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See detailAn ESR, Mass Spectrometry and Fluorescence microscopy approach to study the stearic acid derivatives anchoring in cells
Grammenos, Angeliki ULg; Fillet, Marianne ULg; Collodoro, Mike et al

in Applied Magnetic Resonance (2012)

Lateral phase separations in biological membranes are of great interest, making Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy combined with spin labelling a non destructive and sensitive technique for the ... [more ▼]

Lateral phase separations in biological membranes are of great interest, making Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy combined with spin labelling a non destructive and sensitive technique for the study of lipid rafts. This is currently accepted that spin probe localization is on the plasma membrane. However, no study confirms this hypothesis. Herein, we report, for the first time, an accurate multi spectral method for the quantification of lipid spin label presence in every sub-cellular fraction. Cells were incubated with 5-doxyl stearic acid derivative and then sub-fractionated. Results of our multimodal spectroscopy approach ubiquitously demonstrate that the presence of ESR spin label only sets in the plasma membranes. [less ▲]

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See detailChronic ethanol exposure during adolescence alters the behavioral responsiveness to ethanol in adult mice
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Didone, Vincent ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2012), 229

Alcohol exposure during early adolescence is believed to durably alter the behavioral properties of ethanol, increasing the likelihood of later alcohol-related disorders. The aim of the present ... [more ▼]

Alcohol exposure during early adolescence is believed to durably alter the behavioral properties of ethanol, increasing the likelihood of later alcohol-related disorders. The aim of the present experiments was to characterize changes in the behavioral effects of ethanol in adult female Swiss mice after a chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence, extending from postnatal day 28 to postnatal day 42. After a chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence (daily injections of 0, 2.5 or 4 g/kg ethanol for 14 consecutive days), adult mice were tested at postnatal day 63. The locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol, together with ethanol sensitization were tested in experiment 1. In experiment 2, the sedative effects of ethanol were assessed with the loss of righting reflex procedure. Finally, in experiment 3, the anxiolytic effects of ethanol were tested with the light/dark box test. Adult mice chronically exposed to ethanol during adolescence showed a lower basal locomotor activity, but higher locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol than non-exposed mice. Additionally, these adult mice developed higher rates of ethanol sensitization after chronic re-exposure to ethanol in adulthood. Adult mice exposed to ethanol during adolescence also had a stronger tolerance to the sedative effects of high ethanol doses, although they showed no evidence of changes in the anxiolytic effects of ethanol. These results are in agreement with the thesis that chronic alcohol consumption during adolescence, especially in high amounts, increases the risk of later alcohol-related disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopmental differences in ethanol-induced sensitization using postweanling, adolescent, and adult Swiss mice
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Didone, Vincent ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

in Psychopharmacology (2012), 219

Rationale: The maturing adolescent brain has been suggested to be more sensitive than the adult brain to ethanol-induced neuroadaptations. In animal studies, sensitization to the stimulant effects of ... [more ▼]

Rationale: The maturing adolescent brain has been suggested to be more sensitive than the adult brain to ethanol-induced neuroadaptations. In animal studies, sensitization to the stimulant effects of ethanol is used to study the vulnerability to chronic ethanol-induced neurobehavioral alterations. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to systematically characterize age-dependent changes in the development and expression of the sensitization to the stimulant effects of a range of ethanol doses in female Swiss mice. Three ages were studied: 21-day-old mice (postweanlings), 35-day-old mice (adolescents), and 63-day-old mice (adults). Methods: Postweanling, adolescent, and adult mice were daily injected with saline or various ethanol doses (1.5 to 4 g/kg) for 7 days. They were then tested for acute and sensitized locomotor activity. Results: Postweanling and adolescent mice were more sensitive than adult mice to the acute stimulant effects of ethanol. In adult mice, daily injections of ethanol at doses between 2.5 and 4 g/kg led to significant sensitization. Higher ethanol doses (3.5 and 4 g/kg) were required to induce sensitization in postweanling and adolescent mice. However, younger mice showed ethanol sensitization of higher magnitude. Conclusions: Young mice develop very strong ethanol sensitization at doses that mimic binge drinking in humans. These results might explain why early ethanol drinking during adolescence is related to a higher prevalence of subsequent alcohol disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailStimulant effects of ethanol in adolescent Swiss mice: development of sensitization and consequences in adulthood
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Didone, Vincent ULg; Quertemont, Etienne ULg

in Alcohol & Alcoholism (2011), 46(Supplément 1), 40

The adolescent period is characterized by behavioral and neurobiological changes, which might predispose adolescents to the long-term negative consequences of alcohol. For example, enhanced risks of ... [more ▼]

The adolescent period is characterized by behavioral and neurobiological changes, which might predispose adolescents to the long-term negative consequences of alcohol. For example, enhanced risks of alcohol dependence are reported when drinking is initiated early. In the present studies, we used Swiss female mice to test whether chronic ethanol injections during adolescence durably affect the sensitivity to the stimulant effects of ethanol in adulthood. In a first set of experiments, several groups of young (28 day-old) mice were daily injected with various ethanol doses (1.5 – 4 g/kg) to test for ethanol sensitization during adolescence in comparison to adult mice exposed to the same schedule of ethanol injections. The results show that young mice express much higher stimulant effects after acute ethanol injections. However, they also require higher ethanol doses than adult mice to develop a sensitization to the stimulant effects of ethanol. In a second set of experiments, 28 day-old mice were sensitized to ethanol for 14 days with high ethanol doses (2.5 or 4 g/kg) and then tested for the stimulant effects of ethanol and the development of ethanol sensitization in adulthood. The results of this second set of experiments show that mice sensitized to ethanol during their adolescence remain more sensitive to the acute stimulant effects of ethanol in adulthood, especially when high ethanol doses were administered. However, the rate of the development of a sensitization to this effect was only slightly affected relative to adult mice exposed to a chronic ethanol regimen for the first time. Together, these results indicate that adolescent mice are more sensitive to the stimulant effects of ethanol but require higher ethanol doses to develop a sensitization. However, when a sensitization develops during adolescence, these mice still experience higher ethanol stimulant effects when tested in adulthood. [less ▲]

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See detailGradual changes in the sensitivity to the stimulant and sedative effects of ethanol during adolescence in Swiss mice
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Didone, Vincent ULg; Quertemont, Etienne ULg

in Alcoholism, Clinical & Experimental Research (2010), 34(8), 97-97

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See detailOntogeny of the stimulant and sedative effects of ethanol in male and female Swiss mice: gradual changes from weaning to adulthood
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Didone, Vincent ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

in Psychopharmacology (2010), 212(4), 501-512

Rationale: The adolescent period is characterized by a specific sensitivity to the effects of alcohol, which is believed to contribute to the enhanced risks of alcohol dependence when drinking is ... [more ▼]

Rationale: The adolescent period is characterized by a specific sensitivity to the effects of alcohol, which is believed to contribute to the enhanced risks of alcohol dependence when drinking is initiated early during adolescence. In adolescent rodents, while the reduced sensitivity to the sedative effects of ethanol has been well characterized, its stimulant effects have not yet been extensively studied. Objectives: The present study characterized the development of the stimulant and sedative effects of acute ethanol in male and female Swiss mice from weaning to early adulthood and tested whether both effects are interrelated. Methods: In a first experiment, mice aged 21, 28, 35, 42 and 60 days were injected with various ethanol doses and tested for ethanol-induced locomotor activity. In an independent experiment, mice of the same groups of age were injected with 4 g/kg ethanol and ethanol-induced sedation was quantified with the loss of righting reflex procedure. Results: In male and female mice, the stimulant effects of ethanol gradually decreased, whereas its sedative effects increased with age. When the sedation was statistically controlled using a covariance analysis, the differences between adult and juvenile mice in the locomotor stimulation were significantly reduced. Conclusions: From weaning to early adulthood, the acute stimulant and sedative effects of ethanol show gradual changes that are similar in male and female mice. Although the initial tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol contribute to the changes in ethanol-induced locomotor activity, young mice also show a higher sensitivity to the stimulant effects of ethanol. [less ▲]

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See detailParametric analysis of the development and expression of ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization in female Swiss mice: effects of dose, injection schedule, and test context.
Didone, Vincent ULg; Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

in Psychopharmacology (2008), 201(2), 249-60

RATIONALE: Repeated administrations of ethanol induce a progressive and enduring increase in its locomotor stimulant effects, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization that has not been systematically ... [more ▼]

RATIONALE: Repeated administrations of ethanol induce a progressive and enduring increase in its locomotor stimulant effects, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization that has not been systematically characterized. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present studies was to characterize the development and expression of ethanol sensitization in female Swiss mice by examining (1) the doses of ethanol that induce behavioral sensitization, (2) the doses of acute ethanol challenges that are necessary to express behavioral sensitization, (3) the effects of the intervals between administrations, and (4) the context dependency of ethanol sensitization. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice were i.p. injected for 8 days with various ethanol doses, and locomotion was recorded for 5 min. Two days after the last sensitization session, ethanol sensitization was tested in 30-min test sessions. RESULTS: Mice repeatedly injected with 2.5 g/kg ethanol showed a progressive (200-300%) increase in locomotor activity. In response to a 2.5 g/kg ethanol challenge, the mice repeatedly treated with doses above 1.5 g/kg showed a significant sensitization. Following the induction of sensitization with the maximally effective sensitizing dose (2.5 g/kg), mice showed greater activation after challenges with 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 g/kg ethanol. The intervals (24, 48, or 96 h) between ethanol injections did not affect the induction or expression of sensitization. Finally, sensitization to 2.5 g/kg ethanol was expressed regardless of the context in which it was induced. CONCLUSIONS: Female Swiss mice develop a robust context-independent sensitization after repeated ethanol injections at all doses above 1.5 g/kg, including highly sedative doses such as 4 g/kg. [less ▲]

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