References of "Reggers, Jean"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe TaqI A DRD2 polymorphism in type II alcohol dependence: a marker of age at onset or of a familial disease?
Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Reggers, Jean ULg; Gorwood, Philip et al

in Alcohol (2009), 43(4), 271-5

Cloninger's type II is a severe, early-onset, male-limited, and genetically influenced, impulsive form of alcoholism. Significant association has been reported between the A1 allele of the D2 dopamine ... [more ▼]

Cloninger's type II is a severe, early-onset, male-limited, and genetically influenced, impulsive form of alcoholism. Significant association has been reported between the A1 allele of the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) gene, substance misuse and personality traits of impulsivity and novelty seeking. We assessed the association between the TaqI A DRD2 gene polymorphism with Cloninger's typology and family history of alcohol abuse, which is thought to be more frequent in type II alcoholics. Fifty-one male alcohol-dependent patients were discriminated between type I and type II according to age at onset of alcohol-related problems and interviewed about family history of alcoholism. The associations between DRD2 (A1 or A2 alleles), family history, and typology were assessed by Pearson's chi-square test. Although typology was not associated with the studied polymorphism, a higher rate of general family history of alcohol abuse was still observed in type II patients (chi(2)(1)=4.53; P=.033). Furthermore, the A1 allele of the DRD2 was significantly associated with paternal history of alcoholism (chi(2)(1)=4.66; P=.031) and male, first-degree, collateral history of alcoholism (chi(2)(1)=4.40; P=.036). Age at onset of alcohol-related problems as main discriminator between type I and type II alcohol dependence does not seem to be associated by the TaqI A DRD2 polymorphism. However, the A1 allele of the DRD2 may be a marker of male familial alcoholism, which has been associated with type II alcohol dependence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe short allele of the serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism influences relapse in alcohol dependence.
Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Reggers, Jean ULg; Gorwood, Philip et al

in Alcohol & Alcoholism (2008), 43

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVasopressin-neurophysin and DST in major depression : Relationship with suicidal behavior.
Pitchot, William ULg; Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Pinto, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Journal of Psychiatric Research (2008), 42

The purpose of the present study was to assess if AVP-neurophysin is associated with hypercortisolemia and suicidal behaviour in depressed patients. The study included 28 patients subgrouped into suicide ... [more ▼]

The purpose of the present study was to assess if AVP-neurophysin is associated with hypercortisolemia and suicidal behaviour in depressed patients. The study included 28 patients subgrouped into suicide attempters (n=13) and nonattempters (n=15). We assessed basal AVP-neurophysins concentrations and post-dexamethasone (DST) cortisol levels. Concentrations of AVP-neurophysins did not differ between DST suppressors and nonsuppressors: 0.29+/-0.13ng/ml vs 0.36+/-0.21ng/ml, (F=1.1, df=1, 27, p=0.30). Suicide attempters did not differ from nonattempters for AVP-neurophysins levels. Our results fail to support a role of AVP in the early cortisol escape. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (41 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPlasma oxytocin and anxiety in depressed patients
Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Fuchs, Sonia; Pitchot, William ULg et al

in European Neuropsychopharmacology (2005, October), 15(Suppl. 3), 430

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAVP- and OT-neurophysins response to apomorphine and clonidine in major depression
Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Fuchs, Sonia; Pitchot, William ULg et al

in Psychoneuroendocrinology (2005), 30(9), 839-845

A number of studies have reported abnormalities of neurohypophyseal secretions in major depressive disorder. The purpose of the present study was to test the influence of apomorphine and clonidine ... [more ▼]

A number of studies have reported abnormalities of neurohypophyseal secretions in major depressive disorder. The purpose of the present study was to test the influence of apomorphine and clonidine injections on plasma vasopressin (AVP)-neurophysins and oxytocin(OT)-neurophysins levels, as direct index of posterior pituitary activation in major depression. Apomorphine and clonidine tests were carried out in 25 medication-free depressive patients and 25 age and gender-matched healthy controls. Blood for neurophysins analysis was drawn by venipuncture at t0, t+20, t+40, t+60 and t+120. Baseline AVP-neurophysins concentrations were significantly tower in depressives (0.12 +/- 0.14 ng/ml) than in healthy subjects (0.24 +/- 2.15 ng/ml) (p < 0.04). The response to apomorphine test revealed a significant reduced response at 20 (p=0.01), 40 (p=0.007) and 60 (p=0.02) and 120 (p=0.02) min. Following clonidine test, post hoc tests also revealed a significant decrease at 0 (p=0.04), 20 (p=0.01), 40 (p=0.007) and 60 (p=0.02) and 120 (p=0.006) min. Concerning OT-neurophysins, no significant differences were found between depressed and controls in response to clonidine or apomorphine injections. Following clonidine and apomorphine, major depressives exhibited a significantly lower peak GH response than controls. The study supports partially the hypothesis of a reduced vasopressinergic activity in depression. Moreover, we did not find any influence of acute apomorphine or clonidine injections on vasopressin-neurophysin or oxytocin-neurophysin in depressive patients. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAlcohol craving and the A1 allele of the D2 dopamine receptor gene
Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Gorwood, P.; Reggers, Jean ULg et al

in European Psychiatry (2005, March), 20(Suppl. 1), 25

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAre spatial memories strengthened in the human hippocampus during slow wave sleep?
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg; Fuchs, Sonia et al

in Neuron (2004), 44(3), 535-545

In rats, the firing sequences observed in hippocampal ensembles during spatial learning are replayed during subsequent sleep, suggesting a role for posttraining sleep periods in the offline processing of ... [more ▼]

In rats, the firing sequences observed in hippocampal ensembles during spatial learning are replayed during subsequent sleep, suggesting a role for posttraining sleep periods in the offline processing of spatial memories. Here, using regional cerebral blood flow measurements, we show that, in humans, hippocampal areas that are activated during route learning in a virtual town are likewise activated during subsequent slow wave sleep. Most importantly, we found that the amount of hippocampal activity expressed during slow wave sleep positively correlates with the improvement of performance in route retrieval on the next day. These findings suggest that learning-dependent modulation in hippocampal activity during human sleep reflects the offline processing of recent episodic and spatial memory traces, which eventually leads to the plastic changes underlying the subsequent improvement in performance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (2 ULg)
See detailTherapeutic application of right prefrontal low repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on depressed patients
Fuchs, S.; Reggers, Jean ULg; Pinto, Emmanuel ULg et al

in European Neuropsychopharmacology (2004, October), 14(Suppl. 3), 226

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeurohypophyseal response to apomorphine and clonidine stimulation in major depression
Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg; Fuchs, Sonia; Pitchot, William ULg et al

in European Neuropsychopharmacology (2004, October), 14(Suppl. 3), 291-292

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRelationships between DRD2 and DAT polymorphisms and personality traits in healthy subjects
Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Reggers, Jean ULg; Adam, Martine ULg et al

in European Neuropsychopharmacology (2003, September), 13(Suppl. 4), 427-428

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailToxicomanes: sevrage ultrarapide aux opiacés sous anesthésie générale au CHU de Liège
Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Reggers, Jean ULg; Fuchs, S. et al

in Agenda Psychiatrie (L') (2003), 28

Detailed reference viewed: 323 (28 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMismatch negativity is not correlated with neuroendocrine indicators of catecholaminergic activity in healthy subjects.
Hansenne, Michel ULg; Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg et al

in Human Psychopharmacology (2003), 18(3), 201-5

The identification of the brain structures and neurotransmitters responsible for the generation and/or modulation of the mismatch negativity (MMN) may contribute to a clearer understanding of its ... [more ▼]

The identification of the brain structures and neurotransmitters responsible for the generation and/or modulation of the mismatch negativity (MMN) may contribute to a clearer understanding of its functional significance, and may have clinical implications. In this context, some findings suggest that the scalp-recorded MMN reflects activity from multiple neuronal ensembles within or in the immediate vicinity of the primary auditory cortex and with possible contribution from the frontal cortex. However, few data are available concerning the influence of neurotransmitter systems on the MMN. In this study, the relationship between both noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems and the MMN were investigated in 34 healthy volunteers. Noradrenergic and dopaminergic activities were assessed with the apomorphine and clonidine challenge tests. The results showed no significant relationship between either growth hormone (GH) responses to apomorphine or clonidine and the MMN amplitude or latency. Therefore, this study does not demonstrate the implication of dopaminergic and noradrenergic activities as assessed by GH response to apomorphine and clonidine for the generation and/or the modulation of the MMN. However, given the complexity of the central neurotransmitter systems, these results cannot be considered as definitive evidence against a relationship between dopaminergic and noradrenergic activity and the MMN. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHarm avoidance is related to mismatch negativity (MMN) amplitude in healthy subjects
Hansenne, Michel ULg; Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg et al

in Personality & Individual Differences (2003), 34(6), 1039-1048

Event-related potential (ERP) studies evidenced that some personality dimensions induced different controlled cognitive attitudes towards the processing of information. However, few data are available on ... [more ▼]

Event-related potential (ERP) studies evidenced that some personality dimensions induced different controlled cognitive attitudes towards the processing of information. However, few data are available on the possible relationships between personality and automatic attention or early sensory processing. In the present study the relationships between the mismatch negativity (MMN) and personality described by the Cloninger model of personality were investigated. Subjects were 32 healthy volunteers. The MMN was recorded with frequent stimuli tones of 1470 Hz, 70 dB and 40 ms duration, and target (20%) tones of 1470 Hz, 70 dB, 80 ms duration. The subjects completed a French version of the 226-item self-questionnaire TCI within the day following psychophysiological recording. The results showed that the HA dimension was negatively correlated with the MMN amplitude. The association was more present among women than men. No significant relationship existed between the other dimensions of personality and either the MMN amplitude or latency. These findings suggest that the MMN is related to the behavioral inhibition system (BIS), a fact which is consistent with clinical studies conducted on schizophrenia and anxiety disorders. In conclusion, this study suggests that personality dimensions induce different automatic attitudes towards the processing of information. (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLipides, dépression et suicide
Colin, A.; Reggers, Jean ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Encéphale (L') (2003), 29(1, JAN-FEB), 49-58

Polyunsatured fatty acids are made out of a hydrocarbonated chain of variable length with several double bonds. The position of the first double bond (omega; omega) differentiates polyunsatured omega3 ... [more ▼]

Polyunsatured fatty acids are made out of a hydrocarbonated chain of variable length with several double bonds. The position of the first double bond (omega; omega) differentiates polyunsatured omega3 fatty acids (for example : alpha-linolenic acid or alpha-LNA) and polyunsatured omega6 fatty acids (for example : linoleic acid or LA). These two classes of fatty acids are said to be essential because they cannot be synthetised by the organism and have to be taken from alimentation. The omega3 are present in linseed oil, nuts, soya beans, wheat and cold water fish whereas omega6 are present in maize, sunflower and sesame oil. Fatty acids are part of phospholipids and, consequently, of all biological membranes. The membrane fluidity, of crucial importance for its functionning, depends on its lipidic components. Phospholipids composed of chains of polyunsatured fatty acids increase the membrane fluidity because, by bending some chains, double bonds prevent them from compacting themselves perfectly. Membrane fluidity is also determined by the phospholipids/free cholesterol ratio, as cholesterol increases membrane viscosity. A diet based on a high proportion of essential polyunsatured fatty acids (fluid) would allow a higher incorporation of cholesterol (rigid) in the membranes to balance their fluidity, which would contribute to lower blood cholesterol levels. Brain membranes have a very high content in essential polyunsatured fatty acids for which they depend on alimentation. Any dietary lack of essential polyunsatured fatty acids has consequences on cerebral development, modifying the activity of enzymes of the cerebral membranes and decreasing efficiency in learning tasks. Epidemiological data - The prevalence of depression seems to increase continuously since the beginning of the century. Though different factors most probably contribute to this evolution, it has been suggested that it could be related to an evolution of alimentary patterns in the Western world, in which polyunsatured omega fatty acids contained in fish, game and vegetables have been largely replaced by polyunsatured omega6 fatty acids of cereal oils. Some epidemiological data support the hypothesis of a relation between lower depression and/or suicide rates and a higher consumption of fish. These data do not however prove a relation of causality. Cholesterol and depression - Several cohort studies (on nondepressed subjects) have assessed the relationship between plasma cholesterol and depressive symptoms with contradictory results. Though some results found a significant relationship between a decrease of total cholesterol and high scores of depression, some other did not. Studies among patients suffering from major depression signalled more constantly an association between low cholesterol and major depression. Besides, some trials showed that clinical recovery maybe associated with a significant increase of total cholesterol. Cholesterol and suicidal behaviour - The hypothesis that a low cholesterol level may represent a suicidal risk factor was discovered accidentally following a series of epidemiological studies which revealed an increase of the suicidal risk among subjects with a low cholesterol level. Though some contradictory studies do exist, this relationship has been confirmed by several subsequent cohort studies. These findings have challenged the vast public health programs aimed at promoting the decrease of cholesterol, and even suggested to suspend the administration of lipid lowering drugs. Recent clinical studies on populations treated whith lipid lowering drugs showed nevertheless a lack of significant increase of mortality, either by suicide or accident. In addition, several controlled studies among psychiatric patients revealed a decrease of the concentrations of plasma cholesterol among patients who had attempted suicide in comparison with other patients. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and depression - In major depression, all studies revealed a significant decrease of the polyunsaturated omega3 fatty acids and/or an increase of the omega6/omega3 ratio in plasma and/or in the membranes of the red cells. In addition, two studies found a higher severity of depression when the level of polyunsaturated omega fatty acids or the ratio omega3/omega6 was low. Parallel to these modifications, other biochemical perturbations have been reported in major depression, particularly an activation of the inflammatory response system, resulting in an increase of the pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukins: IL-1beta, IL-6 and interferon gamma) and eicosanoids (among others, prostaglandin E2) in the blood and the CSF of depressed patients. These substances cause a peroxidation and, consequently a catabolism of membrane phospholipids, among others those containing polyunsaturated fatty acids. The cytokines and eicosanoids derive from polyunsaturated fatty acids and have opposite physiological functions according to their omega or omega6 precursor. Arachidonic acid (omega6) is, among others, precursor of pro-inflammatoty prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), whereas polyunsaturated W fatty acids inhibit the formation of PGE2. It has been shown that a dietary increase of polyunsaturated W fatty acids reduced strongly the production of IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-6 and TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor-alpha). In contrast, diets with a higher supply of linoleic acid (omega6) increased significantly the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, like TNF-alpha. Therefore, polyunsaturated omega3 fatty acids could be associated at different levels in the pathophysiology of major depression, on the one hand through their role in the membrane fluidity which influences diverse steps of neurotransmission and, on the other hand, through their function as precursor of pro-inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids disturbing neurotransmission. In addition, antidepressants could exhibit an immunoregulating effect by reducing the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, by increasing the release of endogenous antagonists of pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-10 and, finally, by acting like inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase. Therapeutic use of fatty acids - Data available concerning the administration of supplements of DHA (docosahexanoic acid) or other polyunsaturated fatty acids omega3 are limited. In a double blind placebo-controlled study on 30 patients with bipolar disorder, the addition of polyunsaturated omega3 fatty acids was associated with a longer period of remission. Moreover, nearly all the other prognosis measures were better in the omega3 group. Very recently, a controlled trial showed the benefits of adding an omega3 fatty acid, eicosopentanoic acid, among depressed patients. After 4 weeks, six of the 10 patients receiving the fatty acid were considered as responders in comparison with only one of the ten patients receiving placebo. Conclusions Some epidemiological, experimental and clinical data favour the hypothesis that polyunsaturated fatty acids could play a role in the pathogenesis and/or the treatment of depression. More studies however are needed in order to better precise the actual implication of those biochemical factors among the various aspects of depressive illness. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFurther evidence on the relationship between dopamine and novelty seeking: a neuroendocrine study
Hansenne, Michel ULg; Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Pitchot, William ULg et al

in Personality & Individual Differences (2002), 33(6), 967-977

In the biosocial model of Cloninger, three major personality dimensions, novelty seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA), and reward dependence (RD) are dependent on central monoaminergic systems, respectively ... [more ▼]

In the biosocial model of Cloninger, three major personality dimensions, novelty seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA), and reward dependence (RD) are dependent on central monoaminergic systems, respectively dopaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic. This study investigated the relationships between these major personality dimensions and growth hormone (GH) responses to both apomorphine and clonidine challenge tests in healthy subjects. GH responses to apomorphine were significantly correlated with NS when peak relative values were considered (r=0.47, P=0.03). HA and RD did not show any relationships with the endocrine responses. In contrast, no significant relationship existed between GH responses to clonidine and any of the three temperament dimensions. These results gave another support of the hypothesized link between NS and dopaminergic central neurotransmission. In contrast, the results did not confirm the association between RD and noradrenergic central neurotransmission, probably because RD is poorly validated. This partial confirmation might suggest that the link between personality traits and neurotransmission systems is probably indirect. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail5-HT1A dysfunction in borderline personality disorder.
Hansenne, Michel ULg; Pitchot, William ULg; Pinto, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Psychological Medicine (2002), 32(5), 935-41

BACKGROUND: A number of challenge studies have reported abnormalities of serotonergic function in borderline personality disorder (BPD). There are, however, problems with the pharmacological probes used ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: A number of challenge studies have reported abnormalities of serotonergic function in borderline personality disorder (BPD). There are, however, problems with the pharmacological probes used in these studies since fenfluramine and m-CPP are not only serotonergic agents but also induce release of catecholamines, particularly dopamine. Therefore, we tested whether subjects with BPD showed a blunted prolactin (PRL) response to flesinoxan, a highly potent and selective 5-HT1A agonist. METHODS: Flesinoxan challenge test was carried out in 20 BPD in-patients and 20 healthy controls matched for gender but not for age. Since 16 BPD in-patients exhibited major depressive co-morbidity, a group of 20 depressed in-patients matched for gender but not for age was also included. RESULTS: BPD in-patients exhibited blunted PRL responses as compared to controls, whereas depressed in-patients did not differ from controls. Moreover, PRL responses were lower among BPD in-patients than among depressed in-patients. Among the BPD in-patients, PRL responses to flesinoxan were lower in patients with past history of suicide attempts (N = 8) than in those with a negative history. CONCLUSIONS: The results show major involvement of serotonergic function in BPD and are consistent with previous studies linking lower serotonergic activity with impulsivity. More particularly, our data suggest that BPD is characterized by lower 5-HT1A receptor sensitivity. Moreover, the data support the involvement of 5-HT1A activity in suicidal behaviour. However, this conclusion is limited because other hormonal responses such as ACTH and cortisol were not assessed, and because BPD was assessed by a self-report questionnaire and not a structured clinical interview. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDopamine 'D2-like' receptor agonists in combination with cocaine: absence of interactive effects on locomotor activity.
Tirelli, Ezio ULg; Reggers, Jean ULg; Terry, P.

in Behavioural Pharmacology (1997), 8(2-3), 147-59

This study examined interactions between cocaine and drugs that act as direct agonists at subtypes of "D2-like" dopamine receptors. The drugs 7-OH-DPAT, quinpirole and RU24213 were studied alone and in ... [more ▼]

This study examined interactions between cocaine and drugs that act as direct agonists at subtypes of "D2-like" dopamine receptors. The drugs 7-OH-DPAT, quinpirole and RU24213 were studied alone and in combination with cocaine for their effects on locomotor activity in non-habituated mice. Locomotor activity was measured by photobeam crossings over 140 min. At the doses given (7-OH-DPAT: 0.006-6.4 mg/kg; quinpirole: 0.001-1 mg/kg; RU24213: 0.008-8 mg/kg) all three direct agonists dose-dependently reduced locomotor activity throughout the test, whereas cocaine (0.6-20 mg/kg) produced dose-related hyperactivity. Next, for each direct agonist, a series of doses was selected (up to threshold behaviourally-active doses) as pretreatments to a sub-maximally stimulant dose of cocaine (15 mg/kg). 7-OH-DPAT and quinpirole did not modulate the effects of cocaine; RU24213 produced, at best, a very modest attenuation of the effects of cocaine. Finally, a series of cocaine doses (below stimulant threshold) was given before a single dose of each direct agonist (the lowest dose to reduce activity significantly). Cocaine did not reliably alter the hypoactivity produced by any of the D2-like agonists. By demonstrating negligible interactions between cocaine and D2-like agonists, the results fail to demonstrate any necessary involvement of D2-like receptors in one of the behavioural effects of cocaine. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (7 ULg)