de voix). Les femmes, en particulier celles enseignant en primaire et maternelle, sont les plus touchées. Leurs problèmes vocaux apparaissent généralement durant leurs premières années d’expérience, et peuvent dans certains cas devenir chroniques et mener à des lésions sur les cordes vocales comme les nodules. Jusqu’à présent, peu d’enseignants bénéficient d’une formation vocale avant le début de leur carrière. Lorsque des conseils de préventions sont donnés, ceux-ci consistent le plus souvent en recommandations d’hygiène vocale et en techniques vocales de base (relaxation, respiration, posture, recherche de résonance) dont l’applicabilité en situation réelle d’enseignement n’est pas toujours évidente. Objectifs : En collaboration avec la MGEN et l’académie de Grenoble, nous avons mené une étude longitudinale sur 22 enseignantes en classes maternelles et primaires, avec quatre principaux objectifs : 1) Mettre au point un programme de prévention plus pratique que théorique, apprenant aux enseignantes à mieux gérer leur voix au cours d’ateliers et de jeux de rôles simulant des situations types d’une journée d’enseignement en primaire-maternelle. 2) Examiner l’applicabilité, en situation réelle d’enseignement, de ces conseils de prévention et leur efficacité, en terme d’évolution de la fatigue vocale au cours d’une journée de travail et au cours de l’année. 3) Explorer plus en détails les usages vocaux, les situations pédagogiques et les différentes contraintes rencontrées par les enseignants du 1er degré au cours de leurs journées de travail 4) Mettre au point un nouveau programme de formation vocale plus spécifiquement adapté aux contraintes et situations vécues par les enseignants du 1er degré, et permettant par conséquent une meilleure applicabilité des conseils en situation réelle d’enseignement. Méthode : La moitié des participantes a bénéficié d’une journée de formation en Octobre 2013 dispensée par la phoniatre Jocelyne Sarfati (groupe « test »), tandis que l’autre moitié n’a suivi aucune formation (groupe « contrôle »). Sur les 5 mois suivant la formation, l’ensemble des participantes des deux groupes ont été suivies au cours de 3 rendez-vous (début octobre, mi-décembre, début février) où nous sommes allées les enregistrer à leur école, pendant toute leur journée d’enseignement. Nous leur avons fourni un microphone serre-tête (Shure WH20TQG) et un mini-enregistreur portable (Zoom H1) de façon à enregistrer leur voix. Nous leur avons également fourni une caméra, placée en fond de classe, de façon à filmer leur comportement, posture et déplacements pendant 1 heure de la journée qu’elles jugeaient particulièrement difficile à gérer vocalement. En complément de ces enregistrements in situ, nous les avons également enregistrées le matin et le soir, avant et après leur journée de travail, sur un court protocole (voyelles tenues, lecture d’un texte) et leur avons demandé de remplir un questionnaire d’auto-évaluation de leur fatigue vocale (type Voice Handicap Index). Résultats : Les analyses des questionnaires et vidéos ont montré que les participantes à la journée de formation appliquaient la plupart des conseils en situation de classe (postures, évitement des situations d’effort vocal, etc.). Des mesures objectives ont également montré qu’au cours de l’année, le débit de parole est moins élevé et les pauses sont plus nombreuses chez les enseignants ayant reçu le programme de prévention que dans le groupe test. Les réponses aux questionnaires ont également montré que la fréquence des plaintes était moins élevée pour le groupe ayant participé à la journée de prévention, particulièrement dans des situations ou des lieux requérant un usage intensif de la voix, comme les grands espaces (couloirs, cour de récréation ou gymnases). Enfin, l’analyse des descripteurs acoustiques (intensité, hauteur, stabilité, quantité d’air sur la voix) a montré une légère dégradation de la voix au cours de l’année, moins marquée chez les enseignantes qui avaient suivi la formation. Par ailleurs, nous avons pu observer que l’usage de la voix à intensité élevée était très fréquemment relié à des situations de gestion de classe (réduction du bruit de fond, rappel à l’ordre, …). Conclusions : Ce programme de prévention, combinant des méthodes directes et indirectes, semble donc déjà avoir un impact positif sur la fatigue vocale et engendrer des habitudes et comportements favorables à la santé vocale. Cependant, il semble utile de continuer à développer des programmes de prévention en relation plus étroite avec les méthodes pédagogiques et de gestion de classe, pour faciliter l’application des conseils de prévention. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (11 ULg)
See detailLa voix : Vecteur d'émotions et de savoirs
Remacle, Angélique ULg

Scientific conference (2016, May 21)

La voix est le principal support de la communication humaine. Elle constitue un élément de notre identité en révélant nos émotions, tout en étant un outil de travail essentiel pour l’enseignant. Au ... [more ▼]

La voix est le principal support de la communication humaine. Elle constitue un élément de notre identité en révélant nos émotions, tout en étant un outil de travail essentiel pour l’enseignant. Au quotidien, santé et confort vocal sont indispensables pour permettre à l’enseignant d’exercer dans des conditions optimales et d’assurer l’efficacité en pédagogie. Cette intervention a pour objectif d’aider les (futurs) enseignants à comprendre cet outil professionnel qu'est la voix, afin de mieux le maitriser dans l’action mais aussi de le préserver tout au long de leur carrière. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (2 ULg)