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See detailThe XMM-LSS catalogue: X-ray sources and associated multiwavelength data. Version II
Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Pacaud, F. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2013), 429

We present the final release of the multi-wavelength XMM-LSS data set,covering the full survey area of 11.1 square degrees, with X-ray data processed with the latest XMM-LSS pipeline version. The present ... [more ▼]

We present the final release of the multi-wavelength XMM-LSS data set,covering the full survey area of 11.1 square degrees, with X-ray data processed with the latest XMM-LSS pipeline version. The present publication supersedes the Pierre et al.(2007) catalogue pertaining to the initial 5 square degrees. We provide X-ray source lists in the customary energy bands (0.5-2 and 2-10 keV) for a total of 6721 objects in the deep full-exposure catalogue and 5572 in the 10ks-limited one, above a detection likelihood of 15 in at least one band. We also provide a multiwavelength catalogue, cross-correlating our list with IR, NIR, optical and UV catalogues. Customary data products (X-ray FITS images, CFHTLS and SWIRE thumbnail images) are made available together with our interactively queriable database in Milan, while a static snapshot of the catalogues will be supplied to CDS, as soon as final acceptance is completed. [less ▲]

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See detailXMM-LSS survey: AGN classifications (Garcet+, 2007)
Garcet, O.; Gandhi, P.; Gosset, Eric ULg et al

Textual, factual or bibliographical database (2007)

We have used the most up-to-date X-ray catalog (Pierre et al., 2007, Cat. J/MNRAS/382/279) to define a sample of 612 X-ray selected point-like sources which have both a log-likelihood of detection >20 ... [more ▼]

We have used the most up-to-date X-ray catalog (Pierre et al., 2007, Cat. J/MNRAS/382/279) to define a sample of 612 X-ray selected point-like sources which have both a log-likelihood of detection >20 (this roughly corresponds to >3{sigma}) in the [2-10]keV band (see Pacaud et al., 2006MNRAS.372..578P, for full details), and a total number of counts >80 in the [0.5-10]keV band. (1 data file). [less ▲]

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See detail3{sigma} hard sample of XMDS survey (Tajer+, 2007)
Tajer, M.; Polletta, M.; Chiappetti, L. et al

Textual, factual or bibliographical database (2007)

Our goal is to probe the populations of obscured and unobscured AGN investigating their optical-IR and X-ray properties as a function of X-ray flux, luminosity and redshift within a hard X-ray selected ... [more ▼]

Our goal is to probe the populations of obscured and unobscured AGN investigating their optical-IR and X-ray properties as a function of X-ray flux, luminosity and redshift within a hard X-ray selected sample with wide multiwavelength coverage. We selected a sample of 136 X-ray sources detected at a significance of >=3{sigma} in the 2-10keV band (F[SUB]2-10[/SUB]>~10[SUP]-14[/SUP]erg/cm[SUP]2[/SUP]/s) in a ~1deg[SUP]2[/SUP] area in the XMM Medium Deep Survey (XMDS, Cat. ). The XMDS area is covered with optical photometry from the VVDS and CFHTLS surveys and infrared Spitzer data from the SWIRE survey. Based on the X-ray luminosity and X-ray to optical ratio, 132 sources are likely AGN, of which 122 have unambiguous optical - IR identification. The observed optical and IR spectral energy distributions of all identified sources are fitted with AGN/galaxy templates in order to classify them and compute photometric redshifts. X-ray spectral analysis is performed individually for sources with a sufficient number of counts and using a stacking technique for subsamples of sources at different flux levels. Hardness ratios are used to estimate X-ray absorption in individual weak sources. (1 data file). [less ▲]

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See detailObscured and unobscured AGN populations in a hard-X-ray selected sample of the XMDS survey
Tajer, M.; Polletta, M.; Chiappetti, L. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2007), 467(1), 73-91

Aims. Our goal is to probe the populations of obscured and unobscured AGN investigating their optical-IR and X-ray properties as a function of X-ray flux, luminosity and redshift within a hard X-ray ... [more ▼]

Aims. Our goal is to probe the populations of obscured and unobscured AGN investigating their optical-IR and X-ray properties as a function of X-ray flux, luminosity and redshift within a hard X-ray selected sample with wide multiwavelength coverage. Methods. We selected a sample of 136 X-ray sources detected at a significance of >= 3 sigma in the 2-10 keV band (F2-10 greater than or similar to 10(-1)4 erg cm(-2) s(-1)) in a similar to 1 deg(2) area in the XMM Medium Deep Survey (XMDS). The XMDS area is covered with optical photometry from the VVDS and CFHTLS surveys and infrared Spitzer data from the SWIRE survey. Based on the X-ray luminosity and X-ray to optical ratio, 132 sources are likely AGN, of which 122 have unambiguous optical - IR identification. The observed optical and IR spectral energy distributions of all identified sources are fitted with AGN/galaxy templates in order to classify them and compute photometric redshifts. X-ray spectral analysis is performed individually for sources with a sufficient number of counts and using a stacking technique for subsamples of sources at different flux levels. Hardness ratios are used to estimate X-ray absorption in individual weak sources. Results. 70% of the AGN are fitted by a type 2 AGN or a star forming galaxy template. We group them together in a single class of "optically obscured" AGN. These have "red" optical colors and in about 60% of cases show significant X-ray absorption (N-H > 10(22) cm(-2)). Sources with SEDs typical of type 1 AGN have "blue" optical colors and exhibit X-ray absorption in about 30% of cases. The stacked X-ray spectrum of obscured AGN is flatter than that of type 1 AGN and has an average spectral slope of Gamma = 1.6. The subsample of objects fitted by a star forming galaxy template has an even harder stacked spectrum, with Gamma similar to 1.2-1.3. The obscured fraction is larger at lower fluxes, lower redshifts and lower luminosities. X-ray absorption is less common than "optical" obscuration and its incidence is nearly constant with redshift and luminosity. This implies that at high luminosities X-ray absorption is not necessarily related to optical obscuration. The estimated surface densities of obscured, unobscured AGN and type 2 QSOs are respectively 138, 59 and 35 deg(-2) at F > 10-14 erg cm(-2) s(-1). [less ▲]

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See detailSpectral Energy Distributions of Hard X-Ray Selected Active Galactic Nuclei in the XMM-Newton Medium Deep Survey
Polletta, M.; Tajer, M.; Maraschi, L. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2007), 663

We present the SEDs of a hard X-ray selected sample containing 136 sources with F[SUB]2-10keV[/SUB]>10[SUP]-14[/SUP] erg cm[SUP]-2[/SUP] s[SUP]-1[/SUP] 132 are AGNs. The sources are detected in a 1 deg ... [more ▼]

We present the SEDs of a hard X-ray selected sample containing 136 sources with F[SUB]2-10keV[/SUB]>10[SUP]-14[/SUP] erg cm[SUP]-2[/SUP] s[SUP]-1[/SUP] 132 are AGNs. The sources are detected in a 1 deg[SUP]2[/SUP] area of the XMM-Newton Medium Deep Survey where optical data from the VVDS and CFHTLS and infrared data from the SWIRE survey are available. Based on a SED fitting technique we derive photometric redshifts with sigma(1+z)=0.11 and 6% of outliers and identify AGN signatures in 83% of the objects. This fraction is higher than derived when a spectroscopic classification is available. The remaining 17[SUP]+9[/SUP][SUB]-6[/SUB]% of AGNs show star-forming galaxy SEDs (SF class). The sources with AGN signatures are divided in two classes, AGN1 (33[SUP]+6[/SUP][SUB]-1[/SUB]%) and AGN2 (50[SUP]+6[/SUP][SUB]-11[/SUB]%). The AGN1 and AGN2 classes include sources whose SEDs are fitted by type 1 and type 2 AGN templates, respectively. On average, AGN1s show soft X-ray spectra, consistent with being unabsorbed, while AGN2s and SFs show hard X-ray spectra, consistent with being absorbed. The analysis of the average SEDs as a function of X-ray luminosity shows a reddening of the infrared SEDs, consistent with a decreasing contribution from the host galaxy at higher luminosities. The AGNs in the SF classes are likely obscured in the mid-infrared, as suggested by their low L[SUB]3-20mum[/SUB]/L[SUP]corr[/SUP][SUB]0.5-10keV[/SUB] ratios. We confirm the previously found correlation for AGNs between the radio luminosity and the X-ray and the mid-infrared luminosities. The X-ray-radio correlation can be used to identify heavily absorbed AGNs. However, the estimated radio fluxes for the missing AGN population responsible for the bulk of the background at E>10 keV are too faint to be detected even in the deepest current radio surveys. [less ▲]

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See detailThe XMM large scale structure survey: optical vs. X-ray classifications of active galactic nuclei and the unified scheme
Garcet, Olivier ULg; Gandhi, P.; Gosset, Eric ULg et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2007), 474

Aims.Our goal is to characterize AGN populations by comparing their X-ray and optical classifications within the framework of the standard orientation-based unified scheme. Methods: We present a sample of ... [more ▼]

Aims.Our goal is to characterize AGN populations by comparing their X-ray and optical classifications within the framework of the standard orientation-based unified scheme. Methods: We present a sample of 99 spectroscopically identified (R <= 22 mag) X-ray selected point sources in the XMM-LSS survey which are significantly detected (>=3sigma) in the [ 2-10] keV band with fluxes between 8 × 10[SUP]-15[/SUP] and 8 × 10[SUP]-14[/SUP] erg s[SUP]-1[/SUP] cm[SUP]-2[/SUP], and which have more than 80 counts. We have compared their X-ray and optical classifications. To this end, we performed an X-ray spectral analysis for all of these 99 X-ray sources in order to assess whether they are intrinsically absorbed or not. The X-ray classification is based on the measured intrinsic column density. The optical classification is based on the measured FWHM of the permitted emission lines, the absence of broad lines being due to obscuration within the framework of the standard AGN unified scheme. Results: Introducing the fourfold point correlation coefficient r, we find a mild correlation between the X-ray and the optical classifications (r = 0.28), as up to 32 X-ray sources out of 99 have differing X-ray and optical classifications: on one hand, 10% of the type 1 sources (7/32) present broad emission lines in their optical spectra and strong absorption (N{H}[SUP]int[/SUP] >= 10[SUP]22[/SUP] cm[SUP]-2[/SUP]) in the X-rays. These objects are highly luminous AGN lying at high redshift and thus dilution effects by the host galaxy light are totally ruled out, their discrepant nature being an intrinsic property instead. Their X-ray luminosities and redshifts distributions are consistent with those of the unabsorbed X-ray sources with broad emission lines (L{2-10} 4 × 10[SUP]44[/SUP] erg s[SUP]-1[/SUP]; z 1.9). On the other hand, 25/32 are moderate luminosity (L{2-10} <= 5 × 10[SUP]43[/SUP] erg s[SUP]-1[/SUP]) AGN, which are both unabsorbed in the X-rays and only present narrow emission lines in their optical spectra. Based on their line ratios in the optical, the majority of them have an optical spectrum which is more representative of the host galaxy rather than of a reddened AGN. We finally infer that dilution of the AGN by the host galaxy seems to account for their nature. 5/25 have been defined as Seyfert 2 based on their optical spectra. In conclusion, most of these 32 discrepant cases can be accounted for by the standard AGN unified scheme, as its predictions are not met for only 12% of the 99 X-ray sources. Table 4 and Figs. [see full text]-[see full text] are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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