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See detailEffect of high temperature during embryogenesis on the sex differentiation process in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.
Rougeot, Carole ULg; Prignon, Christian ULg; Ngouana Kengne, Cyrille Valence et al

in Aquaculture (2008), 276

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See detailEarly sex reversal during the embryonic development in the Nile tilapia
Rougeot, Carole ULg; Kanfitine, Samane, Yadja; Prignon, Christian ULg et al

in Cybium (2008), 32(2), 104-105

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See detailEffect of sexual genotype on the reproductive biology of the Nile tilapia, O.niloticus.
Rougeot, Carole ULg; Badiane, A. A.; Prignon, Christian ULg et al

Poster (2007, June)

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See detailInduce triploidy by heat shock in Eurasian perch, Perca fluviatilis
Rougeot, Carole ULg; Minet, Laurent; Prignon, Christian ULg et al

in Aquatic Living Resources (2003), 16(2, MAR-APR), 90-94

In Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis), females grow significantly faster than males. Moreover, gonadal development has a significant negative impact on somatic growth and fillet yield. In order to induce ... [more ▼]

In Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis), females grow significantly faster than males. Moreover, gonadal development has a significant negative impact on somatic growth and fillet yield. In order to induce sterility, triploidy induction was attempted by subjecting fertilised eggs to heat shocks. Different combinations of temperature (28, 30, 34, 35 and 36 degreesC), duration (2, 5, 10 and 25 min) and time of shock initiation (TI = 3, 5 and 7 min post-fertilisation) were tested. Flow cytometry analysis was used to assess ploidy level of control and heat-shocked larvae. Low intensity (28-30 degreesC) and long duration (10 and 25 min) shocks lead to significantly higher survival (44 +/- 26%) and triploidisation (71 +/- 26%) rates than high intensity (34-36 degreesC) and short duration (2 and 5 min) shocks (17 +/- 19% and 21 +/- 26%, respectively). The most effective conditions for efficient triploidy induction were low intensity shock of 30 degreesC, applied 5 min post-fertilisation for 25 min. This treatment led to the production of all-triploid populations (100%) with up to 43% survival rate. (C) 2003 Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS and Ifremer/IRD/Inra/Cemagref. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailOntogenetic variations of thermal optimum for growth, and its implication on thermolabile sex determination in blue tilapia
Baras, E.; Mpo'n'tcha, A.; Driouch, H. et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2002), 61(3), 645-660

Knowledge of how the optimum temperature for growth (Tdegrees(opt)) varies during ontogeny, and how close it is to the temperatures that induce Phenotypic masculinization is fundamental to the ... [more ▼]

Knowledge of how the optimum temperature for growth (Tdegrees(opt)) varies during ontogeny, and how close it is to the temperatures that induce Phenotypic masculinization is fundamental to the understanding of the evolution of thermolabile sex determinism (TSD) in fishes. In blue tilapia Oreochromis aureus, Tdegrees(opt) is 32.6degrees C at the start of exogenous feeding (10 mg fish) and it decreases by c 1degrees C each time that the fish bode mass increases by an order of magnitude. Temperatures <35degrees C are not sufficient to induce complete phenotypic masculinization. Based on a multiple-regression model (r(2)=0.938) plotting growth against body mass and water temperature. genotypically female tilapia living at high temperatures during the thermosensitive period (21-28 days) and being reversed into phenotypic males should incur an initial growth disadvantage over fish living at Tdegrees(opt) but not over those living at slightly colder temperatures (27-29degrees C). This initial disadvantage would be later compensated for by faster growth because of between-sex growth dimorphism to the detriment of phenotypic females. These arguments suggest that there is no definite pressure against the selection of TSD in blue tilapia and probable other Oreochromis spp. (C) 2002 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenotypic sex reversal of blue tilapia under constant and fluctuating thermal regimes, and its adaptive and evolutionary implications
Baras, E.; Prignon, Christian ULg; Gohoungo, G. et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2000), 192

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (5 ULg)