References of "Pirottin, Dimitri"
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See detailEctopic Expression of Retrotransposon-Derived PEG11/RTL1 Contributes to the Callipyge Muscular Hypertrophy.
Xu, Xuewen; Ectors, Fabien ULg; Davis, Erica E. et al

in PloS one (2015), 10(10), 0140594

The callipyge phenotype is an ovine muscular hypertrophy characterized by polar overdominance: only heterozygous +Mat/CLPGPat animals receiving the CLPG mutation from their father express the phenotype ... [more ▼]

The callipyge phenotype is an ovine muscular hypertrophy characterized by polar overdominance: only heterozygous +Mat/CLPGPat animals receiving the CLPG mutation from their father express the phenotype. +Mat/CLPGPat animals are characterized by postnatal, ectopic expression of Delta-like 1 homologue (DLK1) and Paternally expressed gene 11/Retrotransposon-like 1 (PEG11/RTL1) proteins in skeletal muscle. We showed previously in transgenic mice that ectopic expression of DLK1 alone induces a muscular hypertrophy, hence demonstrating a role for DLK1 in determining the callipyge hypertrophy. We herein describe newly generated transgenic mice that ectopically express PEG11 in skeletal muscle, and show that they also exhibit a muscular hypertrophy phenotype. Our data suggest that both DLK1 and PEG11 act together in causing the muscular hypertrophy of callipyge sheep. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of a CpG-ODN on the innate immune system of the horse: an in-vivo trial
Tosi, Irène ULg; Pirottin, Dimitri ULg; Fievez, Laurence ULg et al

Poster (2015, October 16)

Oligodeoxynucleotides containing cytosine-phosphate-guanosine motifs (CpG-ODN) represent a class of agonists of Toll-like Receptor 9 (TLR9). TLR9 activation induces the secretion of cytokines and the ... [more ▼]

Oligodeoxynucleotides containing cytosine-phosphate-guanosine motifs (CpG-ODN) represent a class of agonists of Toll-like Receptor 9 (TLR9). TLR9 activation induces the secretion of cytokines and the maturation of immune cells, thus initiating both innate and adaptive immune responses. Therefore, CpG-ODN has been investigated in different species as a potential immune-modulator targeting infectious, allergic and neoplastic diseases. It has been administered by nebulisation to RAO-affected horses with promising results. Nonetheless, there is no in-vivo study on the effect of CpG administered systemically to the horse. Therefore, we tested the effect of CpG, given by intramuscular injection, on the equine immune response. Eight horses were used for this study. Five mg/horse were injected to 4 horses at D0 and D7; the other horses received a placebo (PBS). Blood was collected 2 days prior to each injection, then regularly up to D21. A clinical exam was realised daily. Laboratory analyses included haematology, ELISA tests for IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and IL-10 and cytometry analyses for MCHII and CD86 expressions on B-lymphocytes. A cross-over of the 2 groups was realised after 2 months of washout. CpG was well tolerated. Significant transient eosinopenia, monocytosis and leukopenia were observed after CpG injection, while ELISA and cytometry analyses did not reveal any significant modification. This trial represents the first in-vivo study where CpG is administered systemically to healthy horses. Further studies are needed to adjust the dose, the formulation and the sampling schedule and to fully investigate this molecule as potentiel modulator of the equine immune system. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterisation of TLR7/8 in equine pulmonary alveolar macrophages
Tosi, Irène ULg; Frellstedt, Linda; Pirottin, Dimitri ULg et al

Poster (2015, October 08)

Purpose of the study: In both human and equine athletes, viral infections are common causes of respiratory diseases and of a sudden deterioration of expected performances. In both species, the underlying ... [more ▼]

Purpose of the study: In both human and equine athletes, viral infections are common causes of respiratory diseases and of a sudden deterioration of expected performances. In both species, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear, and an involvement of Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), a fundamental link between innate and adaptive immunity, has been advocated. Our objectives were to verify the presence of TLR7 and TLR8, responsible for the early anti-viral response in mammals, in equine pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and to assess their function through specific stimulation. Methods used: Equine PAMs were collected by broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), isolated by adherence and stimulated with specific TLR7/8 ligands (an imidazoquinoline compound and single-stranded RNA), mimicking a viral attack. The expression of TLR7/8 was evaluated by rt-PCR and the ligand-induced production of cytokines (type I-IFNs and TNF-α) was assessed via ELISA. Summary of results: Our study demonstrated the expression of TLR7/8 in equine PAMs. QPCR analyses showed a high relative expression of genes coding for TLR7 and TLR8 on equine PAM. Stimulation with specific TLR7/8 ligands resulted in significantly up-regulated production of IFN-β and TNF-α, thereby confirming that TLR7/8 are functional in equine PAMs and that they play a role in the early pulmonary antiviral response. Conclusions: This study shows that TLR7 and TLR8 are present and functional in equine PAM and that they could play a role in the early pulmonary antiviral response. In terms of future perspectives, it is interesting to suggest that the extensively demonstrated efficacy of TLR7 and TLR8 synthetic ligands in the treatment of viral diseases in human medicine could motivate the pursuit of clinical trials in the equine patient for the therapeutic management or prevention of viral respiratory infections. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression microarray as a tool to identify candidate blood biomarkers in horses suffering from inflammatory airway disease
Ramery, Eve ULg; Fraipont, Audrey ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Veterinary Clinical Pathology (2015), 44(1), 37-46

Background: Inflammatory airway disease (IAD) affects performance and well-being in horses. Diagnosis is primarily reached by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology but this is invasive and requires ... [more ▼]

Background: Inflammatory airway disease (IAD) affects performance and well-being in horses. Diagnosis is primarily reached by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology but this is invasive and requires sedation. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to identify candidate blood biomarkers of IAD using species-specific expression microarrays. Methods: Horse Gene Expression Microarrays were used to investigate global mRNA expression in circulating leukocytes from healthy and IAD-affected standardbreds and endurance horses. Results: Nine genes were significantly differentially regulated in standardbreds and 61 in endurance horses (P < 0.001). These genes were mainly related to inflammation (eg. ALOX15B, PLA2G12B and PENK), oxidant/antioxidant balance (eg. DUOXA2 and GSTO1-1) and stress (eg. V1aR, GRLF1, Homer-2 and MAOB). DUOXA2, ALOX15B, PLA2G12B, MAOB and GRLF1 variations of expression were further validated by RT-qPCR. The deregulation of the oxidant/antioxidant balance was demonstrated at the protein level by an increase of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in heparinised whole blood of IAD-affected standardbreds (P = 0.0025) and endurance horses (P = 0.0028). There was good correlation (r = 0.7354) between BAL neutrophil percentage and whole blood GPx activity in all horses. Conclusions: There is accumulating evidence that, even when systemic clinical signs are not evident, circulating leukocyte gene expression can reflect responses of other tissues, leading to potential diagnostic applications in the future. Although not specific for IAD, whole blood GPx activity appears to reflect BAL neutrophil percentage. This finding should be further assessed by testing a larger number of horses. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Innate Immune Response of Equine Bronchial Epithelial Cells is Altered by Training
Frellstedt, Linda ULg; Gosset, Philippe; Kervoaze, Gwenola et al

in Veterinary Research (2015), 46(3), 1-12

Respiratory diseases, including inflammatory airway disease (IAD), viral and bacterial infections, are common problems in exercising horses. The airway epithelium constitutes a major physical barrier ... [more ▼]

Respiratory diseases, including inflammatory airway disease (IAD), viral and bacterial infections, are common problems in exercising horses. The airway epithelium constitutes a major physical barrier against airborne infections and plays an essential role in the lung innate immune response mainly through toll-like receptor (TLR) activation. The aim of this study was to develop a model for the culture of equine bronchial epithelial cells (EBEC) in vitro and to explore EBEC innate immune responses in trained horses. Bronchial epithelial biopsies were taken from 6 adult horses during lower airway endoscopy. EBEC were grown in vitro by an explant method. The innate immune response of EBEC was evaluated in vitro by treatment with TLR ligands. TLR3 is the most strongly expressed TLR at the mRNA level in EBEC and stimulation of EBEC with Poly(I:C), an analog of viral dsRNA, triggers a strong secretion of IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and CXCL8. We further evaluated the EBEC innate immune response in horses that underwent a 4-month-training program. While training had no effect on TLR mRNA expression in EBEC as well as in bronchial biopsies, it increased the production of IFN-β after stimulation with a TLR3 ligand and decreased the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 after stimulation with a TLR2 and TLR3 ligand. These findings may be implicated in the increased risk for viral and bacterial infections observed in sport horses. Altogether, we report a successful model for the culture of EBEC that can be applied to the investigation of pathophysiologic conditions in longitudinal studies. [less ▲]

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See detailTraining Modifies Innate Immune Responses in Blood Monocytes and in Pulmonary Alveolar Macrophages
Frellstedt, Linda ULg; Waldschmidt, Ingrid; Gosset, Philippe et al

in American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology (2014), 51(1), 135-142

In humans, strenuous exercise causes increased susceptibility to respiratory infections associated with down-regulated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), co-stimulatory and antigen-presenting ... [more ▼]

In humans, strenuous exercise causes increased susceptibility to respiratory infections associated with down-regulated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), co-stimulatory and antigen-presenting molecules. Lower airway diseases are also a common problem in sport and racing horses. Because the innate immunity plays an essential role in lung defense mechanisms, we aimed to assess the effect of acute exercise and training on innate immune responses in two different compartments. Blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) were collected from horses in an untrained, moderately and intensively trained as well as deconditioned state before and after a strenuous exercise test (SET). The cells were analysed for TLR mRNA expression by real-time PCR in vitro and the cytokine production after in vitro stimulation with TLR ligands was measured by ELISA. Our results showed that training, but not acute exercise, modified the innate immune responses in both compartments. The mRNA expression of TLR3 was down-regulated by training in both cell types, whereas the expression of TLR4 was up-regulated in monocytes. Monocytes treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and a synthetic diacylated lipoprotein (FSL) showed increased cytokine secretion in trained and deconditioned subjects indicating the activation of cells at the systemic level. The production of TNF-alpha and IFN-beta in non-stimulated and stimulated PAM was decreased in trained and deconditioned horses and might therefore explain the increased susceptibility to respiratory infections. Our study reports a dissociation between the systemic and the lung response to training that is probably implicated in the systemic inflammation and in the pulmonary susceptibility to infection. [less ▲]

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See detailTraining modifies the innate immune response both in the airways and in blood in horses
Frellstedt, Linda ULg; Gosset, Philippe; Desmet, Christophe ULg et al

in Proceedings of the ICI (2013)

Lower airway diseases are common problems in sports and racing horses. In humans, exercise has been associated with upper respiratory tract infections due to down-regulated expression of Toll-like ... [more ▼]

Lower airway diseases are common problems in sports and racing horses. In humans, exercise has been associated with upper respiratory tract infections due to down-regulated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), costimulatory and antigen-presenting molecules on monocytes. The objectives of this study were 1) to examine the expression of TLRs in equine bronchial epithelial cells (EBEC) and blood monocytes in untrained and trained horses; 2) to stimulate EBEC and monocytes in vitro with TLR ligands, in order to mimic bacterial/viral infections; 3) to compare the cytokine production of EBEC and monocytes in untrained and trained horses. Bronchial biopsies were taken from 8 horses during lower airway endoscopy at rest and 24 hours after a standardized exercise test (SET). Bronchial epithelial cells were grown in vitro and activated with TLR ligands. Blood monocytes were collected at rest and after the SET. TLR1-TLR9 expression was evaluated via real-time PCR and cytokine production was measured via ELISA. TLR3 and TLR4 expression was modified by training. The expression of TLR2, TLR7 and TLR8 was modified only by strenuous exercise in trained horses. Training had local immuno-suppressive effects shown by a decreased production of TNF-alpha and IFN-beta in EBEC in response to TLR2 and TLR3 ligands. Training also caused a systemic pro-inflammatory response evidenced by increased production of TNF-alpha in monocytes in response to TLR2 and TLR4 ligands. These findings suggest that training and strenuous exercise in trained subjects may result in an increased susceptibility of the lower airway to infections associated with systemic inflammation. [less ▲]

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See detailExercise modifies the innate immune response in equine bronchial epithelial cells
Frellstedt, Linda ULg; Gosset, Philippe; Pirottin, Dimitri ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (University of Liege - Belgium) (2013)

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See detailExperimental model of equine alveolar macrophage stimulation with TLR ligands.
Waldschmidt, Ingrid; Pirottin, Dimitri ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2013), 155(1-2), 30-37

Pulmonary diseases are common in horses and have a major economic impact on the equine industry. Some of them could be associated with an inadequate immune response in the lung, but methods to evaluate ... [more ▼]

Pulmonary diseases are common in horses and have a major economic impact on the equine industry. Some of them could be associated with an inadequate immune response in the lung, but methods to evaluate this response in horses are lacking. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an experimental model that could be applied in several physiological and pathological conditions to assess the innate immune response of equine pulmonary cells. Equine alveolar macrophages (AMs) obtained from bronchoalveolar lavages were isolated from other cells by adhesion. TLR2, 3, and 4 expression in AMs was studied and their responses to commercial ligands (respectively FSL-1, Poly(I:C), and LPS) were evaluated after determination of the appropriate dose and time of incubation. TLR responses were assessed by measuring cytokine production using (1) gene expression of TNFalpha, IFNbeta, Il-1beta, and IFNalpha by qPCR (indirect method); and (2) cytokine production for TNFalpha and IFNbeta by ELISA (direct method). TLR 2, 3, and 4 were expressed by AMs. TLR 2 stimulation with 10ng/mL of FSL-1 during 3h significantly increased IL-1beta and TNFalpha gene expression. TLR 3 stimulation with 1000ng/mL of Poly(I:C) during 1h increased IFNbeta, IFNalpha, Il-1beta and TNFalpha expression. TLR 4 stimulation with 100ng/mL of LPS during 3h increased TNFalpha, IFNbeta, and Il-1beta expression. Results obtained by ELISA quantification of TNFalpha and IFNbeta produced by AMs following stimulation during 6h were similar: FSL-1 increased TNFalpha production but not IFNbeta, Poly(I:C) and LPS increased production of IFNbeta and TNFalpha. In conclusion, pulmonary innate immunity of horses can be assessed ex vivo by measuring cytokine production following stimulation of AMs with TLR agonists. This experimental model could be applied under several conditions especially to improve the understanding of equine respiratory disease pathogenesis, and to suggest novel therapeutic opportunities. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of the effect of exercise on the innate immunity in horses
Frellstedt, Linda ULg; Gosset, Philippe; Desmet, Christophe ULg et al

Poster (2012, October 19)

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See detailIncreased hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha expression in lung cells of horses with recurrent airway obstruction.
Toussaint, Marie ULg; Fievez, Laurence ULg; Desmet, Christophe ULg et al

in BMC Veterinary Research (2012), 8(1), 64

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO, also known as equine heaves) is an inflammatory condition caused by exposure of susceptible horses to organic dusts in hay. The immunological ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO, also known as equine heaves) is an inflammatory condition caused by exposure of susceptible horses to organic dusts in hay. The immunological processes responsible for the development and the persistence of airway inflammation are still largely unknown. Hypoxia-inducible factor (Hif) is mainly known as a major regulator of energy homeostasis and cellular adaptation to hypoxia. More recently however, Hif also emerged as an essential regulator of innate immune responses. Here, we aimed at investigating the potential involvement of Hif1-alpha in myeloid cells in horse with recurrent airway obstruction. RESULTS: In vitro, we observed that Hif is expressed in equine myeloid cells after hay dust stimulation and regulates genes such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A). We further showed in vivo that airway challenge with hay dust upregulated Hif1-alpha mRNA expression in myeloid cells from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of healthy and RAO-affected horses, with a more pronounced effect in cells from RAO-affected horses. Finally, Hif1-alpha mRNA expression in BALF cells from challenged horses correlated positively with lung dysfunction. CONCLUSION: Taken together, our results suggest an important role for Hif1-alpha in myeloid cells during hay dust-induced inflammation in horses with RAO. We therefore propose that future research aiming at functional inactivation of Hif1 in lung myeloid cells could open new therapeutic perspectives for RAO. [less ▲]

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See detailLe microdamier d’expression : un outil performant dans la compréhension de la réponse
Schoeneker, Julie; Art, Tatiana ULg; Pirottin, Dimitri ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2011), 154

Malgré de multiples études, les interrelations entre l’exercice, le stress et la réponse immune sont peu définies. Or, la compréhension de ces interrelations pourrait jouer un rôle très important dans ... [more ▼]

Malgré de multiples études, les interrelations entre l’exercice, le stress et la réponse immune sont peu définies. Or, la compréhension de ces interrelations pourrait jouer un rôle très important dans l’amélioration de la santé et des résultats sportifs des athlètes. En effet, l’exercice peut être reconnu comme un stress. Il induit des modifications de l’équilibre homéostatique qui peuvent à leur tour altérer la réponse immunitaire de l’hôte et donc sa susceptibilité aux maladies. L’adrénaline est la molécule essentielle de tout processus de stress. La technologie des microdamiers, outil majeur d’investigation transcriptomique, permet l’étude de l’expression génique de l’ensemble du génome. Son utilisation devrait donc permettre de mieux caractériser et définir les interrelations entre l’exercice, le stress et la réponse immune. Cette revue recense les interrelations connues entre la réponse immune à un stress adrénergique d’une part et la réponse immune à l’exercice d’autre part. Elle considère en outre la contribution potentielle des microdamiers à une meilleure compréhension des effets d’un stress, et plus particulièrement celui lié à l’exercice, sur l’immunité. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of the innate immunity in the lower respiratory tract in exercising horses
Frellstedt, Linda ULg; Gosset, Philippe; Desmet, Christophe ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 1st Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (2011)

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See detailViral induction of Zac1b through TLR3- and IRF3-dependent pathways
Warzée, Barbara ULg; Mesnil, Claire ULg; Hober, D. et al

in Molecular Immunology (2010), 48(1-3), 119-127

Zinc finger protein regulator of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest (Zac1) is a transcription factor able to induce apoptosis or cell cycle arrest through independent pathways. In spite of the important ... [more ▼]

Zinc finger protein regulator of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest (Zac1) is a transcription factor able to induce apoptosis or cell cycle arrest through independent pathways. In spite of the important potential functions attributed to Zac1, little is known of its physiological regulation and biological function. We discovered that variant Zac1b was expressed in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) treated with polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C)], a synthetic double-stranded RNA. This regulation occurred mainly through Toll-Like Receptor 3 (TLR3)- and Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 (IRF3)-dependent pathways. As TLR3 and IRF3 are central activators of antiviral immunity, we hypothesized that Zac1 may be implicated in antiviral responses. In line with this notion, we observed that Zac1b was expressed in MEFs infected with Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). We also observed that Zac1-deficient MEFs were less sensitive to EMCV-induced cell death than wild-type MEFs. However, Zac1 gene inactivation had no effect on the survival of mice infected with EMCV. In conclusion, this study describes for the first time a transcriptional regulation of Zac1b, induced by synthetic dsRNA and RNA viruses, the functional significance of which remains to be further investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailPolymorphic miRNA-target interactions : A Novel Source of Phenotypic Variation
Georges, Michel ULg; Clop, Alex; Marcq, Fabienne ULg et al

in Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology (2006, June), 71

Studying the muscular hypertrophy of Texel sheep by forward genetics, we have identified an A-to-G transition in the 3'UTRof the GDF8 gene that reveals an illegitimate target site for microRNAs miR-1 and ... [more ▼]

Studying the muscular hypertrophy of Texel sheep by forward genetics, we have identified an A-to-G transition in the 3'UTRof the GDF8 gene that reveals an illegitimate target site for microRNAs miR-1 and miR-206 that are highly expressed in skeletal muscle. This causes the down-regulation of this muscle-specific chalone and hence contributes to the muscular hypertrophyof Texel sheep. We demonstrate that polymorphisms which alter the content of putative miRNA target sites are commonin human and mice, and provide evidence that both conserved and nonconserved target sites are selectively constrained. Wespeculate that these polymorphisms might be important mediators of phenotypic variation including disease. To facilitatestudies along those lines, we have constructed a database (www.patrocles.org) listing putative polymorphic microRNA–targetinteractions. [less ▲]

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