References of "Pussemier, Luc"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA review of dietary and non-dietary exposure to bisphenol-A.
Geens, Tinne; Aerts, Dominique; Berthot, Carl et al

in Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association (2012), 50(10), 3725-40

Due to the large number of applications of bisphenol-A (BPA), the human exposure routes are multiple. We aimed to review shortly the food and non-food sources of BPA, and to evaluate their contribution to ... [more ▼]

Due to the large number of applications of bisphenol-A (BPA), the human exposure routes are multiple. We aimed to review shortly the food and non-food sources of BPA, and to evaluate their contribution to the human exposure. Food sources discussed here include epoxy resins, polycarbonate and other applications, such as paperboard and polyvinylchloride materials. Among the non-food sources, exposures through dust, thermal paper, dental materials, and medical devices were summarized. Based on the available data for these exposure sources, it was concluded that the exposure to BPA from non-food sources is generally lower than that from exposure from food by at least one order of magnitude for most studied subgroups. The use of urinary concentrations from biomonitoring studies was evaluated and the back-calculation of BPA intake seems reliable for the overall exposure assessment. In general, the total exposure to BPA is several orders of magnitude lower than the current tolerable daily intake of 50 mug/kg bw/day. Finally, the paper concludes with some critical remarks and recommendations on future human exposure studies to BPA. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPotential Impact of Fertilization Practices on Human Dietary Intake of Dioxins in Belgium
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Elskens, Marc; Focant, Jean-François ULg et al

in Science of the Total Environment (2012), 423

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (21 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of the use of CALUX-results for dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs analysis for quantitative human exposure assessments
Vromman, Valérie; Baert, Katleen; Vanderperren, Huig et al

in Food Control (2012), 27(2), 314-321

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (8 ULg)
Full Text
See detailFood interactions : effects on health, consumer perception and impact on agro-food industries “FOODINTER”.
Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg; Blust, Ronny; Boniver, Delphine et al

Report (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPotential of an in vitro toolbox combined with exposure data as a first step for the risk assessment of dietary chemical contaminants
Ribonnet, Laurence; Van Der Heiden, Edwige ULg; Nobels, Ingrid et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants (2011), 28(9), 1136-1158

In vitro risk assessment of dietary contaminants has become a priority in human food safety. This paper proposes an in vitro approach associating different complementary tools in an original toolbox and ... [more ▼]

In vitro risk assessment of dietary contaminants has become a priority in human food safety. This paper proposes an in vitro approach associating different complementary tools in an original toolbox and aims to improve the assessment of the toxicological impact of dietary contaminants at realistic human exposure levels, with a special focus on the intestinal compartment. The system is based on the use of four complementary cellular tools, namely stress gene induction in transgenic strains of Escherichia coli, modulation of the activity of key biotransformation enzymes (cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 1A1 and 3A4) in a human intestinal cell line, and activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and oestrogenic receptor (ER)-dependent genes in agonistic and antagonistic assays with luciferase reporter cells. It was applied to four chosen model molecules: ochratoxin A (OTA) and deoxynivalenol (DON), two common food-borne mycotoxins, and imazalil (IMA) and benomyl (BEN), two fungicides widely occurring in foodstuffs. All these assays were performed at or around a realistic intestinal concentration, determined through a deterministic approach based on the calculation of a theoretical maximum daily intake (TMDI). Using the four model molecules, it is clearly highlighted that induction of CYP1A1 activity and inhibition of CYP3A4 activity occurred in Caco-2 cells at a realistic intestinal concentration of IMA. Furthermore, some bacterial stress genes were induced in a range of realistic concentrations, following exposure to DON and IMA. In addition, BEN clearly provoked an ER agonistic activity in a human oestrogen sensitive reporter cell line. All these results are in accordance with the literature, suggesting that the in vitro toolbox constitutes an interesting approach in order to obtain a first 'fingerprint' of dietary contaminants at realistic human exposure for further risk assessment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModulation of CYP1A1 activity by a Ginkgo biloba extract in the human intestinal Caco-2 cells
Ribonnet, Laurence; Callebaut, Alfons; Nobels, Ingrid et al

in Toxicology Letters (2011), 202(3), 193-202

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCYP1A1 and CYP3A4 modulation by dietary flavonoids in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.
Sergent, Thérèse; Dupont, Isabelle; Van Der Heiden, Edwige ULg et al

in Toxicology Letters (2009), 191

Flavonoids have been proposed to exert beneficial effects in a multitude of disease states. However, evidence of potential toxic actions has also emerged. Since large doses of flavonoids can be ... [more ▼]

Flavonoids have been proposed to exert beneficial effects in a multitude of disease states. However, evidence of potential toxic actions has also emerged. Since large doses of flavonoids can be encountered in the intestine simultaneously with ingested drugs and pollutants, this study aimed at investigating nine individual flavonoid compounds and their interactions with the major intestinal isoforms of cytochrome P450, i.e. CYPs 1A1 and 3A4, using human intestinal Caco-2 cells cultivated in a serum-free medium. Genistein, quercetin and chrysin provoked a dose-dependent inducing effect on the CYP1A1 activity, measured with the EROD assay. However, they did not affect the CYP1A1 mRNA expression, suggesting they are not aryl hydrocarbon receptor-ligands in intestinal cells and act at a post-transcriptional level. Chrysin, at 50muM, was detected as a potent inhibitor of the TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity, leading the activity to ca. 10% of the TCDD-control value (n=3), this effect involving, at least partly, direct interactions at the enzyme level. Quercetin was also shown to significantly inhibit the constitutive CYP3A4 activity, measured by the 6beta-(OH)-testosterone assay, and to impair its induction by 1,25-vitamin D(3). Chrysin, quercetin and genistein, were detected as significant inhibitors of the 1,25-vitamin D(3)-induced CYP3A4 activity. In vivo, these effects could result in reduced activation of procarcinogens and/or in drug bioavailability limitation. They underline the importance of intestinal studies to assess food safety and health risks linked to the ingestion of flavonoid-enriched supplements or functional foods. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCYP1A1 induction and CYP3A4 inhibition by the fungicide imazalil in the human intestinal Caco-2 cells-Comparison with other conazole pesticides
Sergent, Thérèse; Dupont, Isabelle; Jassogne, Coralie et al

in Toxicology Letters (2009), 184(3), 159-168

Imazalil (IMA) is a widely used imidazole-antifungal pesticide and. therefore. a food contaminant. This compound is also used as a drug (enilconazole). As intestine is the first site of exposure to ... [more ▼]

Imazalil (IMA) is a widely used imidazole-antifungal pesticide and. therefore. a food contaminant. This compound is also used as a drug (enilconazole). As intestine is the first site of exposure to ingested drugs and pollutants, we have investigated the effects of IMA, at realistic intestinal concentrations, on xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and efflux pumps by using Caco-2 cells, as a validated in vitro model of the human intestinal absorptive epithelium. For comparison, other conazole fungicides, i.e. ketoconazole, propiconazole and tebuconazole. were also studied. IMA induced cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 activity to the same extent as benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Cell-free aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) binding assay and reporter gene assay suggested that IMA is not an AhR-ligand, implying that IMA-mediated induction should involve an AhR-independent pathway. Moreover, IMA strongly inhibited the CYP3A4 activity in 1,25-vitamin D-3-induced Caco-2 cells. The other fungicides had weak or nil effects on CYP activities. Study of the apical efflux pump activities revealed that ketoconazole inhibited both P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP-2) or breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), whereas IMA and other fungicides did not. Our results imply that coingestion of IMA-contaminated food and CYP3A4- or CYP1A1-metabolizable drugs or chemicals could lead to drug bioavailability modulation or toxicological interactions, with possible adverse effects for human health. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (24 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnalysis of EU priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in food supplements using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet, diode array or fluorescence detector
Danyi, Sophie ULg; Brose, François ULg; Brasseur, Catherine ULg et al

in Analytica Chimica Acta (2009), 633

High performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet, diode array or fluorescence detector (HPLC/UV-FLD) has been used to set up a method to detect the 15(+1) EU priority polycyclic aromatic ... [more ▼]

High performance liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet, diode array or fluorescence detector (HPLC/UV-FLD) has been used to set up a method to detect the 15(+1) EU priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in food supplements covering the categories of dried plants and plant extracts excluding oily products. A mini validation was performed and the following parameters have been determined: limit of detection, limit of quantification, precision, recovery and linearity. They were in close agreement with quality criteria described in the Commission Regulation (EC) No 333/2007 concerning the PAH benzo[a]pyrene in foodstuffs, except the not fluorescent cyclopenta[c,d]pyrene for which the UV detection leads to a higher limit of detection. Analysis of twenty commercial food supplements covering mainly the class of dried plants was performed to evaluate their PAHs contamination levels and to test the applicability of the method to various plant matrices. Fifty percent of analyzed samples showed concentration exceeding 2 gkg−1 for one or more PAHs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (17 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailModulation of cytochrome P450 1A1 expression and activity in intestinal Caco-2 cells by components of Ginkgo biloba-based dietary supplements
Ribonnet, Laurence; Callebaut, Alfons; Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg et al

in Toxicology Letters (2009), 189

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAssessment of the chemical contamination in home-produced eggs in Belgium: General overview of the CONTEGG study
Van Overmeire, Ilse; Pussemier, Luc; Wageneers, Nadia et al

in Science of the Total Environment (2009), 407(15), 4403-4410

This overview paper describes a study conducted for the Belgian Federal Public Service of Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment during 2006–2007. Home-produced eggs from Belgian private owners of hens ... [more ▼]

This overview paper describes a study conducted for the Belgian Federal Public Service of Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment during 2006–2007. Home-produced eggs from Belgian private owners of hens were included in a large study aiming to determine concentration levels of various environmental contaminants. Bymeans of the analyses of soil samples and of kitchen waste samples, obtained from the same locations, an investigation towards the possible sources of contaminants was possible. Eggs, soils, faeces and kitchen waste samples were checked for the presence of dioxins, PCBs (including dioxin-like PCBs), organochlorine pesticides, trace elements, PAHs, brominated flame retardants and mycotoxins. The study design, sampling methodology and primary conclusions of the study are given. It was found that in some cases dioxin-like compounds were present at levels that are of concern for the health of the egg consumers. Therefore, measures to limit their contamination in eggs, produced by hens of private owners, were proposed and deserve further attentio [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailANALYSIS OF DIOXINS AND DIOXIN-LIKE PCBS IN HOME PRODUCED EGGS: LEVELS AND SOURCES
Van Overmeire, Ilse; Eppe, Gauthier ULg; Waegeneers, Nadia et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailINTAKE OF DIOXINS AND DIOXIN-LIKE PCBs CONSUMING HOME PRODUCED VERSUS COMMERCIAL EGGS
Sioen, Isabelle; Bilau, Maaike; Van Overmeire, Ilse et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailImazalil modulates CYPs 1A1 and 3A4 activities in the human Caco-2 cells as an intestinal model to assess food safety
Sergent, Thérèse; Ribonnet, Laurence; Jassogne, C. et al

in Toxicology Letters (2007), 172

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSet up of an experimental tool in order to investigate food chemical contaminant toxicity at realistic concentrations
Ribonnet, Laurence; Sergent, Thérèse; Nobels, Ingrid et al

in Toxicology Letters (2007), 172

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOn-farm contamination of animals with chemical contaminants
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Pussemier, Luc; Huyghebaert, André et al

in Revue Scientifique et Technique (International Office of Epizootics) (2006), 25(2), 655-673

Food products should not contain unsafe levels of chemical contaminants. However, it is not possible to monitor each and every one of the many thousands of chemicals that are used in our advanced ... [more ▼]

Food products should not contain unsafe levels of chemical contaminants. However, it is not possible to monitor each and every one of the many thousands of chemicals that are used in our advanced societies. Chemical contaminants in foodstuffs of animal origin may be classified into three categories: natural contaminants (e.g. mycotoxins), environmental contaminants linked to industrialisation and/or urbanisation (e.g. dioxins and dioxin-like compounds) and authorised chemical products (e.g. residues of veterinary medical products). Chemical hazards may contaminate foodstuffs of animal origin all the way from farm to fork. Contamination may occur in any of the different production systems, and it is difficult to make comparisons between production systems (e.g. extensive versus intensive farming systems) with regard to food safety. Even when we take into account the latest analytical methods, which can detect ever-smaller quantities of residues, the relative importance of chemical contaminants seems to have declined during recent decades due to improvements in information and prevention. Nonetheless, individual incidents can never be ruled out and may have serious economic, health or social repercussions. Particular attention must be paid to chemical hazards, in order to reduce as much as possible the risks to livestock and to the consumer. Continued monitoring and periodic reassessment of risks posed by these contaminants (at the national level) are needed to detect or anticipate new problems, so that appropriate actions can be taken in the interest of public health. More attention should be paid to the production of detailed information, especially with regard to background data (e.g. the objectives of the monitoring, sampling methods, chemicals to be analysed, analytical methods, detection limits, raw data and specified units), in order to obtain a better basis for risk assessment. Such risk assessment provides control authorities with an effective tool for the exchange of information and measures to be taken to ensure food safety. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (5 ULg)