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See detailL'élevage du hotu en Wallonie
Gennotte, Vincent ULg; Prignon, Christian ULg

Book published by Les Presses Agronomiques de Gembloux (2016)

Ce document décrit les techniques d’élevage du hotu, parcourant la reproduction, l’élevage larvaire et le grossissement des juvéniles, dans différentes conditions de production. Il constitue la synthèse ... [more ▼]

Ce document décrit les techniques d’élevage du hotu, parcourant la reproduction, l’élevage larvaire et le grossissement des juvéniles, dans différentes conditions de production. Il constitue la synthèse des résultats d’un programme de recherche mené par le Centre de Formation et de Recherche en Aquaculture (CEFRA, Université de Liège), et financé par le Service Public de Wallonie et le Fonds Européen pour la Pêche, visant à développer les techniques d’élevage de cette espèce dans le cadre d’un programme plus vaste de restauration des populations piscicoles patrimoniales de Wallonie. Ces résultats ont été complétés par les connaissances issues de recherches antérieures pour constituer un guide technique le plus complet possible, destiné au pisciculteur intéressé par la production de nouvelles espèces. [less ▲]

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See detailL'élevage du barbeau en Wallonie
Gennotte, Vincent ULg; Prignon, Christian ULg

Book published by Les Presses Agronomiques de Gembloux (2016)

Ce document décrit les techniques d’élevage du barbeau, parcourant la reproduction, l’élevage larvaire et le grossissement des juvéniles, dans différentes conditions de production. Il constitue la ... [more ▼]

Ce document décrit les techniques d’élevage du barbeau, parcourant la reproduction, l’élevage larvaire et le grossissement des juvéniles, dans différentes conditions de production. Il constitue la synthèse des résultats d’un programme de recherche mené par le Centre de Formation et de Recherche en Aquaculture (CEFRA, Université de Liège), et financé par le Service Public de Wallonie et le Fonds Européen pour la Pêche, visant à développer les techniques d’élevage de cette espèce dans le cadre d’un programme plus vaste de restauration des populations piscicoles patrimoniales de Wallonie. Ces résultats ont été complétés par les connaissances issues de recherches antérieures pour constituer un guide technique le plus complet possible, destiné au pisciculteur intéressé par la production de nouvelles espèces. [less ▲]

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See detailEtude de la diversité génétique et de l’état des stocks des populations de barbeaux et de hotus en Wallonie. Amélioration des techniques d’élevage en vue de repeuplements raisonnés et de transferts de connaissances vers les pisciculteurs
Gennotte, Vincent ULg; Prignon, Christian ULg; Dierckx, Arnaud ULg et al

Report (2015)

Nase (Chondrostoma nasus) and common barbel (Barbus barbus) are two rheophilic cyprinid fish naturally present in South Belgian rivers. During the last decades, the construction of dams together with ... [more ▼]

Nase (Chondrostoma nasus) and common barbel (Barbus barbus) are two rheophilic cyprinid fish naturally present in South Belgian rivers. During the last decades, the construction of dams together with changes in hydrological regimes, modifications of riverbed morphology and water pollution caused some local dramatic declines in their populations. However, recent improvements in terms of water quality and habitat fragmentation allow now to implement a rational restocking plan of locally endangered patrimonial fish species such as nase and common barbel. To reach this goal, this project (co-funded by the European Fisheries Fund and the Wallonia Public Service) proposed to develop five complementary parts with specific objectives: • Review of the knowledge on nase and barbel geographical distribution and stock health in Wallonia. This section presents the distribution and recent evolution of populations in Europe, and more specifically in Wallonia. Areas where population declines were reported are identified. Even if a weak population expansion was reported in some isolated cases, the global status of Walloon populations is still concerning. • Characterization of genetic structure and diversity of South Belgium populations. Restocking operations for a conservation purpose have to be based on the knowledge and the use of wild type genetic strains. Nase and barbel populations from South Belgium were genetically characterized by use of microsatellites. Globally, nase and barbel populations are structured on a basin scale. A slight genetic differentiation exists between populations from the Rhine basin and the Meuse basin, defining two conservation units, but no finer structure was observed among populations from the Meuse basin. Genetic variation was high within populations. Genetic structure of barbel populations is more complex due to past restocking operations with different genetic lineages. An analysis of mDNA identified 6 different haplotypes but was unable to categorize them as autochtone or allochtone. • Development of fish production techniques. The complete control of fish farming is necessary to produce high quality juveniles for restocking. All the steps of the production cycle were addressed: broodstock management and reproduction, egg incubation, larval rearing and grow-out. Production systems ranging from extensive pond culture to intensive RAS were tested and the optimal farming conditions were identified (temperature, density, feeding, tank volumes, …). • Adaptation assessment of farmed fingerlings to natural conditions. Growth and survival performances of captive farmed fish were assessed in an experimental environment that mimics natural conditions. The results suggested that the more efficient practice for restocking would be based on operations performed in spring with large juveniles (3 to 50 g). • Know-how diffusion toward fish farmers. All the breeding and grow-out techniques developed for nase and barbel production are the subject of two handbooks. These documents, attached to the report, will be published and distributed to fish producers. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic structure of nase, Chondrostoma nasus, and common barbel, Barbus barbus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) populations in South Belgium rivers: toward a rational management of conservation restocking
Gennotte, Vincent ULg; Michaux, Johan ULg; Prignon, Christian ULg et al

Poster (2014, December)

Nase (Chondrostoma nasus) and common barbel (Barbus barbus) are two rheophilic cyprinid fish naturally present in the Belgian Meuse and Rhine basins. During the last decades, the construction of dams ... [more ▼]

Nase (Chondrostoma nasus) and common barbel (Barbus barbus) are two rheophilic cyprinid fish naturally present in the Belgian Meuse and Rhine basins. During the last decades, the construction of dams together with changes in hydrological regimes, modifications of riverbed morphology and water pollution have caused some local dramatic declines in their populations. However, recent improvements in terms of water quality and habitat fragmentation allow considering as realistic a rational restocking plan of locally endangered patrimonial fish species such as nase and common barbel. Restocking operations for a conservation purpose have to be based on the knowledge and the use of wild type genetic strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize the genetic structure and diversity of nase and common barbel populations in South Belgium rivers. Wild common barbels (n = 313) and nases (n = 271) were sampled by electrofishing in respectively 10 and 6 different tributaries from the Meuse and Rhine rivers. Genotyping was performed on 24 microsatellite markers for each species. Preliminary results showed, for both species, a differential genetic clustering between fish originating from the Meuse basin and those originating from the Rhine basin. Detailed analysis describing the genetic structure and diversity of South Belgium populations will be presented and will serve as a management tool to set up a breeding plan for conservation restocking. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of high temperature during embryogenesis on the sex differentiation process in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.
Rougeot, Carole ULg; Prignon, Christian ULg; Ngouana Kengne, Cyrille Valence et al

in Aquaculture (2008), 276

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See detailEarly sex reversal during the embryonic development in the Nile tilapia
Rougeot, Carole ULg; Kanfitine, Samane, Yadja; Prignon, Christian ULg et al

in Cybium (2008), 32(2), 104-105

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See detailEffect of sexual genotype on the reproductive biology of the Nile tilapia, O.niloticus.
Rougeot, Carole ULg; Badiane, A. A.; Prignon, Christian ULg et al

Poster (2007, June)

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See detailInduce triploidy by heat shock in Eurasian perch, Perca fluviatilis
Rougeot, Carole ULg; Minet, Laurent; Prignon, Christian ULg et al

in Aquatic Living Resources (2003), 16(2, MAR-APR), 90-94

In Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis), females grow significantly faster than males. Moreover, gonadal development has a significant negative impact on somatic growth and fillet yield. In order to induce ... [more ▼]

In Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis), females grow significantly faster than males. Moreover, gonadal development has a significant negative impact on somatic growth and fillet yield. In order to induce sterility, triploidy induction was attempted by subjecting fertilised eggs to heat shocks. Different combinations of temperature (28, 30, 34, 35 and 36 degreesC), duration (2, 5, 10 and 25 min) and time of shock initiation (TI = 3, 5 and 7 min post-fertilisation) were tested. Flow cytometry analysis was used to assess ploidy level of control and heat-shocked larvae. Low intensity (28-30 degreesC) and long duration (10 and 25 min) shocks lead to significantly higher survival (44 +/- 26%) and triploidisation (71 +/- 26%) rates than high intensity (34-36 degreesC) and short duration (2 and 5 min) shocks (17 +/- 19% and 21 +/- 26%, respectively). The most effective conditions for efficient triploidy induction were low intensity shock of 30 degreesC, applied 5 min post-fertilisation for 25 min. This treatment led to the production of all-triploid populations (100%) with up to 43% survival rate. (C) 2003 Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS and Ifremer/IRD/Inra/Cemagref. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailOntogenetic variations of thermal optimum for growth, and its implication on thermolabile sex determination in blue tilapia
Baras, E.; Mpo'n'tcha, A.; Driouch, H. et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2002), 61(3), 645-660

Knowledge of how the optimum temperature for growth (Tdegrees(opt)) varies during ontogeny, and how close it is to the temperatures that induce Phenotypic masculinization is fundamental to the ... [more ▼]

Knowledge of how the optimum temperature for growth (Tdegrees(opt)) varies during ontogeny, and how close it is to the temperatures that induce Phenotypic masculinization is fundamental to the understanding of the evolution of thermolabile sex determinism (TSD) in fishes. In blue tilapia Oreochromis aureus, Tdegrees(opt) is 32.6degrees C at the start of exogenous feeding (10 mg fish) and it decreases by c 1degrees C each time that the fish bode mass increases by an order of magnitude. Temperatures <35degrees C are not sufficient to induce complete phenotypic masculinization. Based on a multiple-regression model (r(2)=0.938) plotting growth against body mass and water temperature. genotypically female tilapia living at high temperatures during the thermosensitive period (21-28 days) and being reversed into phenotypic males should incur an initial growth disadvantage over fish living at Tdegrees(opt) but not over those living at slightly colder temperatures (27-29degrees C). This initial disadvantage would be later compensated for by faster growth because of between-sex growth dimorphism to the detriment of phenotypic females. These arguments suggest that there is no definite pressure against the selection of TSD in blue tilapia and probable other Oreochromis spp. (C) 2002 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenotypic sex reversal of blue tilapia under constant and fluctuating thermal regimes, and its adaptive and evolutionary implications
Baras, E.; Prignon, Christian ULg; Gohoungo, G. et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2000), 192

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (5 ULg)