References of "Radioti, Aikaterini"
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See detailRecurrent pulsations in Saturn’s high latitude magnetosphere
Mitchell, D.G.; Carbary, J.F.; Bunce, E.J. et al

in Icarus (in press)

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See detailSaturn’s auroral morphology and field-aligned currents during a solar wind compression
Badman, S.V.; Provan, G.; Bunce, E.J. et al

in Icarus (in press)

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See detailMagnetosphere-ionosphere mapping at Jupiter: Quantifying the effects of using different internal field models
Vogt, Marissa; Bunce, Emma; Kivelson, Margaret et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2015), 120

The lack of global field models accurate beyond the inner magnetosphere (<30 RJ) makes it difficult to relate Jupiter's polar auroral features to magnetospheric source regions. We recently developed a ... [more ▼]

The lack of global field models accurate beyond the inner magnetosphere (<30 RJ) makes it difficult to relate Jupiter's polar auroral features to magnetospheric source regions. We recently developed a model that maps Jupiter's equatorial magnetosphere to the ionosphere using a flux equivalence calculation that requires equal flux at the equatorial and ionospheric ends of flux tubes. This approach is more accurate than tracing field lines in a global field model but only if it is based on an accurate model of Jupiter's internal field. At present there are three widely used internal field models—Voyager Io Pioneer 4 (VIP4), the Grodent Anomaly Model (GAM), and VIP Anomaly Longitude (VIPAL). The purpose of this study is to quantify how the choice of an internal field model affects the mapping of various auroral features using the flux equivalence calculation. We find that different internal field models can shift the ionospheric mapping of points in the equatorial plane by several degrees and shift the magnetospheric mapping to the equator by ~30 RJ radially and by less than 1 h in local time. These shifts are consistent with differences in how well each model maps the Ganymede footprint, underscoring the need for more accurate Jovian internal field models. We discuss differences in the mapping of specific auroral features and the size and location of the open/closed field line boundary. Understanding these differences is important for the continued analysis of Hubble Space Telescope images and in planning for Juno's arrival at Jupiter in 2016. [less ▲]

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See detailThe EChO science case
Tinetti, Giovanna; Drossart, Pierre; Eccleston, Paul et al

in ArXiv e-prints (2015), 1502

The discovery of almost 2000 exoplanets has revealed an unexpectedly diverse planet population. Observations to date have shown that our Solar System is certainly not representative of the general ... [more ▼]

The discovery of almost 2000 exoplanets has revealed an unexpectedly diverse planet population. Observations to date have shown that our Solar System is certainly not representative of the general population of planets in our Milky Way. The key science questions that urgently need addressing are therefore: What are exoplanets made of? Why are planets as they are? What causes the exceptional diversity observed as compared to the Solar System? EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory) has been designed as a dedicated survey mission for transit and eclipse spectroscopy capable of observing a large and diverse planet sample within its four-year mission lifetime. EChO can target the atmospheres of super-Earths, Neptune-like, and Jupiter-like planets, in the very hot to temperate zones (planet temperatures of 300K-3000K) of F to M-type host stars. Over the next ten years, several new ground- and space-based transit surveys will come on-line (e.g. NGTS, CHEOPS, TESS, PLATO), which will specifically focus on finding bright, nearby systems. The current rapid rate of discovery would allow the target list to be further optimised in the years prior to EChO's launch and enable the atmospheric characterisation of hundreds of planets. Placing the satellite at L2 provides a cold and stable thermal environment, as well as a large field of regard to allow efficient time-critical observation of targets randomly distributed over the sky. A 1m class telescope is sufficiently large to achieve the necessary spectro-photometric precision. The spectral coverage (0.5-11 micron, goal 16 micron) and SNR to be achieved by EChO, thanks to its high stability and dedicated design, would enable a very accurate measurement of the atmospheric composition and structure of hundreds of exoplanets. [less ▲]

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See detailBridging Space Weather to Planetary Environments
Plainaki; Milillo; Andriopoulou et al

Conference (2015)

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See detailTransient small-scale structure in the main auroral emission at Jupiter
Palmaerts, Benjamin ULg; Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2014), 119

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See detailSolar Wind Interaction with the Magnetosphere of Jupiter : Impact on the Magnetopause and the Aurorae
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Conference (2014, November 20)

The outcome of the interaction between the solar wind and the Jovian magnetic field bears many differences compared to the Earth's case. At Earth, the solar wind is the major particle and energy source in ... [more ▼]

The outcome of the interaction between the solar wind and the Jovian magnetic field bears many differences compared to the Earth's case. At Earth, the solar wind is the major particle and energy source in the magnetosphere. At Jupiter, the tremendous volcanism on the moon Io is the main plasma source and Jupiter's rapid rotation (relative to its size) is the main energy source for the particles populating its magnetosphere. Combined with a weaker solar wind pressure and a larger Alfvén Mach number as the distance from the Sun increases, all these parameters modify the relative importance of large scale Dungey reconnection and viscous interaction at the magnetopause. In order to study these differences, here we present a statistical analysis of magnetopause waves and flux tube event on the Jovian magnetopause, based on in-situ measurement from the spacecraft that flew-by or orbited around Jupiter. Moreover, variations of the solar wind have significant impact on the Jovian magnetospheric current systems and such changes reflect on the aurora. In this presentation, we will also review the recent findings concerning the aurora at Jupiter and their relationship with the solar wind. [less ▲]

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See detailSearch for Satellite Effects on Saturn's Auroras in Cassini UVIS Data
Pryor, Wayne R.; Esposito, Larry; Jouchoux, Alain et al

in AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts (2014, November 01)

The Cassini UVIS has been obtaining Saturn auroral images since 2004. We have previously reported instances when the main auroral oval brightened briefly in a quasi-periodic fashion near the sub-Mimas ... [more ▼]

The Cassini UVIS has been obtaining Saturn auroral images since 2004. We have previously reported instances when the main auroral oval brightened briefly in a quasi-periodic fashion near the sub-Mimas longitude. Here we examine the large set of auroral images obtained from close range and high sub-spacecraft latitudes. We will plot the brightness of the individual auroral measurements as a function of local time, and as a function of the location of Mimas and other moons to test for any correlations. [less ▲]

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See detailSpace Weather at Saturn - Auroral observations
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

Conference (2014, November)

Unlike to Earth, Saturn is a fast rotator and its magnetosphere is dominated by fast planetary rotation and internally driven processes. However, the interaction of the solar wind with Saturn’s ... [more ▼]

Unlike to Earth, Saturn is a fast rotator and its magnetosphere is dominated by fast planetary rotation and internally driven processes. However, the interaction of the solar wind with Saturn’s magnetosphere is not negligible and it is manifested among others in the auroral region. The interplanetary magnetic field reconnects with the dayside magnetopause at Saturn and results in enhancements in the auroral emission accompanied by entry of significant amount of open flux in the magnetosphere. The solar wind affects also the nightside magnetosphere. Dramatic enhancements of the nightside-dawn auroral emissions have been attributed to solar wind-induced auroral storms. Additionally, recent auroral observations revealed the presence of a transpolar arc at Saturn, one of the most spectacular auroral features at Earth, which could be possibly related to solar wind driven tail reconnection. Finally, there is evidence of viscous interaction of the solar wind with Saturn’s magnetosphere, which involves magnetic reconnection on a small scale. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping the electron energy in Jupiter’s aurora: Hubble spectral observations
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2014), 119

Far ultraviolet spectral observations have been made with the Hubble Space Telescope in the time-tag mode using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) long slit. The telescope was slewed in such ... [more ▼]

Far ultraviolet spectral observations have been made with the Hubble Space Telescope in the time-tag mode using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) long slit. The telescope was slewed in such a way that the slit projection scanned from above the polar limb down to midlatitudes, allowing us to build up the first spectral maps of the FUV Jovian aurora. The shorter wavelengths are partly absorbed by the methane layer overlying part of the auroral emission layer. The long-wavelength intensity directly reflects the precipitated energy flux carried by the auroral electrons. Maps of the intensity ratio of the two spectral regions have been obtained by combining spectral emissions in two wavelength ranges. They show that the amount of absorption by methane varies significantly between the different components of the aurora and inside the main emission region. Some of the polar emissions are associated with the hardest precipitation, although the auroral regions of strong electron precipitation do not necessarily coincide with the highest electron energies. Outputs from an electron transport model are used to create maps of the distribution of the characteristic electron energies. Using model atmospheres adapted to auroral conditions, we conclude that electron energies range between a few tens to several hundred keV. Comparisons of derived energies are in general agreement with those calculated from magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling models, with values locally exceeding the standard model predictions. These results will provide useful input for three-dimensional modeling of the distribution of particle heat sources into the high-latitude Jovian upper atmosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailJupiter’s magnetopause: A search for wave and reconnection signatures
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K. et al

Conference (2014, September 12)

Surface waves and magnetic reconnection are two key processes taking place at the planetary magnetopause. They allow the coupling, through energy (and particle) transfer, of the interplanetary medium and ... [more ▼]

Surface waves and magnetic reconnection are two key processes taking place at the planetary magnetopause. They allow the coupling, through energy (and particle) transfer, of the interplanetary medium and the magnetosphere. The relative importance of large scale Dungey reconnection and viscous interaction (including small-scale intermittent reconnection associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices) are expected to be different at Jupiter compared to the Earth’s case. Such differences would be due to the combination of a) a weaker solar wind pressure and Alfvén velocity as the distance to the Sun increases, b) a high-β plasma sheet, originating from Io’s outgassing, which inflates the Jovian magnetosphere, c) the rapid rotation of the planet relative to its size (e.g. Desroche et al. 2012). Here we analyse the signatures of wave activity and reconnection on the magnetopause of Jupiter, based on magnetic field and energetic particle measurements from the successive spacecraft that explored the Jovian system. Up to now, 7 spacecraft equipped with a magnetometer have crossed the Jovian magnetopause: Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, Voyager 1, Voyager 2, Ulysses, Galileo and Cassini. We make use of several normal direction finding techniques, such as the Minimum Variance Analysis, in order to identify waves and Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices. As far as the reconnection is concerned, small scale signatures of flux-tube events (FTEs) had been identified by Walker and Russell (1985), based on a limited data-set from the Pioneers’ and Voyagers’ fly-bys. Here we will extend this search to the extensive dataset from all the missions that explored Jupiter’s system. [less ▲]

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See detailJupiter's equatorward auroral features : Possible signature of magnetospheric injections
Dumont, Maïté ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Radioti, Aikaterini ULg et al

Conference (2014, September)

We investigate the characteristics of ultraviolet auroral features located equatorward of the main emission appearing in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained in 2000-2007. Several properties ... [more ▼]

We investigate the characteristics of ultraviolet auroral features located equatorward of the main emission appearing in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained in 2000-2007. Several properties of the auroral emissions are analyzed. The mapped radial position and System III longitude of the observed auroral features are in good agreement with those of the injections observed in the equatorial plane by Galileo. Finally, we discuss the processes causing auroral signatures of injections. This comparative study demonstrates that the structures under study are most probably related to magnetospheric injections and sheds light to the mechanism involved in the magnetosphere-ionosphere dynamics. [less ▲]

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See detailSpectral mapping of the FUV Jovian aurora and electron energy distribution
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

Conference (2014, September)

Observations have been made with the Hubble Space Telescope in the timetag mode using the STIS long slit. During the 40 min of the observations, the slit spatially scanned the polar regions to build ... [more ▼]

Observations have been made with the Hubble Space Telescope in the timetag mode using the STIS long slit. During the 40 min of the observations, the slit spatially scanned the polar regions to build spectral maps of the jovian aurora. The emission is composed of the HI Lyman-alpha line and the H2 Lyman and Werner bands. The shorter wavelengths are partly absorbed by the methane layer overlying the bulk of the auroral emission. Since the CH4 absorption cross section drastically drops above 140 nm, the longer wavelengths are not absorbed and the intensity directly reflects the precipitated energy flux carried by the electrons. Maps of the intensity ratio of the two spectral regions will be presented, together with the associated auroral electron energy. These values will be compared with those expected from current magnetosphere-ionosphere model. They will provide input into 3-D modeling of the auroral heat source into the high-latitude Jovian upper atmosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailSaturn’s elusive nightside polar arc
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2014)

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See detailCassini Ultraviolet Images of Saturn's Aurorae
Pryor, Wayne; Jouchoux, Alain; Esposito, Larry et al

Scientific conference (2014, August 04)

Cassini has been obtaining auroral images and spectra of Saturn with the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS). We will present highlights of the auroral images, showing a variety of morphologies ... [more ▼]

Cassini has been obtaining auroral images and spectra of Saturn with the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS). We will present highlights of the auroral images, showing a variety of morphologies, including multiple arcs, spiral forms, polar cusp activity, and rotating emission features, some of them pulsating with a roughly 1-hour period. A satellite footprint of Enceladus is occasionally visible. [less ▲]

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See detailAuroral emissions of Jupiter and Saturn and satellite footprints
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg

Conference (2014, August)

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See detailAuroral signatures of reconnection at Saturn and comparison with Earth
Radioti, Aikaterini ULg

Conference (2014, July)

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See detailQuasi-periodic flares in Jupiter's aurora : new results
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Badman, Sarah et al

Conference (2014, April 29)

Two recent Hubble Space Telescope observation campaigns have been dedicated to the Jovian Far-UV aurora (GO 12883 – PI: D. Grodent and GO 13035 – PI: S. Badman). Both of them made use of the Time-Tag mode ... [more ▼]

Two recent Hubble Space Telescope observation campaigns have been dedicated to the Jovian Far-UV aurora (GO 12883 – PI: D. Grodent and GO 13035 – PI: S. Badman). Both of them made use of the Time-Tag mode of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), a high time resolution mode which allows to observe temporal variations on timescales of tens of seconds. In the present study, we focus on sudden and spectacular bursts of auroral emissions taking place in the active region located poleward of the main emissions and called “flares”. A previous study, based on only two image sequences acquired with rather unfavorable viewing angles, showed that these flares could reappear quasi-periodically on time scales of 2-3 minutes. Phenomena with similar timescales have been identified by in-situ spacecraft in relativistic electron and radio data as well as in reconnection signatures, for example. But the physical mechanism behind these ubiquitous signatures remains to be unveiled. Here we make use of the most recent and much larger data set to study in further details the occurrence rate, the period, the location, the extent and the motion of these quasi-periodic flares and to compare their behavior in both hemispheres. Quantifying these parameters allows us to narrow down the possibilities among likely explanations and provide a tentative scenario for these short timescale quasi-periodic features. [less ▲]

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