References of "Rahmouni, Souad"
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See detailThe RIAD peptidomimetic inhibits HIV-1 replication in humanized NSG mice
Singh, Maneesh; Singh, Pratibha; Vaira, Dolores et al

in European Journal of Clinical Investigation (in press)

Background Increased intracellular concentration of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in T cells is associated with various immunodeficiency conditions including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Several ... [more ▼]

Background Increased intracellular concentration of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in T cells is associated with various immunodeficiency conditions including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Several reports indicate a critical role of activated protein kinase A (PKA) in the susceptibility of cells to HIV infection. We have used a cell permeable, stable peptidomimetic version (P3) of the RI-anchoring disruptor (RIAD), which prevents PKA interaction with A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs). It is known that RIAD peptide abrogates effects of localized cAMP signalling through anchored type I PKA in lymphocytes and prevents murine AIDS (MAIDS) infection when expressed as a transgene in mice. Methods and Results In vitro HIV-infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) show reduced levels of p24 and intracellular cAMP in T cells when treated with RIAD peptidomimetic (RIAD-P3). Humanized NOD/SCID/IL2cnull (NSG) mice infected with HIV-1 JRCSF and treated with RIAD-P3 (3􏰀5 mg) once every 2 weeks showed significantly reduced levels of viral load at +28, +42 and +56 days and increased CD4 numbers at +56 days after the start of treatment. RIAD-P3-treated humanized mice had lower levels of intracellular cAMP in T cells sorted from splenocytes. Conclusions Treatment with RIAD-P3 limits HIV-1 viral replication and stabilizes CD4 levels by mechanisms involving cAMP/PKA-I pathway in human PBMCs and humanized NSG mice. [less ▲]

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See detailDUSP3/VHR is a pro-angiogenic atypical dual-specificity phosphatase
Amand, Mathieu ULg; Erpicum, Charlotte ULg; BAJOU, Khalid ULg et al

in Molecular Cancer (2014)

Background DUSP3 phosphatase, also known as Vaccinia-H1 Related (VHR) phosphatase, encoded by DUSP3/Dusp3 gene, is a relatively small member of the dual-specificity protein phosphatases. In vitro studies ... [more ▼]

Background DUSP3 phosphatase, also known as Vaccinia-H1 Related (VHR) phosphatase, encoded by DUSP3/Dusp3 gene, is a relatively small member of the dual-specificity protein phosphatases. In vitro studies showed that DUSP3 is a negative regulator of ERK and JNK pathways in several cell lines. On the other hand, DUSP3 is implicated in human cancer. It has been alternatively described as having tumor suppressive and oncogenic properties. Thus, the available data suggest that DUSP3 plays complex and contradictory roles in tumorigenesis that could be cell type-dependent. Since most of these studies were performed using recombinant proteins or in cell-transfection based assays, the physiological function of DUSP3 has remained elusive. Results Using immunohistochemistry on human cervical sections, we observed a strong expression of DUSP3 in endothelial cells (EC) suggesting a contribution for this phosphatase to EC functions. DUSP3 downregulation, using RNA interference, in human EC reduced significantly in vitro tube formation on Matrigel and spheroid angiogenic sprouting. However, this defect was not associated with an altered phosphorylation of the documented in vitro DUSP3 substrates, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and EGFR but was associated with an increased PKC phosphorylation. To investigate the physiological function of DUSP3, we generated Dusp3-deficient mice by homologous recombination. The obtained DUSP3-/- mice were healthy, fertile, with no spontaneous phenotype and no vascular defect. However, DUSP3 deficiency prevented neo-vascularization of transplanted b-FGF containing Matrigel and LLC xenograft tumors as evidenced by hemoglobin (Hb) and FITC-dextran quantifications. Furthermore, we found that DUSP3 is required for b-FGF-induced microvessel outgrowth in the aortic ring assay. Conclusions All together, our data identify DUSP3 as a new important player in angiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells on experimental xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease
Bruck, France; Belle, Ludovic ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg et al

in Cytotherapy (2013), 15(3), 267-279

Background aims. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation caused by donor T cells reacting against host tissues. Previous ... [more ▼]

Background aims. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation caused by donor T cells reacting against host tissues. Previous studies have suggested that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) could exert potent immunosuppressive effects. Methods. The ability of human bone marrow derived MSCs to prevent xenogeneic GVHD in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice and in NOD/SCID/interleukin-2Rg(null) (NSG) mice transplanted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was assessed. Results. Injection of 200 106 human PBMCs intraperitoneally (IP) into sub-lethally (3.0 Gy) irradiated NOD/SCID mice also given anti-asialo GM1 antibodies IP 1 day prior and 8 days after transplantation induced lethal xenogeneic GVHD in all tested mice. Co-injection of 2 106 MSCs IP on day 0 did not prevent lethal xenogeneic GVHD induced by injection of human PBMCs. Similarly, injection of 30 106 human PBMCs IP into sub-lethally (2.5 Gy) irradiated NSG mice induced a lethal xenogeneic GVHD in all tested mice. Injection of 3 106 MSCs IP on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 did not prevent lethal xenogeneic GVHD induced by injection of human PBMCs. Conclusions. Injection of MSCs did not prevent xenogeneic GVHD in these two humanized mice models. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluating Effects of Tyrosine Phosphatase Inhibitors on T Cell Receptor Signaling
Rahmouni, Souad ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Liu, Wallace et al

in Phosphatase Modulators, Methods in Molecular Biology (2013)

The importance of tyrosine phosphorylation in normal cell physiology is well established, highlighted by the many human diseases that stem from abnormalities in protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) and protein ... [more ▼]

The importance of tyrosine phosphorylation in normal cell physiology is well established, highlighted by the many human diseases that stem from abnormalities in protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) function. Contrary to earlier assumptions, it is now clear that both PTKs and PTPs are highly specific, non-redundant, and tightly regulated enzymes. Hematopoietic cells express particularly high numbers of PTKs and PTPs, and aberrant function of these proteins have been linked to many hematopoietic disorders. While PTK inhibitors are among FDA approved drugs for the treatment of leukemia and other cancers, efforts to develop therapeutics that target specific PTPs are still in its infancy. Here, we describe methods on how to evaluate effects of PTP inhibitors on T cell receptor signaling. Moreover, we provide a comprehensive strategy for compound prioritization, applicable to any drug discovery project involving T cells. We present a testing funnel that starts with relatively high-throughput luciferase reporter assays, followed by immunoblot, calcium flux, flow cytometry, and proliferation assays, continues with cytokine bead arrays, and finishes with specificity assays that involve RNA interference. We provide protocols for experiments in the Jurkat T cell line, but more importantly give detailed instructions, paired with numerous tips, on how to prepare and work with primary human T cells. [less ▲]

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See detailAn improved protocol for efficient engraftment in NOD/LTSZ-SCIDIL-2Rgammanull mice allows HIV replication and development of anti-HIV immune responses.
Singh, Maneesh; Singh, Pratibha; Gaudray, Gilles et al

in PloS one (2012), 7(6), 38491

Cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (CB-HPCs) transplanted immunodeficient NOD/LtsZ-scidIL2Rgamma(null) (NSG) and NOD/SCID/IL2Rgamma(null) (NOG) mice need efficient human cell engraftment for long ... [more ▼]

Cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (CB-HPCs) transplanted immunodeficient NOD/LtsZ-scidIL2Rgamma(null) (NSG) and NOD/SCID/IL2Rgamma(null) (NOG) mice need efficient human cell engraftment for long-term HIV-1 replication studies. Total body irradiation (TBI) is a classical myeloablation regimen used to improve engraftment levels of human cells in these humanized mice. Some recent reports suggest the use of busulfan as a myeloablation regimen to transplant HPCs in neonatal and adult NSG mice. In the present study, we further ameliorated the busulfan myeloablation regimen with fresh CB-CD34+cell transplantation in 3-4 week old NSG mice. In this CB-CD34+transplanted NSG mice engraftment efficiency of human CD45+cell is over 90% in peripheral blood. Optimal engraftment promoted early and increased CD3+T cell levels, with better lymphoid tissue development and prolonged human cell chimerism over 300 days. These humanized NSG mice have shown long-lasting viremia after HIV-1JRCSF and HIV-1Bal inoculation through intravenous and rectal routes. We also saw a gradual decline of the CD4+T cell count, widespread immune activation, up-regulation of inflammation marker and microbial translocation after HIV-1 infection. Humanized NSG mice reconstituted according to our new protocol produced, moderate cellular and humoral immune responses to HIV-1 postinfection. We believe that NSG mice reconstituted according to our easy to use protocol will provide a better in vivo model for HIV-1 replication and anti-HIV-1 therapy trials. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Improved Protocol for Efficient Engraftment in NOD/ LTSZ-SCIDIL-2RcNULL Mice Allows HIV Replication and Development of Anti-HIV Immune Responses
Singh, Maneesh; Singh; Gaudray et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(6), 38491

Cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (CB-HPCs) transplanted immunodeficient NOD/LtsZ-scidIL2Rcnull (NSG) and NOD/SCID/IL2Rcnull (NOG) mice need efficient human cell engraftment for long-term HIV-1 ... [more ▼]

Cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (CB-HPCs) transplanted immunodeficient NOD/LtsZ-scidIL2Rcnull (NSG) and NOD/SCID/IL2Rcnull (NOG) mice need efficient human cell engraftment for long-term HIV-1 replication studies. Total body irradiation (TBI) is a classical myeloablation regimen used to improve engraftment levels of human cells in these humanized mice. Some recent reports suggest the use of busulfan as a myeloablation regimen to transplant HPCs in neonatal and adult NSG mice. In the present study, we further ameliorated the busulfan myeloablation regimen with fresh CB-CD34+cell transplantation in 3–4 week old NSG mice. In this CB-CD34+transplanted NSG mice engraftment efficiency of human CD45+cell is over 90% in peripheral blood. Optimal engraftment promoted early and increased CD3+T cell levels, with better lymphoid tissue development and prolonged human cell chimerism over 300 days. These humanized NSG mice have shown long-lasting viremia after HIV-1JRCSF and HIV-1Bal inoculation through intravenous and rectal routes. We also saw a gradual decline of the CD4+T cell count, widespread immune activation, up-regulation of inflammation marker and microbial translocation after HIV-1 infection. Humanized NSG mice reconstituted according to our new protocol produced, moderate cellular and humoral immune responses to HIV-1 postinfection. We believe that NSG mice reconstituted according to our easy to use protocol will provide a better in vivo model for HIV-1 replication and anti-HIV-1 therapy trials. [less ▲]

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See detailBone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells failed to prevent experimental xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease
Bruck, France; de Leval, Laurence; Belle, Ludovic ULg et al

Poster (2012)

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See detailLYP inhibits T-cell activation when dissociated from CSK
Vang; Liu, Wallace H; Delacroix, Laurence ULg et al

in Nature Chemical Biology (2012)

Lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (LYP) and C-terminal Src kinase (CSK) are negative regulators of signaling mediated through the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) and are thought to act in a cooperative manner ... [more ▼]

Lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (LYP) and C-terminal Src kinase (CSK) are negative regulators of signaling mediated through the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) and are thought to act in a cooperative manner when forming a complex. Here we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of the LYP–CSK complex in T cells. We demonstrate that dissociation of this complex is necessary for recruitment of LYP to the plasma membrane, where it downmodulates TCR signaling. Development of a potent and selective chemical probe of LYP confirmed that LYP inhibits T-cell activation when removed from CSK. Our findings may explain the reduced TCR-mediated signaling associated with a single-nucleotide polymorphism that confers increased risk for certain autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, and results in expression of a mutant LYP that is unable to bind CSK. Our compound also represents a starting point for the development of a LYP-based treatment of autoimmunity. [less ▲]

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See detailMice with Disrupted Type I Protein Kinase A Anchoring in T Cells Resist Retrovirus-Induced Immunodeficiency
Mosenden, Randi; Singh, Pratibha; Cornez, Isabelle et al

in Journal of Immunology (2011), 186(9), 5119-30

Type I protein kinase A (PKA) is targeted to the TCR-proximal signaling machinery by the A-kinase anchoring protein ezrin and negatively regulates T cell immune function through activation of the C ... [more ▼]

Type I protein kinase A (PKA) is targeted to the TCR-proximal signaling machinery by the A-kinase anchoring protein ezrin and negatively regulates T cell immune function through activation of the C-terminal Src kinase. RI anchoring disruptor (RIAD) is a high-affinity competitor peptide that specifically displaces type I PKA from A-kinase anchoring proteins. In this study, we disrupted type I PKA anchoring in peripheral T cells by expressing a soluble ezrin fragment with RIAD inserted in place of the endogenous A-kinase binding domain under the lck distal promoter in mice. Peripheral T cells from mice expressing the RIAD fusion protein (RIAD-transgenic mice) displayed augmented basal and TCR-activated signaling, enhanced T cell responsiveness assessed as IL-2 secretion, and reduced sensitivity to PGE2- and cAMP-mediated inhibition of T cell function. Hyperactivation of the cAMP–type I PKA pathway is involved in the T cell dysfunction of HIV infection, as well as murine AIDS, a disease model induced by infection of C57BL/6 mice with LP-BM5, a mixture of attenuated murine leukemia viruses. LP-BM5–infected RIADtransgenic mice resist progression of murine AIDS and have improved viral control. This underscores the cAMP–type I PKA pathway in T cells as a putative target for therapeutic intervention in immunodeficiency diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailSHIP-1 inhibits CD95/APO-1/Fas-induced apoptosis in primary T lymphocytes and T leukemic cells by promoting CD95 glycosylation independently of its phosphatase activity
Charlier, Edith ULg; Condé, Claude ULg; Zhang, Jing et al

in Leukemia : Official Journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K (2010)

SHIP-1 functions as a negative regulator of immune responses by hydrolyzing phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate generated by PI 3-kinase activity. As a result, SHIP-1 deficiency in mice results in ... [more ▼]

SHIP-1 functions as a negative regulator of immune responses by hydrolyzing phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate generated by PI 3-kinase activity. As a result, SHIP-1 deficiency in mice results in myeloproliferation and B cell lymphoma. On the other hand, SHIP-1 deficient mice have a reduced T cell population, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In this work, we hypothesized that SHIP-1 plays anti-apoptotic functions in T cells upon stimulation of the death receptor CD95/APO-1/Fas. Using primary T cells from SHIP-1-/- mice and T leukemic cell lines, we report here that SHIP-1 is a potent inhibitor of CD95-induced death. We observed that a small fraction of the SHIP-1 pool is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum where it promotes CD95 glycosylation. This post-translational modification requires an intact SH2 domain of SHIP-1, but is independent of its phosphatase activity. The glycosylated CD95 fails to oligomerize upon stimulation, resulting in impaired DISC formation and downstream apoptotic cascade. These results uncover an unanticipated inhibitory function for SHIP-1 and emphasize the role of glycosylation in the regulation of CD95 signaling in T cells. This work may also provide a new basis for therapeutic strategies using compounds inducing apoptosis through the CD95 pathway on SHIP-1 negative leukemic T cells. [less ▲]

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See detailThymic self-antigens for the design of a negative/tolerogenic self-vaccination against type 1 diabetes.
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Mottet, Marie ULg; Dardenne, Olivier ULg et al

in Current Opinion in Pharmacology (2010), 10

Before being able to react against infectious non-self antigens, the immune system has to be educated in the recognition and tolerance of neuroendocrine proteins and this critical process takes place only ... [more ▼]

Before being able to react against infectious non-self antigens, the immune system has to be educated in the recognition and tolerance of neuroendocrine proteins and this critical process takes place only in the thymus. The development of the autoimmune diabetogenic response results from a thymus dysfunction in programming central self-tolerance to pancreatic insulin-secreting islet β cells, leading to the breakdown of immune homeostasis with an enrichment of islet β-cell reactive effector T cells and a deficiency of β-cell specific natural regulatory T cells (nTregs) in the peripheral T-lymphocyte repertoire. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) is the dominant member of the insulin family expressed during fetal life by the thymic epithelium under the control of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene/protein. The very low degree of insulin gene transcription in normal murine and human thymus explains why the insulin protein is poorly tolerogenic as evidenced in many studies, including the failure of all clinical trials that have attempted immune tolerance to islet β cells via various methods of insulin administration. Based on the close homology and cross-tolerance between insulin, the primary T1D autoantigen, and IGF-2, the dominant self-antigen of the insulin family, a novel type of vaccination, so-called “negative/tolerogenic self-vaccination”, is currently being developed for prevention and cure of T1D. If this approach were found to be effective for reprogramming immunological tolerance in T1D, it could pave the way for the design of other self-vaccines against autoimmune endocrine diseases, as well as other organ-specific autoimmune diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailMultidentate small-molecule inhibitors of vaccinia H1-related (VHR) phosphatase decrease proliferation of cervix cancer cells.
Wu, Shuangding; Vossius, Sofie ULg; Rahmouni, Souad ULg et al

in Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2009), 52(21), 6716-23

Loss of VHR phosphatase causes cell cycle arrest in HeLa carcinoma cells, suggesting that VHR inhibition may be a useful approach to halt the growth of cancer cells. We recently reported that VHR is ... [more ▼]

Loss of VHR phosphatase causes cell cycle arrest in HeLa carcinoma cells, suggesting that VHR inhibition may be a useful approach to halt the growth of cancer cells. We recently reported that VHR is upregulated in several cervix cancer cell lines as well as in carcinomas of the uterine cervix. Here we report the development of multidentate small-molecule inhibitors of VHR that inhibit its enzymatic activity at nanomolar concentrations and exhibit antiproliferative effects on cervix cancer cells. Chemical library screening was used to identify hit compounds, which were further prioritized in profiling and kinetic experiments. SAR analysis was applied in the search for analogs with improved potency and selectivity, resulting in the discovery of novel inhibitors that are able to interact with both the phosphate-binding pocket and several distinct hydrophobic regions within VHR’s active site. This multidentate binding mode was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The inhibitors decreased the proliferation of cervix cancer cells, while growth of primary normal keratinocytes was not affected. These compounds may be a starting point to develop drugs for the treatment of cervical cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailElongator controls the migration and differentiation of cortical neurons through acetylation of a tubulin
Creppe, Catherine ULg; Malinouskaya, Lina ULg; Volvert, Marie-Laure ULg et al

in Cell (2009), 136

The generation of cortical projection neurons relies on the coordination of radial migration with branching. Here we report that the multi-subunit histone acetyltransferase Elongator complex, which ... [more ▼]

The generation of cortical projection neurons relies on the coordination of radial migration with branching. Here we report that the multi-subunit histone acetyltransferase Elongator complex, which contributes to transcript elongation, also regulates the maturation of projection neurons. Indeed, silencing of its scaffold (Elp1) or catalytic subunit (Elp3) cell-autonomously delays the migration and impairs the branching of projection neurons. Strikingly, neurons defective in Elongator show reduced levels of acetylated alpha tubulin. A direct reduction of alpha tubulin acetylation leads to comparable defects in cortical neurons and suggests that alpha tubulin is a target of Elp3. This is further supported by the demonstration that Elp3 promotes acetylation and counteracts HDAC6-mediated deacetylation of this substrate in vitro. Our results uncover alpha tubulin as a target of the Elongator complex and suggest that a tight regulation of its acetylation underlies the maturation of cortical projection neurons. [less ▲]

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See detailSmall-Molecule Inhibitors of Vaccinia-H1-Related Phosphatase VHR.
Tautz, lutz; Mustelin, Tomas; Wu, Shuangding et al

Report (2009)

Vaccinia H1-related (VHR) protein tyrosine phosphatase dephosphorylates and thereby inactivates extracellular signal-regulated kinases Erk1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases Jnk1/2. These mitogen-activated ... [more ▼]

Vaccinia H1-related (VHR) protein tyrosine phosphatase dephosphorylates and thereby inactivates extracellular signal-regulated kinases Erk1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases Jnk1/2. These mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases mediate major signaling pathways triggered by extracellular growth factor, stress, or cytokines and regulate cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. Unlike many MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs), VHR expression is not induced in response to activation of MAP kinases, but is instead regulated during cell cycle progression. The loss of VHR causes cell cycle arrest in HeLa carcinoma cells, suggesting that VHR inhibition may be a useful approach to halt the growth of cancer cells without detrimental effects on normal cells. Here we report the development of multidentate small-molecule inhibitors of VHR that inhibit its enzymatic activity at nanomolar concentrations and are selective for VHR over HePTP and MKP-1. This novel small molecular probe, ML113 (CID-6161281) appears to interact with both the phosphate-binding pocket and several distinct hydrophobic regions within VHR's active site. As a result, it will serve as a useful tool in probing these interactions and elucidating the molecular mechanism underlying the selectivity against this phosphatase, in addition to providing greater understanding of the functional consequences for cancer biology. [less ▲]

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See detailKCTD5, a putative substrate adaptor for cullin3 ubiquitin ligases
Bayón, Yolanda; Trinidad, Antonio G.; de la Puerta, María L et al

in FEBS Journal (2008), 275(15), 3900-3910

Potassium channel tetramerization domain (KCTD) proteins contain a bric-a-brac, tramtrak and broad complex (BTB) domain that is most similar to the tetramerization domain (T1) of voltage-gated potassium ... [more ▼]

Potassium channel tetramerization domain (KCTD) proteins contain a bric-a-brac, tramtrak and broad complex (BTB) domain that is most similar to the tetramerization domain (T1) of voltage-gated potassium channels. Some BTB-domain-containing proteins have been shown recently to participate as substrate-specific adaptors in multimeric cullin E3 ligase reactions by recruiting proteins for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. Twenty-two KCTD proteins have been found in the human genome, but their functions are largely unknown. In this study, we have characterized KCTD5, a new KCTD protein found in the cytosol of cultured cell lines. The expression of KCTD5 was upregulated post-transcriptionally in peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated through the T-cell receptor. KCTD5 interacted specifically with cullin3, bound ubiquitinated proteins, and formed oligomers through its BTB domain. Analysis of the interaction with cullin3 showed that, in addition to the BTB domain, some amino acids in the N-terminus of KCTD5 are required for binding to cullin3. These findings suggest that KCTD5 is a substrate-specific adaptor for cullin3-based E3 ligases. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo administration of a PKA type I inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cAMPS) restores T-cell responses in retrovirus-infected mice
Nayjib, Btissam ULg; Zeddou, Mustapha ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg et al

in Open Immunol journal (2008), 1

Murine AIDS (MAIDS) is caused by infection with the murine leukemia retrovirus RadLV-Rs and is characterized by T-cell anergy and severe immunodeficiency with increased susceptibilty to several ... [more ▼]

Murine AIDS (MAIDS) is caused by infection with the murine leukemia retrovirus RadLV-Rs and is characterized by T-cell anergy and severe immunodeficiency with increased susceptibilty to several experimental opportunistic infections as observed in HIV infection. T cell anergy is associated with an increase of intracellular cAMP level, triggering a multistep pathway involving activation of PKA type I and resulting in inhibition of proximal TCR signaling. We have reviously demonstrated that blocking PKA type I using the selective inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS, restores T-cell function in vitro in MAIDS as well as in HIV infection. In the present report, we investigated the effect of parenteral administration of Rp-8-Br-cAMPS in mice with MAIDS. We show that the compound is not toxic and partially restores the ex vivo proliferative responses to anti-CD3 mAb, but that it has no effect on the lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly characterizing the MAIDS syndrome. [less ▲]

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See detailCervix carcinoma is associated with an up-regulation and nuclear localization of the dual-specificity protein phosphatase VHR.
Henkens, Rachel ULg; Delvenne, Philippe ULg; Arafa, Mohammad et al

in BMC Cancer (2008), 8

BACKGROUND: The 21-kDa Vaccinia virus VH1-related (VHR) dual-specific protein phosphatase (encoded by the DUSP3 gene) plays a critical role in cell cycle progression and is itself regulated during the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The 21-kDa Vaccinia virus VH1-related (VHR) dual-specific protein phosphatase (encoded by the DUSP3 gene) plays a critical role in cell cycle progression and is itself regulated during the cell cycle. We have previously demonstrated using RNA interference that cells lacking VHR arrest in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle and show signs of beginning of cell senescence. METHODS: In this report, we evaluated successfully the expression levels of VHR protein in 62 hysterectomy or conization specimens showing the various (pre) neoplastic cervical epithelial lesions and 35 additional cases of hysterectomy performed for non-cervical pathologies, from patients under 50 years of age. We used a tissue microarray and IHC technique to evaluate the expression of the VHR phosphatase. Immunofluorescence staining under confocal microscopy, Western blotting and RT-PCR methods were used to investigate the localization and expression levels of VHR. RESULTS: We report that VHR is upregulated in (pre) neoplastic lesions (squamous intraepithelial lesions; SILs) of the uterine cervix mainly in high grade SIL (H-SIL) compared to normal exocervix. In the invasive cancer, VHR is also highly expressed with nuclear localization in the majority of cells compared to normal tissue where VHR is always in the cytoplasm. We also report that this phosphatase is highly expressed in several cervix cancer cell lines such as HeLa, SiHa, CaSki, C33 and HT3 compared to primary keratinocytes. The immunofluorescence technique under confocal microscopy shows that VHR has a cytoplasmic localization in primary keratinocytes, while it localizes in both cytoplasm and nucleus of the cancer cell lines investigated. We report that the up-regulation of this phosphatase is mainly due to its post-translational stabilization in the cancer cell lines compared to primary keratinocytes rather than increases in the transcription of DUSP3 locus. CONCLUSION: These results together suggest that VHR can be considered as a new marker for cancer progression in cervix carcinoma and potential new target for anticancer therapy. [less ▲]

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