References of "Polis, Stéphane"
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See detailMethIS V. La valeur de la science. Pourquoi évaluer la recherche
Cormann, Grégory ULg; Dozo, Björn-Olav ULg; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Book published by Presses universitaires de Liège (in press)

Actes du colloque du 10 et 11 décembre 2009 qui s'est tenu à Liège à l'initiative du personnel scientifique

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See detailLa modalité en néo-égyptien
Polis, Stéphane ULg

Book published by Brill (in press)

Cette monographie est issue de ma thèse de doctorat qui constituait la première étude globale de la modalité en néo-égyptien. Le chapitre introductif [§1] est consacré à la définition du corpus néo ... [more ▼]

Cette monographie est issue de ma thèse de doctorat qui constituait la première étude globale de la modalité en néo-égyptien. Le chapitre introductif [§1] est consacré à la définition du corpus néo-égyptien et intègre une discussion des différentes formes de variation (diachronique, diatopique, diaphasique et diastratique) au sein du corpus néo-égyptien. Cet effort définitoire conforte l’assise empirique de l’étude : la ventilation du corpus en fonction de critères chronologiques et géographiques, de la nature du support et des genres littéraires permet d’objectiver les analyses proposées pour chaque expression de la modalité. Le corps du travail se divise en trois parties consacrées, respectivement, [§2] à une définition générale de la notion de modalité (devant permettre de déterminer les media expressifs qui relèvent de son étude en néo-égyptien) ainsi qu’à l’établissement d’un modèle sémantique de cette notion qui réponde aux impératifs d’économie ainsi que de cohérence et qui rende justice aux données typologiques ; [§3] à l’étude des modalités radicales (i.e. les modalités déontiques et bouliques), en envisageant les relations qu’elles entretiennent avec le domaine axiologique ; [§4] à l’examen des modalités assertives ([§4.a] analyse des formes de complémentation, en ce compris les liens entre intégration syntaxique, variation de l’assertivité et degrés de manipulation ; [§4.b] étude de l’impact des auxiliaires d’énonciation sur le degré d’assertivité d’une proposition ; [§4.c] critique des théories existantes concernant les moyens expressifs du discours indirect en néo-égyptien). Les conclusions [§5] sont accompagnées de propositions prospectives devant permettre [§5.a] de rendre le modèle défendu applicable pour l’étude des complexes conditionnels, [§5.b] d’intégrer la dimension énonciative dans l’analyse des relations interpersonnelles, [§5.c] de décrire adéquatement les expressions de la causalité et de la finalité. [less ▲]

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See detailUniversally dispreferred structures through change. The diachrony of affix ordering in Egyptian-Coptic
Grossman, Eitan; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Conference (2017, August 01)

It has been repeatedly observed, on the basis of typological ‘big data,’ that there is a worldwide preference for suffixes as opposed to prefixes. This can be explained in several ways. A possible ... [more ▼]

It has been repeatedly observed, on the basis of typological ‘big data,’ that there is a worldwide preference for suffixes as opposed to prefixes. This can be explained in several ways. A possible explanation is that this feature is a world-wide retention from Proto-World, or is prone to diffusion through language contact. Another possible explanation is that suffixes are preferred for some reason in Universal Grammar or for hitherto unclear general cognitive reasons (Caballero et al. 2008). Yet another explanation is that suffixes are more prone to be created through regular processes of language change, e.g., grammaticalization (Bybee 1985), perhaps due to online usage factors (Himmelmann 2014). The explanation of this preference is directly relevant to a question highlighted in Good (2008), namely, the relationship between language universals and language change: do synchronic structural universals constrain change, or do diachronic universals, ultimately motivated by synchronic usage factors, give rise to synchronic universals? Kiparsky (2008) argues that the form of synchronic grammars constrains change, i.e., languages should not be able to change in such a way that they flout Universal Grammar. On the other hand, for Bybee (2008), the most robust universals are in fact universals of language change, and synchronic states are in a sense epiphenoma. For this question, apparently ‘counter-directional’ changes are crucial: why should language change lead to universally dispreferred distributions of linguistic structures? n this paper, we argue that universally dispreferred structures can and do arise as the result of regular language change, given the right background structures as the particular ‘ecology’ in which change takes place. Specifically, we show that Ancient Egyptian-Coptic (Afroasiatic), shows a long-term diachronic macro-change from mixed suffixing-prefixing to an overwhelming preference for prefixing. The empirical basis for this study is a comparison of ten typologically-significant parameters in which prefixing or affixing is at stake, based on Dryer’s (2013) 969-language sample. With its extremely high prefixing preference, Coptic belongs to the rare 6% or so of languages that are predominantly prefixing (Tables 1,2). Moreover, it has a higher prefixing index (11) than any other language in Dryer’s 969-language sample. The closest competitor is Hunde (Bantu; Democratic Republic of Congo), with a prefixing index of 9.5. In terms of areality, Coptic is an outlier: in mediterranean northern Africa, Coptic is the only language that is predominantly prefixing. We argue that each of the micro-changes implicated in this macro-change are better understood in terms of changes at the level of individual constructions, via grammaticalization, rather than in terms of a broad structural ‘drift.’ Crucially, there is nothing unusual about the actual processes of change themselves; what may be unusual, from a cross-linguistic point of view, is the length of uninterrupted documentation of a single language, which allows us to observe long-term changes with abundant evidence. In short, we argue that Ancient Egyptian-Coptic looks as though it is swimming against the typological tide, although it is constantly paddling along with the usual tides of language change. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamicized semantic maps of content words. Comparing long-term lexical changes in Ancient Egyptian and Greek
Georgakopoulos, Athanasios ULg; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Conference (2017, July 31)

This paper aims at demonstrating how information on the paths of semantic extensions undergone by content words may be incorporated into semantic maps. For this purpose, particular changes that affected ... [more ▼]

This paper aims at demonstrating how information on the paths of semantic extensions undergone by content words may be incorporated into semantic maps. For this purpose, particular changes that affected the meanings of words in the course of the Ancient Egyptian and of the Ancient Greek language history are investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping the diachrony of content words: Ancient Greek and Ancient Egyptian as sources for diachronic semantic maps of lexical items
Georgakopoulos, Athanasios ULg; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Conference (2017, July 12)

This paper aims at demonstrating how information on the paths of semantic extensions undergone by content words may be incorporated into semantic maps. For this purpose, particular changes that affected ... [more ▼]

This paper aims at demonstrating how information on the paths of semantic extensions undergone by content words may be incorporated into semantic maps. For this purpose, particular changes that affected the meanings of words in the course of the Ancient Greek and of the Ancient Egyptian language history will be investigated. The semantic map model was initially created in order to describe the polysemic patterns of grammatical morphemes (e.g. Haspelmath, 2003). However, recent studies by François (2008), Perrin (2010), Wälchli and Cysouw (2012), and Georgakopoulos et al. (2016) have drawn attention to the lexical domain, showing that the model can be extended to lexical items. It should be noted that the bulk of research has been adopting a synchronic perspective and the limited research that has added the diachronic dimension, has focused mostly on the grammatical domain (e.g. Narrog, 2010). In this paper, we analyze the diachronic evolution of the polysemy network of lexemes in order to produce ‘dynamicised semantic maps’ (Narrog & van der Auwera, 2011) of lexical items. More specifically, we study concepts from the semantic domains of TIME. The data are extracted from dictio-naries, grammars, and the Perseus digital library (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/) for Ancient Greek, and from the Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae (http://aaew.bbaw.de/tla/), the Ramses corpus (http://ramses.ulg.ac.be), and etymological dictionaries for Ancient Egyptian. Information on synchronic lexical associations are extracted from CLICS (List et al., 2014), an online database containing tendencies of meaning associations. In CLICS, concepts are represented as nodes in the network and instances of polysemy are visualized as links between the nodes. The diachronic dimension of meaning extension may be added to such a network (Figure 1). On the basis of a diachronic analysis of TIME in Ancient Greek (lexical unit: hṓra), which reveals that the meaning ‘time’ is historically prior to the meaning ‘hour,’ we may add a directed arrow representing directionality of change. However, historical priority is not a sufficient criterion for an arrow to be added. Rather, one should be able to show that meaning extensions have a clear motivation.As such, we suggest identifying the cognitive (e.g. metaphor, metonymy, etc.) and the cultural factors that lie behind the observed evolutions. For example, in the case of the Greek concept TIME, one could establish a metonymic motivation between TIME and HOUR, which arises due to the correlation between the canonical time periods and the time these take to unfold. The present study will provide answers to the question of the directionality of change in two particular languages, namely Ancient Greek and Ancient Egyptian. However, our expectation is that by looking at diachrony in this fashion, significant dimensions of directionality of change with cross-linguistic extensions can be revealed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe diachrony of polysemy networks. Cognitive and cultural motivations for the semantic extension of time-related lexemes in Ancient Greek and Ancient Egyptian – Coptic
Georgakopoulos, Athanasios ULg; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Conference (2017, June 02)

This paper aims at contrasting the semantic extension of time-related lexemes in Ancient Greek and Ancient Egyptian – Coptic in order to identify shared cognitive motivations and to assess the potential ... [more ▼]

This paper aims at contrasting the semantic extension of time-related lexemes in Ancient Greek and Ancient Egyptian – Coptic in order to identify shared cognitive motivations and to assess the potential impact of cultural factors on the evolution of this lexical field in both languages. In doing so we first take as a point of departure semantic networks inferred from synchronic polysemy data in large language samples, such as Youn et al. (2016) and CLICS (List et al., 2014). In a second step, we identify the lexemes that lexicalize meanings associated with DAY/DAYTIME/TIME in Ancient Greek (8th – 1st c. BC) and Ancient Egyptian (26th c. BC – 10th c. AD), two languages with significant diachronic material. The data are extracted from dictionaries, grammars, and from the Perseus digital library (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/) for Ancient Greek, and from the Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae (http://aaew.bbaw.de/tla/), the Ramses corpus (http://ramses.ulg.ac.be), and Coptic etymological dictionaries for Ancient Egyptian. Based on this diachronic material we describe the semantic extensions of time-related lexemes and map them onto the synchronic polysemy networks. In a final step, our results are checked against The Catalogue of Semantic Shifts in the Languages of the World (http://semshifts.iling-ran.ru/). Fig. 1 exemplifies how meaning extension may be added to polysemy networks. A diachronic analysis reveals that, for the Ancient Greek lexical unit hṓra, the meaning ‘time’ is historically prior to the meaning ‘hour.’ Accordingly, we may add a directed arrow representing the directionality of change from ‘time’ to ‘hour.’ Similarly, Ancient Egyptian data points to an extension of the polysemy network of the lexical unit tr – originally meaning ‘time,’ ‘moment in time’ – to ‘season’ (cf. Coptic ⲧⲏ tê ‘time, season’). One can then describe the cognitive motivations (e.g., metaphor, metonymy, etc.) for meaning extensions and analyze the cultural factors underlying the observed evolutions. In the case of the Greek word hṓra, for instance, a metonymic motivation between TIME and HOUR could be established. Finally, the analysis can be refined by searching in the corpus bridging contexts that allow such extensions of the polysemy networks of content items. The approach adopted here is closely connected to the semantic map method, which has recently shifted its focus from the study of the polysemic patterns of grammatical morphemes (in this respect, see, e.g., Haspelmath, 2003) to the study of lexical items (e.g., François, 2008, Perrin, 2010, Wälchli and Cysouw 2012, and Georgakopoulos et al., 2016). As such, our paper has also a methodological bearing on the semantic map model, both because of its focus on content words and on diachrony (see van der Auwera, 2008; Narrog, 2010; Luraghi, 2014; Juvonen and Koptjevskaja-Tamm, 2016). All things considered, this diachronic take on the polysemic networks of lexemes belonging to a particular semantic domain offers a new perspective on dealing with the question of the directionality of meaning change. [less ▲]

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See detailNarration et argumentation. Retour sur l’analyse du discours en sciences sociales
Lttr13; Badir, Sémir ULg; Polis, Stéphane ULg et al

Conference (2017, May 31)

En 1979 a paru un ouvrage dirigé par A.J. Greimas et É. Landowski, intitulé « Introduction à l’analyse du discours en sciences sociales ». L’ouvrage n’a pas connu le succès de son contemporain, publié la ... [more ▼]

En 1979 a paru un ouvrage dirigé par A.J. Greimas et É. Landowski, intitulé « Introduction à l’analyse du discours en sciences sociales ». L’ouvrage n’a pas connu le succès de son contemporain, publié la même année, le célèbre « Sémiotique. Dictionnaire de la théorie du langage ». On souhaite dans cette communication proposer un bilan critique, en comparant les postulats de la méthode sémiotique avec ceux d’autres modèles d’analyse, et soulever quelques questions théoriques relatives aux types de discours. L’ouvrage de Greimas et Landowski s’inscrit dans le projet général d’extension du modèle narratif d’analyse textuelle. Selon ce projet, le modèle initialement développé en vue de l’analyse des contes et des mythes peut être appliqué à différents types de discours en envisageant dans leur variété, suivant « un degré croissant de complexité et d’abstraction », les « formes de production sociale du sens » (Greimas & Landowski, p. 5, passim). Le modèle étend ainsi la notion de récit à tout type de discours, à toute forme textuelle, ainsi que le confirme le « Dictionnaire ». Cette extension généralisée prend appui sur une typologie des discours qu’illustrent des analyses particulières publiés dans les années 1980 (Bastide 1981 ; Bastide & Fabbri éds 1985 ; Landowski 1986). Déjà en 1966, dans « Sémantique structurale », Greimas prévoyait une typologie de quatre types de « micro-univers sémantiques » (p. 128) où s’opposent, en fonction de deux critères, les univers dits « idéologiques » (dont ressortit le conte populaire) et les univers « scientifiques ». On peut considérer que la proposition de recherche qu’ont dirigée Greimas et Landowski est ainsi située au point le plus éloigné d’élaboration et d’application initiale du modèle suivi et qu’elle constitue par conséquent une expérience-limite pour le modèle narratif. Ce faisant, l’approche sémiotique prenait le risque d’être confrontée à d’autres modèles d’analyse, tels qu’ils se sont élaborés dans des cadres théoriques issus de la rhétorique (réactualisée dans les années 1950 par Chaïm Perelman et son école), de la pragmatique (cf. Parret 1983 & 1987), de la sociologie de la connaissance (à partir de l’ouvrage fondateur de Berger & Luckmann 1966) ou comme ils relèvent d’autres courants théoriques en sciences du langage (notamment, en France, l’analyse du discours d’inspiration althussérienne). Pour l’analyse des discours en sciences sociales, ces modèles offrent deux avantages sur celui de la sémiotique : d’une part, il semble que les postulats théoriques sur lesquels ils sont construits s’accordent plus directement au type que ces discours constituent ; d’autre part, ils peuvent désormais compter sur une solide tradition d’études permettant de pérenniser les résultats. La congruence apparente entre modèles d’analyse et types de discours, malgré l’extension d’applicabilité à laquelle ces modèles peuvent prétendre, soulève des questions relatives à la légitimité d’une typologie des discours. Celle-ci peut-elle se mettre au-dessus des postulats théoriques qui forgent les appariements entre modèle d’analyse et type de discours ? Si ce n’est le cas, quels enjeux la question typologique permet-elle de soulever ? Outre celle de Greimas évoquée plus haut, les tentatives qui ont été proposées à ce sujet (notamment van Dijk 1972 & 1975 ; Adam 1999 & 2011 ; Bronckart 1997 ; Maingueneau 2007), nous permettront d’en donner au moins une idée. [less ▲]

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See detailA method for encoding Egyptian quadrats in Unicode
Glass, Andrew; Hafemann, Ingelore; Nederhof, Mark-Jan et al

Computer development (2017)

The proposal to encode three control characters for Egyptian Hieroglyphs was accepted at the February 2016 UTC meeting. Following that acceptance some members of the Egyptological community raised ... [more ▼]

The proposal to encode three control characters for Egyptian Hieroglyphs was accepted at the February 2016 UTC meeting. Following that acceptance some members of the Egyptological community raised concerns that the accepted controls were insufficient for their requirements. This led to a series of discussions and document submissions between specialists and implementers that explored the issues relating to encoding the quadrat structures that are an inherent feature of Egyptian Hieroglyphic writing. The present document combines expert input on Egyptian Hieroglyphs and a detailed exploration of possible solutions. It does not attempt to summarize or repeat arguments and details from earlier documents. Cross-references to earlier submissions are provided where appropriate. The result is a draft proposal for a system of controls that will enable plain text encoding of Egyptian Hieroglyphs in quadrats. [less ▲]

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See detailHieroglyphic encoding & hieroglyphic sign-lists. From the Ramses Project to the Thot Sign-List
Polis, Stéphane ULg

Scientific conference (2017, March 14)

Based on systematic observations regarding the encoding of hieroglyphs in an electronic corpus, specifically the Ramses corpus (ramses.ulg.ac.be), the aim of this presentation was to introduce and discuss ... [more ▼]

Based on systematic observations regarding the encoding of hieroglyphs in an electronic corpus, specifically the Ramses corpus (ramses.ulg.ac.be), the aim of this presentation was to introduce and discuss the data-model of the Thot Sign-List (under development at the university of Liège) and to present online resources made available for documenting the elements of this model (http://thot.philo.ulg.ac.be/index.html). Among the future goals is a strengthened collaboration between the AKU project and the Thot Sign-List (e.g., a shared hieroglyphic sign-list and a connection between the graphemes analysed by the AKU project and the texts of Ramses Online). [less ▲]

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See detailLe Diasema. Lexical Diachronic semantic maps: Representing and explaining meaning extension. A short introduction to the project
Georgakopoulos, Athanasios ULg; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Scientific conference (2017, March 10)

An introduction to the main aspects of the project 'Le Diasema: Lexical Diachronic semantic maps. Representing and explaining meaning extension'.

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See detailAncient Egyptian philology: The digital turn. Current projects and future perspectives for the study of Ancient Egyptian texts
Polis, Stéphane ULg; Razanajao, Vincent ULg

Conference (2017, February 21)

Use of Information Technologies in Egyptology can be traced back to the early 1960s, when first efforts were made in documenting Meroitic scripts or emblematic corpora such as the Pyramid Texts. With the ... [more ▼]

Use of Information Technologies in Egyptology can be traced back to the early 1960s, when first efforts were made in documenting Meroitic scripts or emblematic corpora such as the Pyramid Texts. With the rise of the Digital Humanities in the mid-2000s, many new academic projects that implement IT solutions not only as a way to manage and present data, but also to produce, process and analyse the material, have come to light in the field. The aim of this paper is to give a survey of current digital projects related to the study of ancient Egyptian and Coptic texts. Our goal is not to be exhaustive, but to discuss the methods and tools that are being used and to describe the variety of scholarly practices. The first set of projects to be examined are those related to digital text editions and annotated corpora (including the types of representation format). Second, the question of how to handle the complex writing systems of Ancient Egypt will be addressed by looking at projects that focus on encoding (Manuel de Codage vs Unicode), on establishing hieroglyphic sign-lists (the Thot-Sign-List), on palaeographical databases and on ways to OCRize original texts efficiently. The issue of interoperability and data sharing will then be investigated through a presentation of several related projects working on a XML/TEI interchange format as well as on digital resources for enabling a Linked Open Data approach to the ancient Egyptian written material (http://thot.philo.ulg.ac.be/). Finally, we will argue in favour of a coherent data model so that encoding of data and metadata is done in the most effective way. [less ▲]

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See detailLe Projet Ramsès. Explorer la langue des pharaons au XXIe siècle
Motte, Aurore ULg; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Conference (2017, February 08)

En nous appuyant sur un historique de la chaire d’égyptologie à l’ULg (depuis sa création en 1902), nous montrons comment le Projet Ramsès est venu s’inscrire au cœur des projets de recherche du service ... [more ▼]

En nous appuyant sur un historique de la chaire d’égyptologie à l’ULg (depuis sa création en 1902), nous montrons comment le Projet Ramsès est venu s’inscrire au cœur des projets de recherche du service d’égyptologie à partir de 2006. La présentation s’attache ensuite à en présenter les derniers développements et à illustrer le caractère novateur de ce projet, tant du point de vue de l’égyptologie et de la linguistique de corpus, que du point de vue — plus large — des humanités numériques. Nous décrirons enfin le réseau de recherche européen dont il participe aujourd’hui, impliquant des collaborations suivies avec différents projets d’ampleur. [less ▲]

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See detailA comprehensive system of control characters for Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic text in Unicode
Nederhof, Mark-Jan; Rajan, Vinodh; Lang, Johannes et al

Computer development (2017)

We propose a comprehensive system of control characters for encoding Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs in Unicode.

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See detailLinguistic variation in Ancient Egyptian. An introduction to the state of the art (with special attention to the community of Deir el-Medina)
Polis, Stéphane ULg

in Cromwell, Jennifer; Grossman, Eitan (Eds.) Scribal Repertoires in Egypt from the New Kingdom to the Early Islamic Period (2017)

In this chapter, I explore different aspects of the variability ‘inherent to human languages’ as it manifests itself in the corpus of pre-Demotic texts from Ancient Egypt. More specifically, I adopt a ... [more ▼]

In this chapter, I explore different aspects of the variability ‘inherent to human languages’ as it manifests itself in the corpus of pre-Demotic texts from Ancient Egypt. More specifically, I adopt a sociolinguistic perspective and describe the types of impact that extra-linguistic factors have had on the written performance in this specific socio-cultural setting. [less ▲]

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See detailThe scribal repertoire of Amennakhte son of Ipuy. Describing variation across Late Egyptian registers
Polis, Stéphane ULg

in Cromwell, Jennifer; Grossman, Eitan (Eds.) Scribal Repertoires in Egypt from the New Kingdom to the Early Islamic Period (2017)

The aim of this chapter is to investigate diaphasic variation in the texts written by the Deir el-Medina scribe Amennakhte son of Ipuy in New Kingdom Egypt (ca. 1150 BCE) by analysing the graphemic and ... [more ▼]

The aim of this chapter is to investigate diaphasic variation in the texts written by the Deir el-Medina scribe Amennakhte son of Ipuy in New Kingdom Egypt (ca. 1150 BCE) by analysing the graphemic and linguistic features of the registers used by this individual when writing texts belonging to different genres. The registers are conceived here as selections operating within the scribal repertoire. At an empirical level, this study is intended as a first step towards a comprehensive description of the types of linguistic variation found within the written production of the Deir el-Medina community in New Kingdom Egypt (ca. 1500–1050 BCE). At a more methodological level, as a case study testing the applicability of some historical sociolinguistic methods in the field of Ancient Egyptian, which could ultimately result in refining our approach to its diachrony. [less ▲]

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See detailPolysemy networks in language contact. The borrowing of the Greek-origin Preposition κατά/ⲕⲁⲧⲁ in Coptic
Grossman, Eitan; Polis, Stéphane ULg

in Dils, Peter; Grossman, Eitan; Richter, Tonio Sebastian (Eds.) et al Greek Influence on Egyptian-Coptic (2017)

This paper explores a particular aspect of the semantics of adposition borrowing, focusing on the extent to which polysemy networks associated with model language adpositions are copied in the target ... [more ▼]

This paper explores a particular aspect of the semantics of adposition borrowing, focusing on the extent to which polysemy networks associated with model language adpositions are copied in the target language. We make use of the distinction between comparative concepts and descriptive categories (Haspelmath 2010) to describe the integration of loanwords in a target language, in this case Greek-origin adpositions in Coptic. Taking the Greek-origin adposition κατά (katá) in Coptic as a case study, we show that entire polysemy networks are not borrowed. Rather, only some sections – not necessarily contiguous on a semantic map – of polysemy networks are borrowed. We conclude that this points to the possibility that loanwords are bor- rowed in individual constructions. [less ▲]

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See detailExplorer la variation graphique dans les sources hiératiques de l’époque ramesside : Le scribe Amennakhte, sa main, son école
Polis, Stéphane ULg

Scientific conference (2016, December 07)

L'exposé est articulé en trois parties. Il s'ouvre sur un typologie de la variation dans les sources hiératiques du Nouvel Empire et vise à explorer les causes de cette dernière. Après quelques éléments ... [more ▼]

L'exposé est articulé en trois parties. Il s'ouvre sur un typologie de la variation dans les sources hiératiques du Nouvel Empire et vise à explorer les causes de cette dernière. Après quelques éléments de contextualisation concernant la communauté des ouvriers de la Tombe à Deir el-Médineh, la seconde partie est consacrée, d'une part, à la question de la construction de la norme - entre enseignement collectif et apprentissage individuel - et, d'autre part, à la diversité de la performance écrite (à travers l'examen de textes littéraires produits par Amennakhte et son ‘école’). En conclusion, je présente trois cas illustrant des voies fructueuses dans l'identification des mains de scribes et le regroupement de documents sur base paléographique. [less ▲]

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See detailAncient Egyptian texts in contexts. Towards a conceptual data model (the Thot Data Model - TDM)
Polis, Stéphane ULg; Razanajao, Vincent ULg

in Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies (2016), 59(2), 24-41

In this paper, we propose a conceptual data model that could be the basis for future implementations of databases and digital corpuses of Ancient Egyptian texts that fully integrate the material ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we propose a conceptual data model that could be the basis for future implementations of databases and digital corpuses of Ancient Egyptian texts that fully integrate the material dimensions of writing. The types of metadata that can be used for documenting the elements and relationships of this model are discussed and the resources (URIs) available for its online implementation (in the perspective of the ‘linked open data’ movement) are examined. [less ▲]

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See detailNouveaux textes littéraires du scribe Amennakhte (et autres ostraca relatifs au scribe de la Tombe)
Dorn, Andreas ULg; Polis, Stéphane ULg

in Bulletin de l'Institut Français d'Archéologie Orientale (2016), 116

Cet article est le premier d’une série de contributions consacrées à la publication de documents inédits conservés à l’Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale et ayant pour point commun le fait d’être ... [more ▼]

Cet article est le premier d’une série de contributions consacrées à la publication de documents inédits conservés à l’Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale et ayant pour point commun le fait d’être, plus ou moins directement, liés au fameux scribe de la Tombe Amennakhte, fils d’Ipouy. L’objectif est de fournir les matériaux de base qui seront nécessaires à la réalisation de projets de plus grande ampleur, telles une étude micro-historique autour de l’individu en question et une analyse globale de la production textuelle d’un scribe de Deir el-Médineh à la 20e dynastie. Les six ostraca publiés ici appartiennent au fonds des ostraca dits « littéraires » de l’IFAO. Les deux premiers documents sont assurément les plus remarquables dans la mesure où ils viennent enrichir le nombre des textes littéraires ‘signés’ par le scribe Amennakhte. [less ▲]

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See detailThe genesis of a negative agentive nominalizer. The journey of jwtj between Old Egyptian and Coptic
Grossman, Eitan; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Conference (2016, October 21)

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