References of "Polis, Stéphane"
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See detailRamses. An Annotated Corpus of Late Egyptian
Winand, Jean ULg; Polis, Stéphane ULg; Rosmorduc, Serge

in Kousoulis, P. (Ed.) Proceedings of the Xth IAE Congress (Rhodos, 2008) (in press)

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See detailThe scribal repertoire of Amennakhte son of Ipuy: Describing variation across Late Egyptian registers
Polis, Stéphane ULg

in Cromwell, Jennifer; Grossman, Eitan (Eds.) Beyond Free Variation: Scribal Repertoires from Old Kingdom to Early Islamic Egypt (in press)

The aim of this chapter is to investigate diaphasic variation in the texts written by the Deir el-Medina scribe Amennakhte son of Ipuy in New Kingdom Egypt (ca. 1150 BCE) by analysing the graphemic and ... [more ▼]

The aim of this chapter is to investigate diaphasic variation in the texts written by the Deir el-Medina scribe Amennakhte son of Ipuy in New Kingdom Egypt (ca. 1150 BCE) by analysing the graphemic and linguistic features of the registers used by this individual when writing texts belonging to different genres. The registers are conceived here as selections operating within the scribal repertoire. At an empirical level, this study is intended as a first step towards a comprehensive description of the types of linguistic variation found within the written production of the Deir el-Medina community in New Kingdom Egypt (ca. 1500–1050 BCE). At a more methodological level, as a case study testing the applicability of some historical sociolinguistic methods in the field of Ancient Egyptian, which could ultimately result in refining our approach to its diachrony. [less ▲]

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See detailLinguistic variation in Ancient Egyptian. An introduction to the state of the art (with special attention to the community of Deir el-Medina)
Polis, Stéphane ULg

in Cromwell, Jennifer; Grossman, Eitan (Eds.) Beyond Free Variation: Scribal Repertoires from Old Kingdom to Early Islamic Egypt (in press)

In this chapter, I explore different aspects of the variability ‘inherent to human languages’ as it manifests itself in the corpus of pre-Demotic texts from Ancient Egypt. More specifically, I adopt a ... [more ▼]

In this chapter, I explore different aspects of the variability ‘inherent to human languages’ as it manifests itself in the corpus of pre-Demotic texts from Ancient Egypt. More specifically, I adopt a sociolinguistic perspective and describe the types of impact that extra-linguistic factors have had on the written performance in this specific socio-cultural setting. [less ▲]

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See detailCoptic kata vs Greek κατά: Contrastive semantics of structural borrowings and semantic maps
Polis, Stéphane ULg; Stasse, Bauduin ULg

in Dils, Peter; Grossman, Eitan; Richter, Tonio Sebastian (Eds.) et al Language contact and bilingualism in antiquity: What linguistic borrowing into Coptic can tell us about (in press)

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See detailMethIS V. La valeur de la science. Pourquoi évaluer la recherche
Cormann, Grégory ULg; Dozo, Björn-Olav ULg; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Book published by Presses universitaires de Liège (in press)

Actes du colloque du 10 et 11 décembre 2009 qui s'est tenu à Liège à l'initiative du personnel scientifique

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See detailLa modalité en néo-égyptien
Polis, Stéphane ULg

Book published by Brill (in press)

Cette monographie est issue de ma thèse de doctorat qui constituait la première étude globale de la modalité en néo-égyptien. Le chapitre introductif [§1] est consacré à la définition du corpus néo ... [more ▼]

Cette monographie est issue de ma thèse de doctorat qui constituait la première étude globale de la modalité en néo-égyptien. Le chapitre introductif [§1] est consacré à la définition du corpus néo-égyptien et intègre une discussion des différentes formes de variation (diachronique, diatopique, diaphasique et diastratique) au sein du corpus néo-égyptien. Cet effort définitoire conforte l’assise empirique de l’étude : la ventilation du corpus en fonction de critères chronologiques et géographiques, de la nature du support et des genres littéraires permet d’objectiver les analyses proposées pour chaque expression de la modalité. Le corps du travail se divise en trois parties consacrées, respectivement, [§2] à une définition générale de la notion de modalité (devant permettre de déterminer les media expressifs qui relèvent de son étude en néo-égyptien) ainsi qu’à l’établissement d’un modèle sémantique de cette notion qui réponde aux impératifs d’économie ainsi que de cohérence et qui rende justice aux données typologiques ; [§3] à l’étude des modalités radicales (i.e. les modalités déontiques et bouliques), en envisageant les relations qu’elles entretiennent avec le domaine axiologique ; [§4] à l’examen des modalités assertives ([§4.a] analyse des formes de complémentation, en ce compris les liens entre intégration syntaxique, variation de l’assertivité et degrés de manipulation ; [§4.b] étude de l’impact des auxiliaires d’énonciation sur le degré d’assertivité d’une proposition ; [§4.c] critique des théories existantes concernant les moyens expressifs du discours indirect en néo-égyptien). Les conclusions [§5] sont accompagnées de propositions prospectives devant permettre [§5.a] de rendre le modèle défendu applicable pour l’étude des complexes conditionnels, [§5.b] d’intégrer la dimension énonciative dans l’analyse des relations interpersonnelles, [§5.c] de décrire adéquatement les expressions de la causalité et de la finalité. [less ▲]

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See detailStructuring the lexicon
Polis, Stéphane ULg; Winand, Jean ULg

in Kousoulis, P. (Ed.) Proceedings of the Xth IAE Congress (Rhodos, 2008) (in press)

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See detailRamses goes Online. An annotated corpus of Late Egyptian texts in interaction with the Egyptological community
Polis, Stéphane ULg; Rosmorduc, Serge; Winand, Jean ULg

Conference (2015, August 27)

The Ramses project was first introduced to Egyptologists in 2008, during the 10th interna-tional congress of Egyptologists held in Rhodes (Winand et al. in press). After eight years of IT developments ... [more ▼]

The Ramses project was first introduced to Egyptologists in 2008, during the 10th interna-tional congress of Egyptologists held in Rhodes (Winand et al. in press). After eight years of IT developments (under the responsibility of S. Rosmorduc) and of annotation of Late Egyptian texts (Polis et al. 2013; Polis & Winand 2013), the data can now progressively be made available online. After an introduction providing general information about the annotated corpus (510 000+ tokens; 65 000+ hieroglyphic spellings; 10 000+ lemmata; 4000+ texts), this paper will focus on three main aspects: 1. Description of the functionalities of the annotating tool (the TextEditor), with a special attention to the metadata that are used for describing the documents and texts that are integrated in the corpus. This section will include proposals regarding the creation of shared thesauri for describing (written) Egyptian material. 2. Discussion of the solution that has been designed for handling the evolution of the database (see already Rosmorduc 2013), both as regards its content — namely, any change that affects texts, lemmata, inflexions, spellings, etc. — and its structure — types and structure of the metadata, evolution of the texts representation format, etc. In a nutshell, the new database will use the technique of event sourcing, where the database is seen as a sequence of editing events, which allows both “time travel” in the database history, and easy fix of editing mistakes. 3. Presentation of the first Online version of Ramses. Several corpora of Late Egyptian texts (the so-called Tomb Robberies, the Late Egyptian Stories, the Late Ramesside letters and a selection of ostraca from Deir el-Medineh) will be made available for the first time at the occasion the 11th International Congress in Florence. The website will of course allow users to browse the annotated texts and lexemes, and to make simple or complex queries. Besides, we will also encourage Egyptologists to interact directly with the data, e.g., by flagging inaccuracies or signaling alternative analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailA shared repository of hieroglyphic signs: The Thot sign-list
Polis, Stéphane ULg; Rosmorduc, Serge

Conference (2015, August 27)

The principles to be taken into consideration for building a hieroglyphic sign list have been discussed for quite some time (Schenkel 1977), and recently received renewed and additional attention (Meeks ... [more ▼]

The principles to be taken into consideration for building a hieroglyphic sign list have been discussed for quite some time (Schenkel 1977), and recently received renewed and additional attention (Meeks 2013, Polis & Rosmorduc 2013). The catalogs of hieroglyphic signs (e.g. Buurman et al. 1988, Grimal et al. 1993), however, did not implement these principles, since their goal was rather to allow for the encoding and rendering (either on paper or on screen) of as many hieroglyphs as possible. As a result, hieroglyphic text editors (Gozzoli 2013) will usually do the trick when one aims at displaying hieroglyphic texts, but in its current state, the Manuel de Codage makes the creation of annotated corpora that include hieroglyphs problematic (Nederhof 2013). In this paper, we do not focus on issues pertaining to the relative positioning of hieroglyphs (Nederhof 2002), but on another — more essential — problem, namely the hieroglyphic sign-list itself. Existing sign-lists suffer from the fact that they are (1) unstructured, (2) unreferenced, and (3) non-described. Based on our experience with respect to the encoding of hieroglyphic spellings in the Ramses corpus (Polis et al. 2013; Polis & Winand 2013), we present a beta version of the Thot sign-list, which has the following features (see the discussion in Polis & Rosmorduc 2013): 1. The sign-list is structured: each hieroglyph of the sign-list belongs to one of the three following categories: grapheme, class and shape (from the more abstract to the more concrete, see also Meeks 2013). 2. Signs are referenced: each sign is accompanied by at least one reference to a publication in which the hieroglyph is used in context. For this purpose, the unpublished lists of hieroglyphic signs compiled by Hornung and Schenkel have been instrumental. We are much grateful to both of them for sharing this material with us and allowing us to use it in this context. 3. Signs are described at two levels: a. The functions that each hieroglyph can fulfill (Polis & Rosmorduc in press), with illustrative examples for each function. b. The salient iconic features of each hieroglyph, based on a controlled vocabulary. Practically, the Thot sign-list is a Wiki, i.e., a web application that allows collaborative modification of its content and structure. Thanks to the Semantic Mediawiki extension, one can create links between any signs sharing a given property. The goal is obviously to allow any Egyptologist to enrich the structured sign-list Thot with new signs, references and descriptions. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a typology of hieroglyphic sign functions. Categorization and fluidity in the description of semiotic systems
Polis, Stéphane ULg

Scientific conference (2015, May 06)

The understanding of the functions of the signs in the hieroglyphic writing system has been an issue ever since knowledge of this script was lost during Late Antiquity. If ancient authors like Horapollo ... [more ▼]

The understanding of the functions of the signs in the hieroglyphic writing system has been an issue ever since knowledge of this script was lost during Late Antiquity. If ancient authors like Horapollo were still aware of the meaning of some hieroglyphs, they were often unable to correctly explain why these signs had such meanings. Jean-François Champollion’s famous Lettre à M. Dacier relative à l’alphabet des hiéroglyphes phonétiques (1822) was to change this state of affair, when the French scholar identified signs “doués de la faculté d’exprimer des sons”. In my lecture, I will review the insights of Egyptologists regarding the functions of hieroglyphs (from Champollion to contemporary scholars, like Kammerzell, Morenz, Schenkel, Vernus and Winand) and argue that the combination of three key-features — namely, semography, phonemography and autonomy — is necessary and sufficient in order to provide a description of the so-called ‘glottic’ functions of the ancient Egyptian graphemes. In a second part of the talk, I provide prototypical examples for each category and discuss interesting cases, which are somehow at the borders between categories, so as to illustrate the diachronic and synchronic gradience of the system. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Ramses Project in interaction / Metadata and Thesauri in Ramsès / Towards a TEI pivot-format for Ancient Egyptian texts
Polis, Stéphane ULg

Conference (2015, April)

Three talks about forthcoming developments in the field of Ancient Egyptian corpus annotation.

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See detailDispreferred structures through language change: the diachrony of affix ordering in Ancient Egyptian - Coptic
Grossman, Eitan; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Conference (2015, March 23)

Given a worldwide preference for suffixes over prefixes, why do some languages nonetheless have a macro-preference for prefixes? In this talk, we show that Ancient Egyptian-Coptic (Afroasiatic) shows a ... [more ▼]

Given a worldwide preference for suffixes over prefixes, why do some languages nonetheless have a macro-preference for prefixes? In this talk, we show that Ancient Egyptian-Coptic (Afroasiatic) shows a long-term diachronic macro-change from mixed suffixing-prefixing to an overwhel¬ming preference for prefixing. We argue that each of the micro-changes implicated in this macro-change are better understood in terms of regular changes at the level of individual constructions, via, e.g., grammaticalization, rather than in terms of a broad Sapirian ‘drift.’ Crucially, it is the particular constellation of structural features of the language at a particular moment in time, together with regular mechanisms of language change, that give rise to the cross-linguistically unusual ‘macro-preference’ of the language. [less ▲]

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See detailProhibitive strategies and prohibitive cycles in Ancient Egyptian
Grossman, Eitan; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Scientific conference (2014, December 11)

In this talk, we present the main prohibitive/negative jussive strategies attested for each state of the language in Ancient Egyptian and we describe the grammaticalization pathways of two prohibitive ... [more ▼]

In this talk, we present the main prohibitive/negative jussive strategies attested for each state of the language in Ancient Egyptian and we describe the grammaticalization pathways of two prohibitive constructions, from Old Egyptian down to Coptic. The paper is structured as follows. In the introduction (§1), a brief review of current typological studies of prohibitives will be given as background information. Then, we start with a description of the two main types of prohibitive constructions that one finds in Coptic, taking into dialectal variety (§2), namely mpr+V(ERB) and mn-V(ERB) “do not V”. Afterwards, we describe the grammaticalization pathway along which the first of these two constructions developed, from Old Egyptian down to Coptic (§3). Additionally, we provide a description of the main prohibitive (as well as negative jussive) strategies that are attested for Earlier (§4) and Later Egyptian (§5), in order to situate more precisely the grammaticalization process of the first strategy within the successive ‘synchronic’ systems of oppositions in the semantic field of prohibition. In a final section (§6), we discuss more in depth the second, more marginal, prohibitive construction of Coptic (mn-V) — investigating Coptic dialectal diversity — and we suggest a diachronic scenario that could account for the appearance and development of this second strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailContexts and inferences: Hypotheses about pragmatics and grammaticalization
Grossman, Eitan; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Scientific conference (2014, May 14)

The goal of the talk is to put on the table for discussion ideas about the interaction between types of context and meaning change characteristic of grammaticalization. Specifically, to ask what – if any ... [more ▼]

The goal of the talk is to put on the table for discussion ideas about the interaction between types of context and meaning change characteristic of grammaticalization. Specifically, to ask what – if any – pragmatic mechanisms facilitate the relaxation of selectional restrictions on grammaticalizing items/constructions, leading from ‘bridging contexts’ to ‘switch contexts’ (Heine 2002), i.e, from utterances with multiple available readings to utterances in which the older reading is unavailable. [less ▲]

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See detailLe projet Ramsès : état et perspectives d'un corpus annoté du néo-égyptien au moment de sa mise en ligne
Polis, Stéphane ULg; Rosmorduc, Serge

Scientific conference (2014, May 10)

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See detailLes chants de harpistes et de luthistes : émergence du littéraire dans l'art funéraire
Polis, Stéphane ULg

Scientific conference (2014, March 25)

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