References of "Poirier, Colline"
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See detailOwn song selectivity in the songbird auditory pathway: Suppression by norepinephrine
Poirier, Colline; Boumans, Tiny; Vellema, Michiel et al

in PLoS ONE (2011), 6(5), 20131

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See detailOwn song selectivity in the songbird auditory pathway: suppression by norepinephrine
Poirier, Colline; Boumans, Tiny; Vellema, Michiel et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailOwn-song recognition in the songbird auditory pathway: selectivity and lateralization.
Poirier, Colline; Boumans, Tiny; Verhoye, Marleen et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2009), 29(7), 2252-8

The songbird brain is able to discriminate between the bird's own song and other conspecific songs. Determining where in the brain own- song selectivity emerges is of great importance because experience ... [more ▼]

The songbird brain is able to discriminate between the bird's own song and other conspecific songs. Determining where in the brain own- song selectivity emerges is of great importance because experience-dependent mechanisms are necessarily involved and because brain regions sensitive to self-generated vocalizations could mediate auditory feedback that is necessary for song learning and maintenance. Using functional MRI, here we show that this selectivity is present at the midbrain level. Surprisingly, the selectivity was found to be lateralized toward the right side, a finding reminiscent of the potential right lateralization of song production in zebra finches but also of own-face and own-voice recognition in human beings. These results indicate that a midbrain structure can process subtle information about the identity of a subject through experience-dependent mechanisms, challenging the classical perception of subcortical regions as primitive and nonplastic structures. They also open questions about the evolution of the cognitive skills and lateralization in vertebrates. [less ▲]

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See detailA three-dimensional MRI atlas of the zebra finch brain in stereotaxic coordinates.
Poirier, Colline; Vellema, Michiel; Verhoye, Marleen et al

in NeuroImage (2008), 41(1), 1-6

The neurobiology of birdsong, as a model for human speech, is a fast growing area of research in the neurosciences and involves electrophysiological, histological and more recently magnetic resonance ... [more ▼]

The neurobiology of birdsong, as a model for human speech, is a fast growing area of research in the neurosciences and involves electrophysiological, histological and more recently magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches. Many of these studies require the identification and localization of different brain areas (nuclei) involved in the sensory and motor control of song. Until now, the only published atlases of songbird brains consisted in drawings based on histological slices of the canary and of the zebra finch brain. Taking advantage of high-magnetic field (7 Tesla) MRI technique, we present the first high-resolution (80 x 160 x 160 microm) 3-D digital atlas in stereotaxic coordinates of a male zebra finch brain, the most widely used species in the study of birdsong neurobiology. Image quality allowed us to discern most of the song control, auditory and visual nuclei. The atlas can be freely downloaded from our Web site and can be interactively explored with MRIcro. This zebra finch MRI atlas should become a very useful tool for neuroscientists working on birdsong, especially for co-registrating MRI data but also for determining accurately the optimal coordinates and angular approach for injections or electrophysiological recordings. [less ▲]

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