References of "Reginster, P"
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See detailSpontaneous tracheal rupture: a case report
Rousie, Céline ULg; Van Damme, Hendrik ULg; Radermecker, Maurice ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2004), 104(2), 204-208

We report the case of a spontaneous posterior tracheal wall rupture following a cough. A 67-year-old woman with a history of longstanding treatment with corticosteroids (8 years) for Giant Cell Arteritis ... [more ▼]

We report the case of a spontaneous posterior tracheal wall rupture following a cough. A 67-year-old woman with a history of longstanding treatment with corticosteroids (8 years) for Giant Cell Arteritis had general anesthesia for cataract removal. Surgery and anesthesia were uneventful. In the recovery room, the patient coughed and soon after developed subcutaneous emphysema of the neck. Chest radiography confirmed the clinical diagnosis of marked subcutaneous emphysema and showed huge pneumomediastinum and minor right pneumothorax. A thoracic CT scan revealed a large laceration of the posterior tracheal wall (a 4 cm longitudinal tear), extending from the middle of the trachea to the level of the carina. Surgical repair consisted in closure of the dilaceration using an autologous pericardial patch. It seems reasonable to suspect the facilitating role of connective tissue fragility due to chronic corticosteroid administration in the development of this tracheal rupture following cough. Tracheal rupture is a potentially lethal injury, which can be repaired successfully if the diagnosis is made early. Risk factors, diagnosis and principles of treatment of this lesion are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailDuplex ultrasound as first-line screening test for patients suspected of renal artery stenosis: prospective evaluation in high-risk group.
NCHIMI LONGANG, Alain ULg; Biquet, J. F.; Brisbois, D. et al

in European Radiology (2003), 13(6), 1413-9

Our objective was to assess how far the progress in ultrasound devices has increased feasibility and accuracy of Duplex ultrasound (DUS) for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis (RAS), in a population ... [more ▼]

Our objective was to assess how far the progress in ultrasound devices has increased feasibility and accuracy of Duplex ultrasound (DUS) for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis (RAS), in a population with high prevalence of atherosclerotic renovascular lesions. Ninety-one hypertensive patients with atherosclerotic disease were prospectively evaluated by both DUS and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) of the renal arteries. Only proximal criteria (peak systolic velocity >180 mm/s or renal-to-aortic ratio >3.5) were used for the diagnosis of significant RAS (>60% narrowing). For both techniques, two readers were involved for interobserver variability study. Two hundred one arteries were demonstrated by DSA on 182 available kidneys. The prevalence of RAS among the study group was 37%. Sixteen of the 19 accessory arteries were not seen at DUS; in 8 patients, one renal artery was not seen at DUS (feasibility 91%). On the 177 arteries assessed, in comparison with DSA, DUS yielded 96, 91, and 97% mean values of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively. Kappa for interobserver agreement was 0.95 for DUS and 0.92 for DSA. Although still unreliable for the detection of accessory arteries, DUS is in our experience an accurate and reproducible diagnostic test for RAS. [less ▲]

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