References of "Rabus, M"
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See detailA Super-Jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406
Tsapras, Y.; Choi, J.-Y.; Street, R. A. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2014), 782

We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the lightcurve ... [more ▼]

We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the lightcurve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a $2.73\pm 0.43\ M_{\rm J}$ planet orbiting a $0.44\pm 0.07\ M_{\odot}$ early M-type star. The distance to the lens is $4.97\pm 0.29$\ kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is $3.45\pm 0.26$ AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysical properties and transmission spectrum of the WASP-80 planetary system from multi-colour photometry
Mancini, L.; Southworth, J.; Ciceri, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 1312

WASP-80 is one of only two systems known to contain a hot Jupiter which transits its M-dwarf host star. We present eight light curves of one transit event, obtained simultaneously using two defocussed ... [more ▼]

WASP-80 is one of only two systems known to contain a hot Jupiter which transits its M-dwarf host star. We present eight light curves of one transit event, obtained simultaneously using two defocussed telescopes. These data were taken through the Bessell I, Sloan griz and near-infrared JHK passbands. We use our data to search for opacity-induced changes in the planetary radius, but find that all values agree with each other. Our data are therefore consistent with a flat transmission spectrum to within the observational uncertainties. We also measure an activity index of the host star of log R'_HK=-4.495, meaning that WASP-80A shows strong chromospheric activity. The non-detection of starspots implies that, if they exist, they must be small and symmetrically distributed on the stellar surface. We model all available optical transit light curves to obtain improved physical properties and orbital ephemerides for the system. [less ▲]

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See detailA detailed census of variable stars in the globular cluster NGC 6333 (M9) from CCD differential photometry
Arellano Ferro, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Figuera Jaimes, R. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2013), 434

We report CCD V and I time series photometry of the globular cluster NGC 6333 (M9). The technique of difference image analysis has been used, which enables photometric precision better than 0.05 mag for ... [more ▼]

We report CCD V and I time series photometry of the globular cluster NGC 6333 (M9). The technique of difference image analysis has been used, which enables photometric precision better than 0.05 mag for stars brighter than V ˜ 19.0 mag, even in the crowded central regions of the cluster. The high photometric precision has resulted in the discovery of two new RRc stars, three eclipsing binaries, seven long-term variables and one field RRab star behind the cluster. A detailed identification chart and equatorial coordinates are given for all the variable stars in the field of our images of the cluster. Our data together with the literature V-data obtained in 1994 and 1995 allowed us to refine considerably the periods for all RR Lyrae stars. The nature of the new variables is discussed. We argue that variable V12 is a cluster member and an Anomalous Cepheid. Secular period variations, double-mode pulsations and/or the Blazhko-like modulations in some RRc variables are addressed. Through the light-curve Fourier decomposition of 12 RR Lyrae stars we have calculated a mean metallicity of [Fe/H][SUB]ZW[/SUB] = -1.70 ± 0.01(statistical) ± 0.14(systematic) or [Fe/H]_{text{UVES}}=-1.67 ± 0.01(statistical) ± 0.19(systematic). Absolute magnitudes, radii and masses are also estimated for the RR Lyrae stars. A detailed search for SX Phe stars in the Blue Straggler region was conducted but none were discovered. If SX Phe exist in the cluster then their amplitudes must be smaller than the detection limit of our photometry. The colour-magnitude diagram has been corrected for heavy differential reddening using the detailed extinction map of the cluster of Alonso-García et al. This has allowed us to set the mean cluster distance from two independent estimates; from the RRab and RRc absolute magnitudes, we find 8.04 ± 0.19 and 7.88 ± 0.30 kpc, respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimating the parameters of globular cluster M 30 (NGC 7099) from time-series photometry
Kains, N.; Bramich, D. M.; Arellano Ferro, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 555

<BR /> Aims: We present the analysis of 26 nights of V and I time-series observations from 2011 and 2012 of the globular cluster M 30 (NGC 7099). We used our data to search for variable stars in this ... [more ▼]

<BR /> Aims: We present the analysis of 26 nights of V and I time-series observations from 2011 and 2012 of the globular cluster M 30 (NGC 7099). We used our data to search for variable stars in this cluster and refine the periods of known variables; we then used our variable star light curves to derive values for the cluster's parameters. <BR /> Methods: We used difference image analysis to reduce our data to obtain high-precision light curves of variable stars. We then estimated the cluster parameters by performing a Fourier decomposition of the light curves of RR Lyrae stars for which a good period estimate was possible. We also derived an estimate for the age of the cluster by fitting theoretical isochrones to our colour-magnitude diagram (CMD). <BR /> Results: Out of 13 stars previously catalogued as variables, we find that only 4 are bona fide variables. We detect two new RR Lyrae variables, and confirm two additional RR Lyrae candidates from the literature. We also detect four other new variables, including an eclipsing blue straggler system, and an SX Phoenicis star. This amounts to a total number of confirmed variable stars in M 30 of 12. We perform Fourier decomposition of the light curves of the RR Lyrae stars to derive cluster parameters using empirical relations. We find a cluster metallicity [Fe/H][SUB]ZW[/SUB] = -2.01 ± 0.04, or [Fe/H][SUB]UVES[/SUB] = -2.11 ± 0.06, and a distance of 8.32 ± 0.20 kpc (using RR0 variables), 8.10 kpc (using one RR1 variable), and 8.35 ± 0.42 kpc (using our SX Phoenicis star detection in M 30). Fitting isochrones to the CMD, we estimate an age of 13.0 ± 1.0 Gyr for M 30. This work is based on data collected by MiNDSTEp with the Danish 1.54 m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory.The full light curves, an extract of which is shown in Table 2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr</A> (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/555/A36">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/555/A36</A>Tables 8-10, and Figs. 6 and 9 are available in electronic form at <A href="http://www.aanda.org">http://www.aanda.org</A> [less ▲]

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See detailEMCCD photometry reveals two new variable stars in the crowded central region of the globular cluster NGC 6981
Skottfelt, J.; Bramich, D. M.; Figuera Jaimes, R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 553

Two previously unknown variable stars in the crowded central region of the globular cluster NGC 6981 are presented. The observations were made using the electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera at the ... [more ▼]

Two previously unknown variable stars in the crowded central region of the globular cluster NGC 6981 are presented. The observations were made using the electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera at the Danish 1.54 m Telescope at La Silla, Chile. The two variableswere not previously detected by conventional CCD imaging because of their proximity to a bright star. This discovery demonstrates that EMCCDs are a powerful tool for performing high-precision time-series photometry in crowded fields and near bright stars, especially when combined with difference image analysis. Based on data collected by MiNDSTEp with the Danish 1.54 m telescope. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT LRa01 field
Carone, L.; Gandolfi, D.; Cabrera, J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose ... [more ▼]

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose lightcurves have transit-like features. An extensive analytical and observational follow-up effort is undertaken to classify these candidates. Aims: The list of planetary transit candidates from the CoRoT LRa01 star field in the Monoceros constellation towards the Galactic anti-center is presented. The CoRoT observations of LRa01 lasted from 24 October 2007 to 3 March 2008. Methods: 7470 chromatic and 3938 monochromatic lightcurves were acquired and analysed. Instrumental noise and stellar variability were treated with several filtering tools by different teams from the CoRoT community. Different transit search algorithms were applied to the lightcurves. Results: Fifty-one stars were classified as planetary transit candidates in LRa01. Thirty-seven (i.e., 73 % of all candidates) are "good" planetary candidates based on photometric analysis only. Thirty-two (i.e., 87 % of the "good" candidates) have been followed-up. At the time of this writing twenty-two cases have been solved and five planets have been discovered: three transiting hot-Jupiters (CoRoT-5b, CoRoT-12b, and CoRoT-21b), the first terrestrial transiting planet (CoRoT-7b), and another planet in the same system (CoRoT-7c, detected by radial velocity survey only). Evidences of another non-transiting planet in the CoRoT-7 system, namely CoRoT-7d, have been recently found. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT-SRc01 field
Erikson, A.; Santerne, A.; Renner, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 539

Context. The space mission CoRoT is devoted to the analysis of stellar variability and the photometric detection of extrasolar planets. <BR /> Aims: We present the list of planetary transit candidates ... [more ▼]

Context. The space mission CoRoT is devoted to the analysis of stellar variability and the photometric detection of extrasolar planets. <BR /> Aims: We present the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first short run observed by CoRoT that targeted SRc01, towards the Galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from April to May 2007. <BR /> Methods: Among the acquired data, we analyzed those for 1269 sources in the chromatic bands and 5705 in the monochromatic band. Instrumental noise and the stellar variability were treated with several detrending tools, to which several transit-search algorithms were subsequently applied. <BR /> Results: Fifty-one sources were classified as planetary transit candidates and 26 were followed up with ground-based observations. Until now, no planet has been detected in the CoRoT data from the SRc01 field. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with contributions from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. The CoRoT data are available to the community from the CoRoT archive: <A href="http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr">http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr</A>Based in part on observations made with the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute Provence (CNRS), France (SOPHIE Program 08A.PNP.MOUT).Based in part on observations made with the ESO-3.60-m telescope at La Silla Observatory (ESO), Chile (HARPS Program ESO - 081.C-0388) and with the ESO-VLT telescope at Paranal Observatory (ESO), Chile (FLAMES Program ESO - 081.C-0413). [less ▲]

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See detailThe HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets XXXII. Only 4 planets in the Gl~581 system
Forveille, T.; Bonfils, X.; Delfosse, X. et al

E-print/Working paper (2011)

The Gl 581 planetary system has generated wide interest, because its 4 planets include both the lowest mass planet known around a main sequence star other than the Sun and the first super-Earth planet in ... [more ▼]

The Gl 581 planetary system has generated wide interest, because its 4 planets include both the lowest mass planet known around a main sequence star other than the Sun and the first super-Earth planet in the habitable zone of its star. A recent paper announced the possible discovery of two additional super-Earth planets in that system, one of which would be in the middle of the habitable zone of Gl 581. The statistical significance of those two discoveries has, however, been questioned. We have obtained 121 new radial velocity measurements of Gl 581 with the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO 3.6 m telescope, and analyse those together with our previous 119 measurements of that star to examine these potential additional planets. We find that neither is likely to exist with their proposed parameters. We also obtained photometric observations with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope during a potential transit of the inner planet, Gl 581e, which had a 5% geometric transit probability. Those observations exclude transits for planet densities under 4 times the Earth density within -0.2 sigma to +2.7 sigma of the predicted transit center. [less ▲]

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See detailExoplanet discoveries with the CoRoT space observatory
Lammer, H.; Dvorak, R.; Deleuil, M. et al

in Solar System Research (2010), 44

The CoRoT space observatory is a project which is led by the French space agency CNES and leading space research institutes in Austria, Brazil, Belgium, Germany and Spain and also the European Space ... [more ▼]

The CoRoT space observatory is a project which is led by the French space agency CNES and leading space research institutes in Austria, Brazil, Belgium, Germany and Spain and also the European Space Agency ESA. CoRoT observed since its launch in December 27, 2006 about 100 000 stars for the exoplanet channel, during 150 days uninterrupted high-precision photometry. Since the The CoRoT-team has several exoplanet candidates which are currently analyzed under its study, we report here the discoveries of nine exoplanets which were observed by CoRoT. Discovered exoplanets such as CoRoT-3b populate the brown dwarf desert and close the gap of measured physical properties between usual gas giants and very low mass stars. CoRoT discoveries extended the known range of planet masses down to about 4.8 Earth-masses (CoRoT-7b) and up to 21 Jupiter masses (CoRoT-3b), the radii to about 1.68 × 0.09 R [SUB]Earth[/SUB] (CoRoT-7b) and up to the most inflated hot Jupiter with 1.49 × 0.09 R [SUB]Earth[/SUB] found so far (CoRoT-1b), and the transiting exoplanet with the longest period of 95.274 days (CoRoT-9b). Giant exoplanets have been detected at low metallicity, rapidly rotating and active, spotted stars. Two CoRoT planets have host stars with the lowest content of heavy elements known to show a transit hinting towards a different planethost-star-metallicity relation then the one found by radial-velocity search programs. Finally the properties of the CoRoT-7b prove that rocky planets with a density close to Earth exist outside the Solar System. Finally the detection of the secondary transit of CoRoT-1b at a sensitivity level of 10[SUP]-5[/SUP] and the very clear detection of the "super-Earth" CoRoT-7b at 3.5 × 10[SUP]-4[/SUP] relative flux are promising evidence that the space observatory is being able to detect even smaller exoplanets with the size of the Earth. [less ▲]

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See detailA transiting giant planet with a temperature between 250K and 430K
Deeg, H. J.; Moutou, C.; Erikson, A. et al

in Nature (2010), 464

Of the over 400 known exoplanets, there are about 70 planets that transit their central star, a situation that permits the derivation of their basic parameters and facilitates investigations of their ... [more ▼]

Of the over 400 known exoplanets, there are about 70 planets that transit their central star, a situation that permits the derivation of their basic parameters and facilitates investigations of their atmospheres. Some short-period planets, including the first terrestrial exoplanet (CoRoT-7b), have been discovered using a space mission designed to find smaller and more distant planets than can be seen from the ground. Here we report transit observations of CoRoT-9b, which orbits with a period of 95.274days on a low eccentricity of 0.11+/-0.04 around a solar-like star. Its periastron distance of 0.36 astronomical units is by far the largest of all transiting planets, yielding a `temperate' photospheric temperature estimated to be between 250 and 430K. Unlike previously known transiting planets, the present size of CoRoT-9b should not have been affected by tidal heat dissipation processes. Indeed, the planet is found to be well described by standard evolution models with an inferred interior composition consistent with that of Jupiter and Saturn. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in CoRoT-LRc01 field
Cabrera, J.; Fridlund, M.; Ollivier, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

Aims: We present here the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first long run observed by CoRoT: LRc01, towards the galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from May to ... [more ▼]

Aims: We present here the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first long run observed by CoRoT: LRc01, towards the galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from May to October 2007. <BR />Methods: we analyzed 3719 (33%) sources in the chromatic bands and 7689 in the monochromatic band. Instrumental noise and the stellar variability were treated with several detrending tools, on which subsequently several transit search algorithms were applied. <BR />Results: Forty two sources were classified as planetary transit candidates and up to now 26 cases have been solved. One planet (CoRoT-2b) and one brown-dwarf (CoRoT-3b) have been the subjects of detailed publications. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27 2006, was developed and is operated by CNES, with contributions from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany and Spain. The first CoRoT data are available to the community from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. VII. The ``hot-Jupiter''-type planet CoRoT-5b
Rauer, H.; Queloz, D.; Csizmadia, Szilard et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

Aims: The CoRoT space mission continues to photometrically monitor about 12 000 stars in its field-of-view for a series of target fields to search for transiting extrasolar planets ever since 2007. Deep ... [more ▼]

Aims: The CoRoT space mission continues to photometrically monitor about 12 000 stars in its field-of-view for a series of target fields to search for transiting extrasolar planets ever since 2007. Deep transit signals can be detected quickly in the â alarm-modeâ in parallel to the ongoing target field monitoring. CoRoT's first planets have been detected in this mode. <BR />Methods: The CoRoT raw lightcurves are filtered for orbital residuals, outliers, and low-frequency stellar signals. The phase folded lightcurve is used to fit the transit signal and derive the main planetary parameters. Radial velocity follow-up observations were initiated to secure the detection and to derive the planet mass. <BR />Results: We report the detection of CoRoT-5b, detected during observations of the LRa01 field, the first long-duration field in the galactic anti-center direction. CoRoT-5b is a â hot Jupiter-typeâ planet with a radius of 1.388[SUP]+0.046[/SUP][SUB]-0.047[/SUB] R_Jup, a mass of 0.467[SUP]+0.047[/SUP][SUB]-0.024[/SUB] M_Jup, and therefore, a mean density of 0.217[SUP]+0.031[/SUP][SUB]-0.025[/SUB] g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. The planet orbits an F9V star of 14.0 mag in 4.0378962 ± 0.0000019 days at an orbital distance of 0.04947[SUP]+0.00026[/SUP][SUB]-0.00029[/SUB] AU. Observations made with SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (07B.PNP.MOUT), France, and HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (072.C-0488(E), 082.C-0312(A)), and partly based on observations made at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, was developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT initial run: resolving their nature
Moutou, C.; Pont, F.; Bouchy, F. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

With the release of CoRoT lightcurves of the Initial Run IRa01, 50 transiting planetary candidates have been published in a companion paper. About twenty of them were identified as binary stars from the ... [more ▼]

With the release of CoRoT lightcurves of the Initial Run IRa01, 50 transiting planetary candidates have been published in a companion paper. About twenty of them were identified as binary stars from the CoRoT lightcurve itself. Complementary observations were conducted for 29 candidates, including ground-based photometry and radial-velocity measurements. Two giant planets were identified and fully characterized. Nineteen binaries are recognized, from which 10 are background eclipsing binaries in the CoRoT mask or triple systems, diluted by the main CoRoT target. Eight cases remain of unclear origin, one of them still being a planetary candidate. Comparison with simulations shows that the actual threshold of confirmed planet detection in this field does not yet fulfill the expectations, and a number of reasons are invoked, like the ranking process based on lightcurve analyses, and the strategy and limits of follow-up observations for targets fainter than magnitude 15. Based on data obtained at Observatoire de Haute Provence with SOPHIE and with HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil , ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Tables 2 to 13, 15 to 17 and Figs. 4 to 7 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. V. CoRoT-Exo-4b: stellar and planetary parameters
Moutou, C.; Bruntt, H.; Guillot, T. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 488

Aims. The CoRoT satellite has announced its fourth transiting planet (Aigrain et al. 2008, A&A, 488, L43) with space photometry. We describe and analyse complementary observations of this system performed ... [more ▼]

Aims. The CoRoT satellite has announced its fourth transiting planet (Aigrain et al. 2008, A&A, 488, L43) with space photometry. We describe and analyse complementary observations of this system performed to establish the planetary nature of the transiting body and to estimate the fundamental parameters of the planet and its parent star. Methods: We have analysed high precision radial-velocity data, ground-based photometry, and high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopy. Results: The parent star CoRoT-Exo-4 (2MASS 06484671-0040219) is a late F-type star of mass of 1.16 M[SUB]o[/SUB] and radius of 1.17 R[SUB]o[/SUB]. The planet has a circular orbit with a period of 9.20205 d. The planet radius is 1.19 R_Jup and the mass is 0.72 M_Jup. It is a gas-giant planet with a ``normal'' internal structure of mainly H and He. CoRoT-Exo-4b has the second longest period of the known transiting planets. It is an important discovery since it occupies an empty area in the mass-period diagram of transiting exoplanets. Based on observations obtained with CoRoT, a space project operated by the French Space Agency, CNES, with participation of the Science Programme of ESA, ESTEC/RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain; and on observations made with the SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (PNP.07B.MOUT), and the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (079.C-0127/F). Table 2 and Fig. 5 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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