References of "Pirard, Eric"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailIs Geometallurgy Teachable? A challenge for the new Erasmus Mundus EMerald
Pirard, Eric ULg

Conference (2014, September 05)

designate any kind of advanced ore characterisation prior to mineral processing operations while in fact it should clearly refer to a multidisciplinary integration of geological, mining, metallurgical ... [more ▼]

designate any kind of advanced ore characterisation prior to mineral processing operations while in fact it should clearly refer to a multidisciplinary integration of geological, mining, metallurgical, environmental and economic information into a single orebody model. In order to instil the best available geometallurgical practices in the professional world, it seems essential to break the traditional cleavages among disciplines and educate a new generation of engineers. The Erasmus Mundus EMerald “Master in Georesources Engineering” program initiated by four European universities under the coordination of University of Liege, has been designed to exactly tackle this challenge. It is not surprising that this program has been set up by universities having a long tradition in mixing a double perspective of geology and engineering (Nancy; Lulea; Liege and Freiberg). Geometallurgy requires both an excellent understanding of the natural variability and complexity of an ore and a comprehensive overview of the techniques available to extract and concentrate any valuable material. The course program has been designed to achieve a right balance between knowledge of mineral resources (geology, resource characterisation, reserve estimation, modelling) and processing (comminution, preconcentration, leaching, waste disposal,...). It also includes a broader view on life cycle analysis and urban mining. A series of professional seminars, suggested by an industrial advisory board, shed light on strategic issues, economic and environmental challenges, corporate social responsibilities, etc. Mobility and multicultural experience is an added-value of the Erasmus Mundus experience which definitely contributes to breeding engineers for tomorrow. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailMineralogy of fine particles in slurry from multispectral imaging
Leroy, Sophie ULg; Dislaire, Godefroid ULg; Barnabé, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (2014, September 02)

Quantitative mineralogy of fine particles in slurry from multispectral imaging Sophie Leroy, Godefroid Dislaire, Pierre Barnabé and Eric Pirard Mineral processing especially in its final stages relies ... [more ▼]

Quantitative mineralogy of fine particles in slurry from multispectral imaging Sophie Leroy, Godefroid Dislaire, Pierre Barnabé and Eric Pirard Mineral processing especially in its final stages relies heavily on the differential behavior of particles in pulps. In order to monitor hydrocyclones and flotation cells in almost real time, it is important to develop at line particle characterization providing information on particle distribution but also mineralogy. A sampling device has been elaborated based on a flow cell with variable wall spacing linked to a high pressure peristaltic pump. This setup allows for dispersion and dilution of the mineral slurry into the cell. Depending on the ore or gangue minerals to be controlled, particles can be imaged either in diffuse reflectance or in transmittance mode. A simple multispectral imaging module has been designed to acquire images at eight different wavelengths. The design is based on a series of dichroic filters thereby avoiding any moving part and enabling a very fast acquisition of multispectral images. Imaging artifacts due, among others, to specular reflectance from the glass window are minimized. Multispectral classification is used to outline particles appearing in the field of view and to qualify their main mineral component. In particular, areas reflecting a meaningful and discriminative spectrum are identified and compared to a multispectral database. The database is continuously enriched through testing of pure mineral particles under similar pulp conditions (dilution, grain size,…). Results of final classification are compared to the modal analysis obtained from polished blocks and conventional reflected light microscopy. The technology developed in this work sets the basis for at line monitoring of ore slurries with reasonably simple mineralogy. Extension of the spectral range is being considered for future developments. [less ▲]

Full Text
See detailFrom geometallurgy to ecometallurgy:Building mines for the future
Pirard, Eric ULg

Conference (2014, September 02)

geometallurgy will become the central pivot of a successful mining operation. Recently, Europe has awakened from a long period of lethargy in the raw materials sector. A series of important initiatives ... [more ▼]

geometallurgy will become the central pivot of a successful mining operation. Recently, Europe has awakened from a long period of lethargy in the raw materials sector. A series of important initiatives inspired by the European Innovation Partnership (EIP) have paved the way for more intense cooperation between industry, research centres and universities. Among these, the establishment of a Knowledge Innovation Community (KIC) in 2015 will definitely boost innovation and education in the sector. Interestingly, EIP addresses the whole value chain and considers mining, recycling and substitution as essential pillars of the raw materials policy. This vision strengthens the role of geometallurgy but also brings up the need for a close dialogue between mineralogists, metallurgists and product designers. Microelectronics and nanotechnologies are ubiquitous in our technologies and have greatly improved their functionality, but they have also made recycling and efficient recovery of metals a tough technical challenge. Our urban mines formed by the accumulation of end-of-life products should be scrutinized from now on using an ecometallurgical approach whereby important questions should be addressed such as: 1. Metal concentrations: Is the metal grade high enough to pay for recycling? Does the manufacturer help to maintain grades above a technological cut-off? 2. Metal speciation: Under which form (alloy, salt, organic compound,…) is the metal present? Is there a processing technology available to separate these species? 3. Metal paragenesis: What are the metal assemblages found in the product? Will it be feasible to separate those metals and at what costs? Are there penalty or contaminating elements associated? 4. Textural assemblage: How will the product behave during dismantling? Is it realistic to liberate a given component? What comminution strategy will be needed to achieve phase liberation? 5. Reserve estimation: What are the tonnages expected for this kind of product? Can selective collection be organised? 6. Homogeneity: What will the next generation of products look like? Should one expect strong differences in concentration, speciation, paragenesis, etc.? Will this kind of product be blended with others during collection? How will this impact on downstream recycling? Ecometallurgy, as introduced here, is essentially about establishing a dialogue with product designers and material scientists to make sure that, once unearthed, metals will remain easily and sustainably available for the future generations. Geologists and mineralogists, even though generally kept away from the synthetic materials, could greatly contribute to this progress by bringing their expertise in dealing with complex and variable orebodies of the future. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImaging and understanding of iron ore granulation using X-ray mictrotomography
Evrard, Maxime ULg; Contreras, Rafael; Pirard, Eric ULg

Conference (2014, September)

Imaging and understanding of iron ore granulation using X-ray microtomography. Evrard M., Contreras R., Pirard E. Most iron ores cannot be directly fed into blast furnaces because their particle size ... [more ▼]

Imaging and understanding of iron ore granulation using X-ray microtomography. Evrard M., Contreras R., Pirard E. Most iron ores cannot be directly fed into blast furnaces because their particle size distribution will negatively impact the blast furnace permeability and hence the overall efficiency of the ore reduction process. The finest fraction (typ. < 6.3 mm) has to undergo a sintering process, wherein a mixture of iron ore, coke and flux (limestone, olivine,…) is heated, partially molten and transformed into pieces of sintered material with adequate size, porosity and strength characteristics to be fed into the blast furnace. The preparation of an adequate mixture involves a granulation process which is the subject of this study. Sintering and hence granulation of iron ores, is particularly important in Europe where iron ores show a downward trend in quality (finer particles, broader size range, lower grades with higher variability). In addition an increasing fraction of non-sintered material (return fines) is being added to the mix to optimize the resource efficiency while maintaining sinter quality. For most practitioners, microgranules (or micropellets) are considered as being composed of a nucleus (a particle in the range of 1 to 2 mm) surrounded by layers of the finest ore particles (typically the < 250 µm fraction). A series of experiments and 3D imaging tests have been performed in this study to better understand the granulation mechanisms. Microgranules are formed by mixing iron ore with water in a small rotating drum. Several parameters can be tuned during the granulation process: size and proportion of nucleating particles, size and proportion of fines, water addition, rotating speed, total duration,… Simple experiments using a single ore type (dominantly goethitic or hematitic) and water additions have been carried out systematically to better understand the kinetics of granulation. X-ray microtomography and subsequent 3D image analysis is used to identify and quantify the number of nuclei (when present), to measure the porosity and identify layering or cracks in the microgranule. Compared to previous studies on iron ore pellets (Farber et al. 2002; Shatokha et al. 2009; Shatokha et al. 2010), this work focuses on imaging prior to sintering. It also uses higher resolution micro-CT and definitely brings a better insight into granulation as compared to data from 2D imaging of polished blocks: less artefacts in apparent porosity due to sample preparation; good discrimination among components of the granule; clear identification of the nuclei; etc. This work is part of a larger European project (IMSIMI - Improved Sintering Mix) aiming at an optimal use of challenging input materials through carefully monitored preparation phases (mixing, granulation, etc.) and better understanding of their impact on the sintering process. Farber L., Tardos G., Michaels JN.,2002. Use of X-ray tomograzphy to study the porosity and morphology of granules. Powder Technology vol. 132, p 57-63. Shatokha V., Korobeynikov I., Maire E., Adrien J., 2009. Application of 3D X-ray tomography to investigation of structure of sinter mixture granules. Ironmaking and Steelmaking, vol. 36 (6), p 416-420. Shatokha V., Korobeynikov I., Maire E., Gremillard L., Adrien J.,2010. Iron ore sinter porosity characterisation with application of 3D X-ray tomography. Ironmaking and Steelmaking, vol. 37(5), p313-319. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailSustainable Resource Availability : Ge, Ni, Al three contrasting stories
Pirard, Eric ULg

Conference (2014, May)

The sustainable availability of raw materials used in manufacturing advanced products is a question that consumers will raise more and more in the future. In order to answer this legitimate request it is ... [more ▼]

The sustainable availability of raw materials used in manufacturing advanced products is a question that consumers will raise more and more in the future. In order to answer this legitimate request it is mandatory to define characterization factors capable of taking into account the geological scarcity of an element but also the social and environmental impact of its exploitation and beneficiation. Recent studies (Vieira et al. 2012; Swart el al. 2013) have focused on decreasing ore grades as rough indicators, but clearly such indicators can be severely biased by breakthrough innovations in mining technologies as well as by high metal prices generated by increasing demand. In this paper, we will briefly review three metals that could technically be extracted from very different social and natural environments: Germanium is nowadays mainly a byproduct of coal burnt in China, but could as well be gained from alternative sources such as zinc sulfides. Aluminium is produced from bauxite with Gallium as a byproduct but could technically be extracted from alternative resources such as regionally available clays. Finally, the world nickel production follows two very different processing routes starting either from silicates (laterite deposits) or from sulfides (ultramafic magmas). By comparing the geological; environmental and social impact of mining operations for these three metals, we will try to show what is hidden behind simple ore grades and what indicators should be taken into account in a more complex analysis of sustainable availability. The intention is to build a geographical information system (GIS) of mineral resources and mining operations to help product manufacturers in properly selecting their raw materials providers. Vieira, M.D.M., Goedkoop, M.J., Storm, P. and Huijbregts, M.A.J., 2012, Ore grade decrease as a life cycle impact indicator for metal scarcity : The case of copper. Environ. Sci. Technol. 46, 12772-12778 Swart, P. and Dewulf, J., 2013, Quantifying the impacts of primary metal resource use in life cycle assessment based on recent mining data. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 73, 180-187. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailPropos sur le Zinc
Pirard, Eric ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCharacterization of Particle Damage and Surface Exposure of a Copper Ore Processed by Jaw Crusher, HPGR and Electro-dynamic Fragmentation
Da Fonseca Martins Gomes, Otavio ULg; Monteiro de Oliveira, Debora; Santos Sobral, Luis Gonzaga et al

in Carpenter, John; Bai, Chenguang; Hwang, Jiann-Yang (Eds.) Characterization of Minerals, Metals, and Materials 2014 (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLa tablette de Mendeleïev
Pirard, Eric ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2013)

De l’Age de la Pierre à l’Age du Lithium, nous n’avons eu de cesse de perfectionner nos technologies. Progressant dans la découverte et la compréhension de notre environnement, nous nous sommes mis à ... [more ▼]

De l’Age de la Pierre à l’Age du Lithium, nous n’avons eu de cesse de perfectionner nos technologies. Progressant dans la découverte et la compréhension de notre environnement, nous nous sommes mis à exploiter toutes les ressources naturelles disponibles. Aujourd’hui, il n’y a pratiquement aucun élément du tableau de Mendeleïev qui ne trouve son champ d’application spécifique : du lithium dans les batteries à l’indium dans les écrans en passant par le tantale dans les capacités. Baignant quotidiennement dans un tel univers d’abondance, nous en oublions d’où proviennent ces ressources et nous ignorons souvent que des dizaines de mines ont dû être ouvertes pour assouvir notre besoin de consommation. Depuis que la Chine en 2009 a menacé de ne plus exporter ses fameuses terres rares, l’Europe s’inquiète au plus haut point de la dépendance de son industrie vis-à-vis de matières premières devenues critiques. Pour l’Europe, cela signifie concrètement qu’il est temps de relancer la prospection du sous-sol et de développer une culture du recyclage intelligente et écologique. Au travers de quelques exemples choisis, cet exposé présentera l’évolution des technologies et la nature des matières premières utilisées. Par la nature des exemples et l’accent mis sur le recyclage, cette conférence vient en complément de celle consacrée à « Ressources dans le Rouge pour les Energies Vertes ? » qui est disponible en PodCast sur le site http://www.reflexions.ulg.ac.be [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailTerres rares et métaux critiques. Pénurie ou incurie ?
Pirard, Eric ULg

Scientific conference (2013, November 06)

De l’Âge de la Pierre à l’Âge du Lithium, nous n’avons eu de cesse de perfectionner nos technologies. Progressant dans la découverte et la compréhension de notre environnement, nous nous sommes mis à ... [more ▼]

De l’Âge de la Pierre à l’Âge du Lithium, nous n’avons eu de cesse de perfectionner nos technologies. Progressant dans la découverte et la compréhension de notre environnement, nous nous sommes mis à exploiter toutes les ressources naturelles disponibles. Aujourd’hui, il n’y a pratiquement aucun élément du tableau de Mendeleïev qui ne trouve son champ d’application spécifique : du lithium dans les batteries à l’indium dans les écrans en passant par le tantale dans les capacités. Baignant quotidiennement dans un tel univers d’abondance, nous en oublions d’où proviennent ces ressources. Nous avons refoulé cette question au plus profond de nous-mêmes et avons poussé le syndrome NIMBY (not in my backyard) jusqu’à atteindre le NIMYCON (not in my continent). Depuis quelques années, l’Europe vit un réveil brutal. Elle réalise qu’elle ne produit que 3 % des métaux alors qu’elle en consomme plus de 20 %. Elle réalise que toute son industrie est dépendante de pays émergents qui ont l’ambition de développer un tissu industriel puissant sur base de leur accès aux ressources. L’Europe serait-elle un continent maudit ? Aurait-elle épuisé ses ressources ? Est-elle condamnée à dépendre de pays tiers pour poursuivre sa fuite en avant vers les « hautes technologies  » ? Nullement, mais il est évident qu’il n’y aura pas de ré-industrialisation sans une réflexion sur les matières premières. Le mot d’ordre aujourd’hui est Resource Efficiency. Certains traduisent cela par la nécessité de mettre au point des nouveaux matériaux moins gourmands en matières premières ou évitant l’utilisation d’éléments dits « critiques ». Mais en réalité, dans un monde avide de technologies qui voit le nombre de consommateurs croître sensiblement, il faudra nécessairement ouvrir de nouvelles mines et veiller à ne plus disperser dans l’environnement les métaux que nous en aurons laborieusement extraits. Pour l’Europe, cela signifie concrètement qu’il est temps de relancer la prospection du sous-sol et de développer une culture du recyclage intelligente et écologique. Il y a là un champ d’opportunités à saisir pour l’innovation et le développement de technologies qui sont restées trop longtemps dans l’ombre! Le Resource Efficiency c’est aussi extraire les métaux des minerais et des déchets électriques et électroniques en utilisant des procédés moins gourmands en énergie, en eau et en matière. Au travers de quelques exemples choisis, cet exposé présentera l’évolution des technologies et la nature des matières premières utilisées. Partant de la géochimie d’un simple jardin de banlieue, il introduira le concept de gisement qui est indispensable à une bonne compréhension des ressources et des réserves que recèle encore notre sous-sol. Suscitant la réflexion sur la nécessité de maintenir une industrie extractive, cette présentation analysera aussi les difficultés tant sociologiques que technologiques à mener à bien un recyclage efficace des ressources. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEFFECT OF RAW MATERIAL PROPERTIES ON THE KINETICS OF IRON ORES GRANULATION
Jaimes Contreras, Rafael Antonio ULg; van Loo, Fréderic; Douce, Jean-François et al

Poster (2013, June 26)

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (20 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEFFECT OF RAW MATERIAL PROPERTIES ON THE KINETICS OF IRON ORES GRANULATION
Jaimes Contreras, Rafael Antonio ULg; van Loo, Fréderic; Douce, Jean-François et al

Conference (2013, June 26)

The current study is focused on the iron ores granulation process in a laboratory-scale batch drum granulator using water as a binder, and on the investigation of the influence of raw material properties ... [more ▼]

The current study is focused on the iron ores granulation process in a laboratory-scale batch drum granulator using water as a binder, and on the investigation of the influence of raw material properties (morphology and wettability of the primary particles) on its kinetics. Nowadays processing of iron ores often requires a modification of particle size by means of granulation in order to improve further processability. A comparison of the granulation behaviour of three types of iron ores (magnetite, hematite and goethite) has been carried out. The wettability of the powders has been characterised by contact angle measurement. The results confirm the hydrophobic and hydrophilic characters of magnetite and goethite respectively. The granulation kinetics (evolution of particle size distribution as a function of time) of each type of iron ores was measured. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detailReinventing Docimasy
Pirard, Eric ULg

Scientific conference (2013, May 23)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (11 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLa valse des métaux critiques - Où sont les métaux pour les technologies du futur ?
Pirard, Eric ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2013)

De l’Age de la Pierre à l’Age du Lithium, nous n’avons eu de cesse de perfectionner nos technologies. Progressant dans la découverte et la compréhension de notre environnement, nous nous sommes mis à ... [more ▼]

De l’Age de la Pierre à l’Age du Lithium, nous n’avons eu de cesse de perfectionner nos technologies. Progressant dans la découverte et la compréhension de notre environnement, nous nous sommes mis à exploiter toutes les ressources naturelles disponibles. Aujourd’hui, il n’y a pratiquement aucun élément du tableau de Mendeleïev qui ne trouve son champ d’application spécifique : du lithium dans les batteries à l’indium dans les écrans en passant par le tantale dans les capacités. Baignant quotidiennement dans un tel univers d’abondance, nous en oublions d’où proviennent ces ressources. Nous avons refoulé cette question au plus profond de nous-mêmes et avons poussé le syndrome NIMBY (not in my backyard) jusqu’à atteindre le NIMYCON (not in my continent). Depuis quelques années, l’Europe vit un réveil brutal. Elle réalise qu’elle ne produit que 3 % des métaux alors qu’elle en consomme plus de 20 %. Elle réalise que toute son industrie est dépendante de pays émergents qui ont l’ambition de développer un tissu industriel puissant sur base de leur accès aux ressources. L’Europe serait-elle un continent maudit ? Aurait-elle épuisé ses ressources ? Est-elle condamnée à dépendre de pays tiers pour poursuivre sa fuite en avant vers les « hautes technologies ? Nullement, mais il est évident qu’il n’y aura pas de ré-industrialisation sans une réflexion sur les matières premières. Le mot d’ordre aujourd’hui est Resource Efficiency. Certains traduisent cela par la nécessité de mettre au point des nouveaux matériaux moins gourmands en matières premières ou évitant l’utilisation d’éléments dits « critiques ». Mais en réalité, dans un monde avide de technologies qui voit le nombre de consommateurs croître sensiblement, il faudra nécessairement ouvrir de nouvelles mines et veiller à ne plus disperser dans l’environnement les métaux que nous en aurons laborieusement extraits. Pour l’Europe, cela signifie concrètement qu’il est temps de relancer la prospection du sous-sol et de développer une culture du recyclage intelligente et écologique. Il y a là un champ d’opportunités à saisir pour l’innovation et le développement de technologies qui sont restées trop longtemps dans l’ombre! Le Resource Efficiency c’est aussi extraire les métaux des minerais et des déchets électriques et électroniques en utilisant des procédés moins gourmands en énergie, en eau et en matière. Au travers de quelques exemples choisis, cet exposé présentera l’évolution des technologies et la nature des matières premières utilisées. Partant de la géochimie d’un simple jardin de banlieue, il introduira le concept de gisement qui est indispensable à une bonne compréhension des ressources et des réserves que recèle encore notre sous-sol. Suscitant la réflexion sur la nécessité de maintenir une industrie extractive, cette présentation analysera aussi les difficultés tant sociologiques que technologiques à mener à bien un recyclage efficace des ressources. Par la nature des exemples et l’accent mis sur le recyclage, cette conférence vient en complément de celle consacrée à « Ressources dans le Rouge pour les Technologies Vertes ? » qui est disponible en PodCast sur le site http://www.reflexions.ulg.ac.be (rubrique Décryptage). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (12 ULg)
Full Text
See detailTracking of critical minerals/elements using multispectral quantitative analysis: the case of Chelopech (Bulgaria)
Evrard, Maxime ULg; Pirard, Eric ULg

in Fourth International Symposium: Mineral resources and Mine development (2013, May)

The Chelopech gold-copper mine is localized in the western part of Bulgaria and is one of the largest gold producer in Europe. The most of extracted copper in Chelopech Mining come from arseniate ... [more ▼]

The Chelopech gold-copper mine is localized in the western part of Bulgaria and is one of the largest gold producer in Europe. The most of extracted copper in Chelopech Mining come from arseniate sulfosalts (enargite and tennantite) but also sulphides such as bornite, chalcopyrite and covellite. Gold, silver and critical elements (Ge, Te and Se) are associated with this mineralization but only gold and silver are recovered. An image processing method is applied on different flotation plant samples: ore after milling, tailings 1; tailings 2, total tailings and concentrate. Polished sections made with these samples are analyzed in order to quantify the mineral amounts in each sample. The purpose of this quantitative analysis is to know the nature and proportions of mineral phases at each stage of the process. This study allow to know in which forms copper, arsenic and trace elements are present in the different samples and to track them during the different stages, which is very relevant information in order to improve ore treatment and tailings management. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of particle shape on size distribution measurements by 3D and 2D image analyses and laser diffraction
Califice, Arnaud ULg; Michel, Frédéric ULg; Dislaire, Godefroid ULg et al

in Powder Technology (2013), 237

This paper highlights the fact that particle size distribution (PSD) is not unique for the same product, and is dependent on the chosen measurement technique, especially for asymmetric shapes. Laser ... [more ▼]

This paper highlights the fact that particle size distribution (PSD) is not unique for the same product, and is dependent on the chosen measurement technique, especially for asymmetric shapes. Laser diffraction and 2D image analysis are commonly used PSD measurement techniques. However, the resultsmay not be representative of the true physical dimensions of the particles. The influence of particle shape on PSD results obtained from 2D/3D image analysis and laser diffraction was investigated. Two metallic powders presenting extreme shape properties (round and elongated particles) were analyzed, as well as a blend of the two pure products. 2D image analysis and laser diffraction results were compared to 3D image analysis (measuring the true particle size). This paper compares the PSD results obtained from the three methods. Some commonly used size parameters in image analysis software did not give meaningful results in regard of the true physical dimensions of the particles. The existence of the two populations (products with extremely different shape and size characteristics) could not be identified with such size parameters, and laser diffraction also performed poorly. The PSD obtained from more precise size parameters (image analysis) better corresponded to the true dimensions of the particles. This study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of particle size analysis techniques when studying products presenting diverse particle shapes, and points out that caution is required in the choice of the size parameters, and in the interpretation of PSD results. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (15 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCharacterization of material for cement production in Mbuji-Mayi area (DR Congo)
Matamba Jibikila, Raphaël ULg; Pirard, Eric ULg

in ACCTA johannesburg 2013 (2013)

Although the City of Mbuji-Mayi (DR Congo) is rich in limestone and clay deposits, cement and other building materials are still being imported sometimes by plane from Kinshasa, Zambia and Tanzania. A ... [more ▼]

Although the City of Mbuji-Mayi (DR Congo) is rich in limestone and clay deposits, cement and other building materials are still being imported sometimes by plane from Kinshasa, Zambia and Tanzania. A consequence of this situation is low consumption of cement and concrete (less than 1kg per capita) and a lack of modern and sustainable infrastructures. Our study provides a qualitative assessment of all cement raw materials available in the region, including limestone and clay in order to produce hydraulic binder with optimized technical and environmental performances. Chemical and mineralogical characterizations were done using XRF spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermal analysis, electron microscopy, and mechanical characterizations are planned to assess the performance of the concrete and mortar manufactured with the binder produced. Finally, the ultimate goal is to produce a local hydraulic binder whose physical and mechanical characteristics are similar to those of Portland cement, but whose production is expected to consume less energy and emit less CO2. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailOù sont les métaux pour les technologies du futur?
Pirard, Eric ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 109 (31 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAutomated characterisation of intergrowth textures in mineral particles. A case study
Perez-Barnuevo, Laura; Pirard, Eric ULg; Castroviejo, Ricardo

in Minerals Engineering (2013)

The characterisation of mineral texture has been a major concern for process mineralogists, as liberation characteristics of the ores are intimately related to the mineralogical texture. While a great ... [more ▼]

The characterisation of mineral texture has been a major concern for process mineralogists, as liberation characteristics of the ores are intimately related to the mineralogical texture. While a great effort has been done to automatically characterise texture in unbroken ores, the characterisation of textural attributes in mineral particles is usually descriptive. However, the quantitative characterisation of texture in mineral particles is essential to improve and predict the performance of minerallurgical processes (i.e. all the processes involved in the liberation and separation of the mineral of interest) and to achieve a more accurate geometallurgical model. Driven by this necessity of achieving a more complete characterisation of textural attributes in mineral particles, a methodology has been recently developed to automatically characterise the type of intergrowth between mineral phases within particles by means of digital image analysis. In this methodology, a set of minerallurgical indices has been developed to quantify different mineralogical features and to identify the intergrowth pattern by discriminant analysis. The paper shows the application of the methodology to the textural characterisation of chalcopyrite in the rougher concentrate of the Kansanshi copper mine (Zambia). In this sample, the variety of intergrowth patterns of chalcopyrite with the other minerals has been used to illustrate the methodology. The results obtained show that the method identifies the intergrowth type and provides quantitative information to achieve a complete and detailed mineralogical characterisation. Therefore, the use of this methodology as a routinely tool in automated mineralogy would contribute to a better understanding of the ore behaviour during liberation and separation processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (15 ULg)
Full Text
See detailOnline monitoring of the interaction of balls and slurry with the Sensomag ®
Köttgen, Axel; Leroy, Sophie ULg; Bastin, David ULg et al

Poster (2012, December 10)

Presentation of Optimag Project results. Optimag aims to optimize the ball milling operations through the use of an embarked sensor, called the Sensomag, and developed by Magotteaux to monitor in real ... [more ▼]

Presentation of Optimag Project results. Optimag aims to optimize the ball milling operations through the use of an embarked sensor, called the Sensomag, and developed by Magotteaux to monitor in real time the position of the slurry and the grinding balls. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTEXTURAL DESCRIPTORS FOR MULTIPHASIC ORE PARTICLES
Pérez Barnuevo, Laura ULg; Pirard, Eric ULg; Castroviejo, Ricardo

in Image Analysis and Stereology (2012), 31(3),

Monitoring of mineral processing circuits by means of particle liberation analysis through quantitative image analysis has become a routine technique within the last decades. Usually, liberation indices ... [more ▼]

Monitoring of mineral processing circuits by means of particle liberation analysis through quantitative image analysis has become a routine technique within the last decades. Usually, liberation indices are computed as weight proportions, which is not informative enough when complex texture ores are treated by flotation. In these cases, liberation has to be computed as phase surface exposed to reactants, and textural relationships between minerals have to be characterized to determine the possibility of increasing exposure. In this paper, some indices to achieve a complete texture characterization have been developed in terms of 2D phase contact and mineral surfaces exposure. Indices suggested by other authors are also compared. The response of this set of parameters against textural changes has been explored on simple synthetic textures ranging from single to multiple inclusions and single to multiple veins and their ability to discriminate between different textural features is analyzed over real mineral particles with known internal structure. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (11 ULg)