References of "Reginster, Jean-Yves"
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See detailAge-standardized quality of life after hip or knee arthoplasty.
Neuprez, Audrey ULg; KURTH, William ULg; THIRION, Thierry ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(Supplement 1), 541-542

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See detailBrain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in normal healthy and hemodialyzed populations.
CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; CARLISI, Ignazia ULg; KOVACS, Stéphanie ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(Supplement 1), 512

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See detailEnglish translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the SarQuoL® questionnaire.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Edwards, M.; Dennison, E.M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(Supplement 1), 221-222

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See detailPhysical and muscle performances among elderly nursing home residents.
Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(Supplement 1), 217

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See detailPrevalence of frailty among nursing home, according to different operational definitions.
Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; GILLAIN, Sophie ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(Supplement 1), 216-217

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See detailTen years of Denosumab (DMAB) treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Results from the FREEDOM Extension trial.
Bone, H.G.; Brandi, M.L.; Brown, J.P. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(Supplement 1), 135-136

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See detailPrevalence of concomitant bone and muscle wasting in patients from the SarcoPhAge study.
Locquet, Médéa ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(supplement 1), 129

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See detailEfficacy and safety of hyaluronic acid in the management of osteoarthritis: Evidence from real-life setting trials and surveys.
Rannou, F.; Maheu; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(supplement 1), 66

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See detailEfficacy and safety of glucosamine sulfate in the management of osteoarthritis: Evidence from real-life setting trials and surveys.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(supplement 1), 65

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See detailThe future prevalence of sarcopenia in Europe
Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Tchoconte, C.; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(Supplement 1), 53-54

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See detailrelationship between total hip BMD T-score and incidence of nonvertebral fracture with up to 10 years of Denosumab (DMAB) treatment
Ferrari, S.; ADAMI, S.; Brown, J.P. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(Supplement 1), 49-50

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See detailA randomized double-blind study of Denosumab (DMAB) compared with Zoledronic acid (ZOL) in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis previously treated with oral bisphosphonates
Miller, P.; Pannacciulli, N.; Brown, J.P. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016, April), 27(SUPPLEMENT1), 42

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See detailDiacerein: Benefits, Risks and Place in the Management of Osteoarthritis. An Opinion-Based Report from the ESCEO
Pavelka, Karel; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Cooper, Cyrus et al

in Drugs & Aging (2016), 33(2), 75-85

Diacerein is a symptomatic slow-acting drug in osteoarthritis (SYSADOA) with anti-inflammatory, anti-catabolic and pro-anabolic properties on cartilage and synovial membrane. It has also recently been ... [more ▼]

Diacerein is a symptomatic slow-acting drug in osteoarthritis (SYSADOA) with anti-inflammatory, anti-catabolic and pro-anabolic properties on cartilage and synovial membrane. It has also recently been shown to have protective effects against subchondral bone remodelling. Following the end of the revision procedure by the Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee of the European Medicines Agency, the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) constituted a panel of 11 experts to better define the real place of diacerein in the armamentarium for treating OA. Based on a literature review of clinical trials and meta-analyses, the ESCEO confirms that the efficacy of diacerein is similar to that of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) after the first month of treatment, and superior to that of paracetamol. Additionally, diacerein has shown a prolonged effect on symptoms of several months once treatment was stopped. The use of diacerein is associated with common gastrointestinal disorders such as soft stools and diarrhoea, common mild skin reactions, and, uncommonly, hepatobiliary disorders. However, NSAIDs and paracetamol are known to cause potentially severe hepatic, gastrointestinal, renal, cutaneous and cardiovascular reactions. Therefore, the ESCEO concludes that the benefit–risk balance of diacerein remains positive in the symptomatic treatment of hip and knee osteoarthritis. Furthermore, similarly to other SYSADOAs, the ESCEO positions diacerein as a first-line pharmacological background treatment of osteoarthritis, particularly for patients in whom NSAIDs or paracetamol are contraindicated [less ▲]

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See detailCost-effectiveness of personalized supplementation with vitamin D-rich dairy products in the prevention of osteoporotic fractures
Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Hiligsmann, Mickaël; Burlet, Nansa et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016), 27

Summary: Titrated supplementations with vitamin D-fortified yogurt, based on spontaneous calcium and vitamin D intakes, can be cost-effective in postmenopausal women with or without increased risk of ... [more ▼]

Summary: Titrated supplementations with vitamin D-fortified yogurt, based on spontaneous calcium and vitamin D intakes, can be cost-effective in postmenopausal women with or without increased risk of osteoporotic fractures. Introduction: The objective of this study is to assess the costeffectiveness of the vitamin D-fortified yogurt given to women with and without an increased risk of osteoporotic fracture. Methods: Avalidated cost-effectiveness microsimulation Markov model of osteoporosis management was used. Three personalized supplementation scenarios to reflect the Ca/Vit D needs taking into account the well-known variations in dietary habits and a possible pharmacological supplementation in Ca/ Vit D, given above or in combination with anti-osteoporosis medications: one yogurt per day, i.e., 400 mg of Ca+200 IU of Vit D (scenario 1 U), two yogurts per day, i.e., 800 mg of Ca+ 400 IU of Vit D (scenario 2 U), or three yogurts per day, i.e., 1, 200 mg of Ca+600 IU of Vit D (scenario 3 U). Results: One yogurt is cost-effective in the general population above the age of 70 years and in all age groups in women with low bone mineral density (BMD) or prevalent vertebral fracture (PVF). The daily intake of two yogurts is cost-effective above 80 years in the general population and above 70 years in the two groups of women at increased risk of fractures. However, an intake of three yogurts per day is only cost-effective above 80 years old in the general population, as well as in women with low BMD or PVF. Conclusions: Our study is the first economic analysis supporting the cost-effectiveness of dairy products, fortified with vitamin D, in the armamentarium against osteoporotic fractures. [less ▲]

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See detailDeterminants of vitamin D supplementation prescription in nursing homes: a survey among general practitioners
Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Cavalier, Etienne ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2016), first online

Abstract Summary A total of 119 GPs participated to a survey aimed to assess the profile and determinants of vitamin D supplementation prescription in nursing homes. Among the respondent GPs, 65 (54.6 ... [more ▼]

Abstract Summary A total of 119 GPs participated to a survey aimed to assess the profile and determinants of vitamin D supplementation prescription in nursing homes. Among the respondent GPs, 65 (54.6 %) systematically prescribe vitamin D to their institutionalized patients and the 54 (45.4 %) others prescribe only sometimes. Introduction The aim of this study is to assess the profile and determinants of vitamin D supplementation prescription in nursing homes. Methods General practitioners (GPs) having at least one patient in a nursing home in Liège, Belgium, were asked to complete the survey. Results A total of 119 GPs participated in the survey. Among the respondent GPs, 65 (54.6 %) systematically prescribe vitamin D to their institutionalized patients and the 54 (45.4 %) others prescribe only sometimes. The main reasons for prescribing vitamin D cited by GPs who do so systematically are as follows: because they believe nursing home residents are mostly deficient in vitamin D status (92.1 %), because they believe that vitamin D supplementation prevents osteoporotic fractures (77.8 %), and because vitamin D supplementation is recommended by various scientific societies (38.1 %). GPs who only prescribe vitamin D supplementation in some patients mainly do so following a diagnosis of osteoporosis (82.4 %), on the basis the 25(OH)D level (78.4 %), in the case of history of fracture (54.9 %) or after a recent fracture (43.4 %). Surprisingly, 16 physicians (31.4 %) only prescribe vitamin D when they think of it. Interestingly, while 40.7% of GPs always prescribe the same dose of vitamin D, the remaining 59.3 % prescribe a dose that will mainly depend on the results of the 25(OH)D level (94.0 %), the patient’s bone health (49.3 %), or history of fracture (43.3 %). Conclusions More than half of GPs systematically prescribe vitamin D to their patients living in nursing homes. The other GPs usually prescribe vitamin D following the result of the vitamin D status or after a diagnosis of osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Dairy Products Consumption on Health: Benefits and Beliefs-A Commentary from the Belgian Bone Club and the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases.
Rozenberg, Serge; Body, Jean-Jacques; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2016), 98(1), 1-17

Dairy products provide a package of essential nutrients that is difficult to obtain in low-dairy or dairy-free diets, and for many people it is not possible to achieve recommended daily calcium intakes ... [more ▼]

Dairy products provide a package of essential nutrients that is difficult to obtain in low-dairy or dairy-free diets, and for many people it is not possible to achieve recommended daily calcium intakes with a dairy-free diet. Despite the established benefits for bone health, some people avoid dairy in their diet due to beliefs that dairy may be detrimental to health, especially in those with weight management issues, lactose intolerance, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or trying to avoid cardiovascular disease. This review provides information for health professionals to enable them to help their patients make informed decisions about consuming dairy products as part of a balanced diet. There may be a weak association between dairy consumption and a possible small weight reduction, with decreases in fat mass and waist circumference and increases in lean body mass. Lactose intolerant individuals may not need to completely eliminate dairy products from their diet, as both yogurt and hard cheese are well tolerated. Among people with arthritis, there is no evidence for a benefit to avoid dairy consumption. Dairy products do not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, particularly if low fat. Intake of up to three servings of dairy products per day appears to be safe and may confer a favourable benefit with regard to bone health. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease
SMOLEN, J.S.; COLLAUD BASSET, S.; BOERS, M. et al

in Annals of Rheumatic Diseases (2016)

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial ... [more ▼]

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft ‘Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA’ released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria. [less ▲]

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See detailRecommendations for the conduct of clinical trials for drugs to treat or prevent sarcopenia
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Cooper, Cyrus; Rizzoli, René et al

in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research (2016), 28(1), 47-58

Purpose: Sarcopenia is an age-related muscle condition which is frequently a precursor of frailty, mobility disability and premature death. It has a high prevalence in older populations and presents a ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Sarcopenia is an age-related muscle condition which is frequently a precursor of frailty, mobility disability and premature death. It has a high prevalence in older populations and presents a considerable social and economic burden. Potential treatments are under development but, as yet, no guidelines support regulatory studies for new drugs to manage sarcopenia. The objective of this position paper is therefore to suggest a set of potential endpoints and target population definitions to stimulate debate and progress within the medico-scientific and regulatory communities. Methods: A multidisciplinary expert working group was hosted by the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, which reviewed and discussed the recent literature from a perspective of clinical experience and guideline development. Relevant parallels were drawn from the development of definition of osteoporosis as a disease and clinical assessment of pharmaceutical treatments for that indication. Results A case-finding decision tree is briefly reviewed with a discussion of recent prevalence estimations of different relevant threshold values. The selection criteria for patients in regulatory studies are discussed according to the aims of the investigation (sarcopenia prevention or treatment) and the stage of project development. The possible endpoints of such studies are reviewed and a pleais made for the establishment of a core outcome set to be used in all clinical trials of sarcopenia. Conclusions : The current lack of guidelines for the assessment of new therapeutic treatments for sarcopenia could potentially hinder the delivery of effective medicines to patients at risk. [less ▲]

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