References of "Quinet, Muriel"
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See detailFood in a row : urban trees offer valuable floral resources to pollinating insects
Somme, Laurent; Moquet, Laura; Quinet, Muriel et al

in Urban Ecosystems (2016)

Urbanization affects the availability and diversity of floral resources (pollen and/or nectar) for wild pollinating insects. For example, urban green areas are characterized by an abundance of ornamental ... [more ▼]

Urbanization affects the availability and diversity of floral resources (pollen and/or nectar) for wild pollinating insects. For example, urban green areas are characterized by an abundance of ornamental plant species. Increasingly, trees are planted to improve the aesthetics of urban streets and parks. These urban trees might offer important floral resources to pollinating insects. To examine the suitability of urban trees as resources for pollinating insects, we investigated the chemical composition of pollen and nectar as well as the amount of nectar produced by the nine major insect-pollinated tree species planted in cities of Western Europe, namely Acer pseudoplatanus, Aesculus carnea, A. hippocastanum, Robinia pseudoacacia, Tilia cordata, T. x euchlora, T. x europaea, T. platyphyllos and T. tomentosa. The analyses revealed that globally the Tilia trees provide pollen with lower contents of polypeptides, amino acids and phytosterols compared with the other species. Urban tree flowers offer abundant nectar with relatively high sugar contents (0.16–1.28 mg/flower); sucrose was the predominant sugar in all nectars. The investigated tree species could therefore be considered in future city plantings. [less ▲]

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See detailDo floral resources influence pollination rates and subsequent fruit set in pear (Pyrus communis L.) and apple (Malus x domestica Borkh) cultivars ?
Quinet, Muriel; Warzée, Martin; Vanderplanck, Maryse ULg et al

in European Journal of Agronomy (2016), 77

Pear and apple are among the main fruit crops worldwide. These species can be planted in mixed orchards,and they both depend on insect pollination for fruit set. As pollinating insects are attracted by ... [more ▼]

Pear and apple are among the main fruit crops worldwide. These species can be planted in mixed orchards,and they both depend on insect pollination for fruit set. As pollinating insects are attracted by the floralresources, we investigated nectar and pollen production and chemical composition in four pear (‘Con-corde’, ‘Conférence’, ‘Doyenné du Comice’, ‘Triomphe de Vienne’) and five apple (‘Braeburn’, ‘GoldenReinders’, ‘Jonagored’, ‘Pinova’, ‘Wellant’) cultivars commonly grown in Belgium. We also investigatedwhether insect flower visitation rate and pollination efficiency are linked to floral resource quantityand quality. The pear cultivars flowered one week before the apple cultivars in early spring, and theirflowers were about six times less visited by insects. The visitors foraged more on the pollen of the peartrees and the nectar of the apple trees. [less ▲]

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See detailSalicylic acid differently impacts ethylene and polyamine synthesis in the glycophyte Solanum lycopersicum and the wild-related halophyte Solanum chilense exposed to mild salt stres
Gharbi, Emna; Martinez, Juan Pablo; Benahmed, Hela et al

in Physiologia Plantarum (2016), 171

This study aimed to determine the effects of exogenous application of salicylic acid on the toxic effects of salt in relation to ethylene and polyamine synthesis, and to correlate these traits with the ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to determine the effects of exogenous application of salicylic acid on the toxic effects of salt in relation to ethylene and polyamine synthesis, and to correlate these traits with the expression of genes involved in ethylene and polyamine metabolism in two tomato species differing in their sensitivity to salt stress, Solanum lycopersicum cv Ailsa Craig and its wild salt-resistant relative Solanum chilense. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh temperatures limit plant growth but hasten flowering in root chicory (Cichorium intybus) independently of vernalisation.
Mathieu, Anne-Sophie; Lutts, Stanley; Vandoorne, Bertrand et al

in Journal of Plant Physiology (2013), in press

An increase in mean and extreme summer temperatures is expected as a consequence of climate changes and this might have an impact on plant development in numerous species. Root chicory (Cichorium intybus ... [more ▼]

An increase in mean and extreme summer temperatures is expected as a consequence of climate changes and this might have an impact on plant development in numerous species. Root chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) is a major crop in northern Europe, and it is cultivated as a source of inulin. This polysaccharide is stored in the tap root during the first growing season when the plant grows as a leafy rosette, whereas bolting and flowering occur in the second year after winter vernalisation. The impact of heat stress on plant phenology, water status, photosynthesis-related parameters, and inulin content was studied in the field and under controlled phytotron conditions. In the field, plants of the Crescendo cultivar were cultivated under a closed plastic-panelled greenhouse to investigate heat-stress conditions, while the control plants were shielded with a similar, but open, structure. In the phytotrons, the Crescendo and Fredonia cultivars were exposed to high temperatures (35 °C day/ 28 °C night) and compared to control conditions (17 °C) over 10 weeks. In the field, heat reduced the root weight, the inulin content of the root and its degree of polymerisation in non-bolting plants. Flowering was observed in 12% of the heat stressed plants during the first growing season in the field. In the phytotron, the heat stress increased the total number of leaves per plant, but reduced the mean leaf area. Photosynthesis efficiency was increased in these plants, whereas osmotic potential was decreased. High temperature was also found to induce flowering of up to 50% of these plants, especially for the Fredonia cultivar. In conclusion, high temperatures induced a reduction in the growth of root chicory, although photosynthesis is not affected. Flowering was also induced, which indicates that high temperatures can partly substitute for the vernalisation requirement for the flowering of root chicory [less ▲]

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See detailRepression of floral meristem fate is crucial in shaping tomato inflorescence
Thouet, Johanna; Quinet, Muriel; Lutts, Stanley et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(2), 31096

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See detailThe promotive impact of high temperature on flowering in root chicory (Cichorium intybus L.)
Mathieu, Anne-Sophie; Vandoorne, Bertrand; Quinet, Muriel et al

Poster (2011)

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See detailRevisiting the involvement of SELF-PRUNING in the sympodial growth of tomato.
Thouet, Johanna ULg; Quinet, Muriel; Ormenese, Sandra ULg et al

in Plant Physiology (2008), 148(1), 61-4

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