References of "Pirotte, Sophie"
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See detailHistone deacetylase 5 is a regulator of S phase progression
Peixoto, Paul ULg; Pirotte, Sophie ULg; Matheus, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2011, February 05)

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See detailDentin Matrix Protein 1 induces membrane expression of VE-cadherin on endothelial cells and inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis by blocking VEGFR-2 phosphorylation.
Pirotte, Sophie ULg; Lamour, Virginie ULg; Lambert, Vincent ULg et al

in Blood (2011), 117(8), 2515-26

Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a member of the Small Integrin-Binding LIgand N-linked Glycoproteins (SIBLINGs) family, a group of proteins initially described as mineralized extracellular matrices ... [more ▼]

Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a member of the Small Integrin-Binding LIgand N-linked Glycoproteins (SIBLINGs) family, a group of proteins initially described as mineralized extracellular matrices components. More recently, SIBLINGs have been implicated in several key steps of cancer progression, including angiogenesis. Although pro-angiogenic activities have been demonstrated for two SIBLINGs, the role of DMP1 in angiogenesis has not been addressed yet. We demonstrated that this extracellular matrix protein induced the expression of VE-cadherin, a key regulator of intercellular junctions and contact inhibition of growth of endothelial cells that is also known to modulate VEGFR-2 activity, the major high affinity receptor for VEGF. DMP1 induced VE-cadherin and p27(Kip1) expression followed by cell cycle arrest in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in a CD44-dependent manner. VEGF-induced proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis responses were specifically blocked upon DMP1 pre-treatment of HUVEC. Indeed, subsequently to VE-cadherin induction, DMP1 inhibited VEGFR-2 phosphorylation and Src-mediated signaling. However, DMP1 did not interfere with bFGF-induced angiogenesis. In vivo, DMP1 significantly reduced laser-induced choroidal neovascularization lesions and tumor-associated angiogenesis. These data enable us to put DMP1 on the angiogenic chessboard for the first time and to identify this protein as a new specific inhibitor of VEGF-induced angiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailHDAC4 represses p21(WAF1/Cip1) expression in human cancer cells through a Sp1-dependent, p53-independent mechanism.
Mottet, Denis ULg; Pirotte, Sophie ULg; Lamour, Virginie ULg et al

in Oncogene (2009), 28(2), 243-56

Cancer cells have complex, unique characteristics that distinguish them from normal cells, such as increased growth rates and evasion of anti-proliferative signals. Global inhibition of class I and II ... [more ▼]

Cancer cells have complex, unique characteristics that distinguish them from normal cells, such as increased growth rates and evasion of anti-proliferative signals. Global inhibition of class I and II histone deacetylases (HDACs) stops cancer cell proliferation in vitro and has proven effective against cancer in clinical trials, at least in part, through transcriptional reactivation of the p21(WAF1/Cip1)gene. The HDACs that regulate p21(WAF1/Cip1) are not fully identified. Using small interfering RNAs, we found that HDAC4 participates in the repression of p21(WAF1/Cip1) through Sp1/Sp3-, but not p53-binding sites. HDAC4 interacts with Sp1, binds and reduces histone H3 acetylation at the Sp1/Sp3 binding site-rich p21(WAF1/Cip1) proximal promoter, suggesting a key role for Sp1 in HDAC4-mediated repression of p21(WAF1/Cip1). Induction of p21(WAF1/Cip1) mediated by silencing of HDAC4 arrested cancer cell growth in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in an in vivo human glioblastoma model. Thus, HDAC4 could be a useful target for new anti-cancer therapies based on selective inhibition of specific HDACs. [less ▲]

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See detailHistone deacetylase 7 silencing alters endothelial cell migration, a key step in angiogenesis
Mottet, Denis ULg; Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Pirotte, Sophie ULg et al

in Circulation Research (2007), 101(12), 1237-1246

Global inhibition of class I and II histone deacetylases (HDACs) impairs angiogenesis. Herein, we have undertaken the identification of the specific HDAC(s) with activity that is necessary for the ... [more ▼]

Global inhibition of class I and II histone deacetylases (HDACs) impairs angiogenesis. Herein, we have undertaken the identification of the specific HDAC(s) with activity that is necessary for the development of blood vessels. Using small interfering RNAs, we observed that HDAC7 silencing in endothelial cells altered their morphology, their migration, and their capacity to form capillary tube-like structures in vitro but did not affect cell adhesion, proliferation, or apoptosis. Among several factors known to be involved in angiogenesis, platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) and its receptor (PDGFR-beta) were the most upregulated genes following HDAC7 silencing. We demonstrated that their increased expression induced by HDAC7 silencing was partially responsible for the inhibition of endothelial cell migration. In addition, we have also shown that treatment of endothelial cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate resulted in the exportation of HDAC7 out of the nucleus through a protein kinase C/protein kinase D activation pathway and induced, similarly to HDAC7 silencing, an increase in PDGF-B expression, as well as a partial inhibition of endothelial cell migration. Collectively, these data identified HDAC7 as a key modulator of endothelial cell migration and hence angiogenesis, at least in part, by regulating PDGF-B/PDGFR-beta gene expression. Because angiogenesis is required for tumor progression, HDAC7 may represent a rational target for therapeutic intervention against cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailPositive and negative ion mode ESI-MS and MS/MS for studying drug-DNA complexes
Rosu, Frédéric ULg; Pirotte, Sophie ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg et al

in International Journal of Mass Spectrometry (2006), 253(3), 156-171

We report systematic investigation of duplex DNA complexes with minor groove binders (Hoechsts 33258 and 33342, netropsin and DAPI) and intercalators (daunomycin, doxorubicin, actinomycin D, ethidium ... [more ▼]

We report systematic investigation of duplex DNA complexes with minor groove binders (Hoechsts 33258 and 33342, netropsin and DAPI) and intercalators (daunomycin, doxorubicin, actinomycin D, ethidium, cryptolepine, neocryptolepine, m-Amsacrine, proflavine, ellipticine and mitoxantrone) by ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS in the negative ion mode and in the positive ion mode. The apparent solution phase equilibrium binding constants can be determined by measuring relative intensities in the ESI-MS spectrum. While negative ion mode gives reliable results, positive ion mode gives a systematic underestimation of the binding constants and even a complete suppression of the complexes for intercalators lacking functional groups capable of interacting in the grooves. In the second part of the paper we systematically compare MS/MS fragmentation channels and breakdown curves in the positive and the negative modes, and discuss the possible uses and caveats of MS/MS in drug-DNA complexes. In the negative mode, the drugs can be separated in three groups: (1) those that leave the complex with no net charge; (2) those that leave the complex with a negative charge; and (3) those that remain attached on the strands upon dissociation of the duplex due to their positive charge. In the positive ion mode, all complexes fragment via the loss of protonated drug. Information on the stabilization of the complex by drug-DNA noncovalent interactions can be obtained straightforwardly only in the case of neutral drug loss. In all other cases, proton affinity (in the positive ion mode), gas-phase basicity (in the negative ion mode) and coulombic repulsion are the major factors influencing the fragmentation channel and the dissociation kinetics. [less ▲]

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