References of "Redfield, Christina"
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See detailThe dynamics of lysozyme from bacteriophage lambda in solution probed by NMR and MD simulations.
Smith, Lorna J.; Bowen, Alice M.; Di Paolo, Alexandre et al

in Chembiochem : a European journal of chemical biology (2013), 14(14), 1780-8

(15) N NMR relaxation studies, analyses of NMR data to include chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings (RDC), NOEs and H(N) -H(alpha) coupling constants, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have ... [more ▼]

(15) N NMR relaxation studies, analyses of NMR data to include chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings (RDC), NOEs and H(N) -H(alpha) coupling constants, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to characterise the behaviour of lysozyme from bacteriophage lambda (lambda lysozyme) in solution. The lower and upper lip regions in lambda lysozyme (residues 51-60 and 128-141, respectively) show reduced (1) H-(15) N order parameters indicating mobility on a picosecond timescale. In addition, residues in the lower and upper lips also show exchange contributions to T2 indicative of slower timescale motions. The chemical shift, RDC, coupling constant and NOE data for lambda lysozyme indicate that two fluctuating beta-strands (beta3 and beta4) are populated in the lower lip region while the N terminus of helix alpha6 (residues 136-139) forms dynamic helical turns in the upper lip region. This behaviour is confirmed by MD simulations that show hydrogen bonds, indicative of the beta-sheet and helical secondary structure in the lip regions, with populations of 40-60 %. Thus in solution lambda lysozyme adopts a conformational ensemble that will contain both the open and closed forms observed in the crystal structures of the protein. [less ▲]

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See detailBackbone 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for lysozyme from bacteriophage lambda.
Di Paolo, Alexandre ULg; Duval, Valerie; Matagne, André ULg et al

in Biomolecular NMR assignments (2010), 4(1), 111-4

Lysozyme from lambda bacteriophage (lambda lysozyme) is an 18 kDa globular protein displaying some of the structural features common to all lysozymes; in particular, lambda lysozyme consists of two ... [more ▼]

Lysozyme from lambda bacteriophage (lambda lysozyme) is an 18 kDa globular protein displaying some of the structural features common to all lysozymes; in particular, lambda lysozyme consists of two structural domains connected by a helix, and has its catalytic residues located at the interface between these two domains. An interesting feature of lambda lysozyme, when compared to the well-characterised hen egg-white lysozyme, is its lack of disulfide bridges; this makes lambda lysozyme an interesting system for studies of protein folding. A comparison of the folding properties of lambda lysozyme and hen lysozyme will provide important insights into the role that disulfide bonds play in the refolding pathway of the latter protein. Here we report the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone resonance assignments for lambda lysozyme by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. These assignments provide the starting point for detailed investigation of the refolding pathway using pulse-labelling hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments monitored by NMR. [less ▲]

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See detailEngineering a camelid antibody fragment that binds to the active site of human lysozyme and inhibits its conversion into amyloid fibrils
Chan, Pak Ho; Pardon, Els; Menzer, Linda ULg et al

in Biochemistry (2008), 47

single-domain fragment, cAb-HuL22, of a camelid heavy-chain antibody specific for the active site of human lysozyme has been generated, and its effects on the properties of the I56T and D67H amyloidogenic ... [more ▼]

single-domain fragment, cAb-HuL22, of a camelid heavy-chain antibody specific for the active site of human lysozyme has been generated, and its effects on the properties of the I56T and D67H amyloidogenic variants of human lysozyme, which are associated with a form of systemic amyloidosis, have been investigated by a wide range of biophysical techniques. Pulse-labeling hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments monitored by mass spectrometry reveal that binding of the antibody fragment strongly inhibits the locally cooperative unfolding of the I56T and D67H variants and restores their global cooperativity to that characteristic of the wild-type protein. The antibody fragment was, however, not stable enough under the conditions used to explore its ability to perturb the aggregation behavior of the lysozyme amyloidogenic variants. We therefore engineered a more stable version of cAb-HuL22 by adding a disulfide bridge between the two beta-sheets in the hydrophobic core of the protein. The binding of this engineered antibody fragment to the amyloidogenic variants of lysozyme inhibited their aggregation into fibrils. These findings support the premise that the reduction in global cooperativity caused by the pathogenic mutations in the lysozyme gene is the determining feature underlying their amyloidogenicity. These observations indicate further that molecular targeting of enzyme active sites, and of protein binding sites in general, is an effective strategy for inhibiting or preventing the aberrant self-assembly process that is often a consequence of protein mutation and the origin of pathogenicity. Moreover, this work further demonstrates the unique properties of camelid single-domain antibody fragments as structural probes for studying the mechanism of aggregation and as potential inhibitors of fibril formation. [less ▲]

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See detailReduced global copperativity is a common feature underlying the amyloidogenicity of pathogenic lysozyme mutations
Dumoulin, Mireille ULg; Canet, Denis; Last, Alexander M. et al

in Journal of Molecular Biology (2005), 346(3), 773-788

One of the 20 or so human amyloid diseases is associated with the deposition in vital organs of full-length mutational variants of the antibacterial protein lysozyme. Here, we report experimental data ... [more ▼]

One of the 20 or so human amyloid diseases is associated with the deposition in vital organs of full-length mutational variants of the antibacterial protein lysozyme. Here, we report experimental data that permit a detailed comparison to be made of the behaviour of two of these amyloidogenic variants, I56T and D67H, under identical conditions. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments monitored by NMR and mass spectrometry reveal that, despite their different locations and the different effects of the two mutations on the structure of the native state of lysozyme, both mutations cause a cooperative destabilisation of a remarkably similar segment of the structure, comprising in both cases the beta-domain and the adjacent C-helix. As a result, both variant proteins populate transiently a closely similar, partially unstructured intermediate in which the beta-domain and the adjacent C-helix are substantially and simultaneously unfolded, whereas the three remaining a-helices that form the core of the a-domain still have their native-like structure. We show, in addition, that the binding of a camel antibody fragment, cAb-HuL6, which was raised against wild-type lysozyme, restores to both variant proteins the stability and cooperativity characteristic of the wild-type protein; as a consequence, it inhibits the formation of amyloid fibrils by both variants. These results indicate that the reduction in global cooperativity, an associated ability to populate transiently a specific, partly unfolded intermediate state under physiologically relevant conditions, is a common feature underlying the behaviour of these two pathogenic mutations. The formation of intermolecular interactions between lysozyme molecules that are in this partially unfolded state is therefore likely to be the fundamental trigger of the aggregation process that ultimately leads to the formation and deposition in tissue of amyloid fibrils. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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