References of "Putzeys, V"
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See detailControlled DCD donation is part of the solution to liver graft shortage, regardless of donor age
DETRY, Olivier ULg; MEURISSE, Nicolas ULg; DELWAIDE, Jean ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2014, March), 77(1), 16

Aim: Results of donation after circulatory death (DCD) liver transplantation (LT) are impaired by ischemic bile duct lesions caused by procurement warm ischemia. Donor age is a risk factor in deceased ... [more ▼]

Aim: Results of donation after circulatory death (DCD) liver transplantation (LT) are impaired by ischemic bile duct lesions caused by procurement warm ischemia. Donor age is a risk factor in deceased donor LT, and particularly in DCD-LT. At the authors institute, age is not an absolute exclusion criterion to discard DCD liver grafts, controlled DCD donors receive comfort therapy before withdrawal, and cold ischemia is minimized. The aim of the present study was to report on the results of the first 10 years of this experience, and particularly on graft survival and the rate of post-transplant biliary complications, according to DCD donor age. 
 Methods: The authors retrospectively studied a consecutive series of 70 DCD-LT performed from 2003 to 2012, with at least one year of follow-up. This series was divided according to donor’s age, including 32 liver grafts from donors <55years, 20 between 56 and 69 years, and 18 from older donors >69 years. The three groups were compared in terms of donor and recipient demographics, procurement and transplantation conditions, peak laboratory values during the first post-transplant 72 hours, and results at one and four years. Median follow-up was 43 months. 
 Results: Overall graft survival was 98.5%, 91.4% and 69.5% at 1 month, 1 year and 4 years, respectively, without graft loss secondary to ischemic bile duct lesions. Cancer was the primary cause of graft loss and patient death. No difference other than age was noted between the three groups in donor and recipient characteristics, and in procurement conditions. There was no primary non-function but one patient needed re-transplantation for artery thrombosis. Biliary complications occurred similarly in the three groups. Graft and patient survival rates were not different at one and four years between the three groups. During the study period, there was an increasing liver procurement and transplantation activity, and in 2012, 30% of performed LT were DCD-LT, allowing a mean LT waiting time of 66 days. 
 Conclusions: This study shows comparable results between controlled DCD-LT from younger and older donors. Donor age >50 years should not be a contraindication to DCD-LT if other donor risk factors (such as warm and cold ischemia time) are minimized. DCD-LT with short cold ischemia may provide a significant source of liver grafts, decreasing waiting time. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis C of genotype 2: the role of medical invasive exams.
Putzeys, V.; GERARD, Christiane ULg; Bastens, B. et al

in Acta gastro-enterologica Belgica (2011), 74(2), 277-80

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Hepatitis C virus genotype 2 is the third in order of frequency in Belgium. The aim of this study was to better define the genotype 2 carriers' epidemiology characteristics. METHODS ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Hepatitis C virus genotype 2 is the third in order of frequency in Belgium. The aim of this study was to better define the genotype 2 carriers' epidemiology characteristics. METHODS: In a database comprising 1726 viremic hepatitis C virus patient from the south part of Belgium, the files of 98 genotype 2 carriers were reviewed. RESULTS: There was a strong association between genotype 2 and the mode of transmission. The rate of contamination by invasive medical exams was very high (23%), and statistically different from the one of the others genotypes. Eligibility for antiviral therapies and the rate of sustained viral response were high. CONCLUSION: HCV genotype 2 was highly associated with transmission by invasive medical exams. [less ▲]

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See detailRapid improvement of bone metabolism after infliximab treatment in Crohn's disease
Franchimont, N.; Putzeys, V.; Collette, Julien ULg et al

in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (2004), 20(6), 607-614

BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease is associated with low bone mineral density and altered bone metabolism. AIM: To assess the evolution of bone metabolism in Crohn's disease patients treated with infliximab ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease is associated with low bone mineral density and altered bone metabolism. AIM: To assess the evolution of bone metabolism in Crohn's disease patients treated with infliximab. METHODS: We studied 71 Crohn's disease patients treated for the first time with infliximab for refractory Crohn's disease. Biochemical markers of bone formation (type-I procollagen N-terminal propeptide, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin) and of bone resorption (C-telopeptide of type-I collagen) were measured in the serum before and 8 weeks after infliximab therapy and compared with values in a matched healthy control group. RESULTS: Eight weeks after treatment with infliximab, a normalization of bone markers was observed with a median increase in formation markers of 14-51% according to marker and a lower but significant decrease in resorption marker (median 11%). A clinically relevant increase in bone formation markers was present in 30-61% of patients according to the marker. A clinically relevant decrease in C-telopeptide of type-I collagen was present in 38% of patients. No association was found with any tested demographic or clinical parameter. CONCLUSION: Infliximab therapy in Crohn's disease may rapidly influence bone metabolism by acting either on bone formation or bone resorption. This improvement seems to be independent of clinical response to infliximab. [less ▲]

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