References of "Phillips, Christophe"
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See detailPET imaging analysis using a parcelation approach and multiple kernel classification
Segovia-Román, Fermín ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg

in International Workshop on Pattern Recognition in Neuroimaging, Tübingen 4-6 June 2014 (in press)

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive medical imaging modality that provides information about physiological processes. Due to its ability to measure the brain metabolism, it is widely used ... [more ▼]

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive medical imaging modality that provides information about physiological processes. Due to its ability to measure the brain metabolism, it is widely used to assist the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) of Parkinsonism. In order to avoid the subjectivity inherent to the visual exploration of the images, several computer systems to analyze PET data were developed during the last years. However, dealing with the huge amount of information provided by PET imaging is still a challenge. In this work we present a novel methodology to analyze PET data that improves the automatic differentiation between controls and AD patients. First the images are divided into small regions or parcels, defined either anatomically, geometrically or randomly. Secondly, the accuray of each single region is estimated using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier and a cross-validation approach. Finally, all the regions are assessed together using multiple kernel SVM with a kernel per region. The classifier is built so that the most discriminative regions have more weight in the final decision. This method was evaluated using a PET dataset that contained images from healthy controls and AD patients. The classification results obtained with the proposed approach outperformed two recently reported computer systems based on Principal Component Analysis and Independent Component Analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailPETRA: Multivariate analyses for neuroimaging data
Segovia-Román, Fermín ULg; Álvarez Illán, Ignacio; Salas-Gonzalez, Diego et al

in Proceeding of 2nd International Work-Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering (in press)

In last years, many research efforts in neurosciences have focused in multivariate approaches based on machine learning as an al- ternative to the use of Statistical Parametric Mapping and the univariate ... [more ▼]

In last years, many research efforts in neurosciences have focused in multivariate approaches based on machine learning as an al- ternative to the use of Statistical Parametric Mapping and the univariate analyses that it provides. However, this relatively new field still lacks of a software framework that completely meets the needs of the scientific community. In this work we present a toolbox designed to facilitate the access to the recent advances in neuroimaging data analysis based on multivariate approaches. The toolbox, written on Matlab, is freely avail- able and implements a Graphical User Interface that allows managing neuroimaging data in an easy way. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of noise correction on intra- and inter-subject variability of quantitative metrics in diffusion kurtosis imaging
André, Elodie ULg; Grinberg, Farida; Farrher, Ezequiel et al

in PLoS ONE (in press)

Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a promising extension of diffusion tensor imaging, giving new insights into the white matter microstructure and providing new biomarkers. Given the rapidly increasing ... [more ▼]

Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a promising extension of diffusion tensor imaging, giving new insights into the white matter microstructure and providing new biomarkers. Given the rapidly increasing number of studies, DKI has a potential to establish itself as a valuable tool in brain diagnostics. However, to become a routine procedure, DKI still needs to be improved in terms of robustness, reliability, and reproducibility. As it requires acquisitions at higher diffusion31 weightings, results are more affected by noise than in diffusion tensor imaging. The lack of standard procedures for post-processing, especially for noise correction, might become a significant obstacle for the use of DKI in clinical routine limiting its application. We considered two noise correction schemes accounting for the noise properties of multichannel phased-array coils, in order to improve the data quality at signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) typical for DKI. The SNR dependence of estimated DKI metrics such as mean kurtosis (MK), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) is investigated for these noise correction approaches in Monte Carlo simulations and in in vivo human studies. The intra-subject reproducibility is investigated in a single subject study by varying the SNR level and SNR spatial distribution. Then the impact of the noise correction on inter-subject variability is evaluated in a homogeneous sample of 25 healthy volunteers. Results show a strong impact of noise correction on the MK estimate, while the estimation of FA and MD was affected to a lesser extent. Both intra- and inter-subject SNR related variability of the MK estimate is considerably reduced after correction for the noise bias, providing more accurate and reproducible measures. In this work, we have proposed a straightforward method that improves accuracy of DKI metrics. This should contribute to standardization of DKI applications in clinical studies and making valuable inferences in group analysis and longitudinal studies. [less ▲]

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See detailPrior light history impacts on higher order cognitive brain function
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Ly, Julien; Meyer, Christelle ULg et al

Conference (2014, June 17)

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See detailThe circadian system sets the temporal organization of basic human neuronal function
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Ly, Julien; Gaggioni, Giulia et al

Conference (2014, June 16)

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See detailBiased binomial assessment of cross-validated estimation of classification accuracies illustrated in diagnosis predictions
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Lesenfants, Damien ULg; Gomez, Francisco et al

in NeuroImage: Clinical (2014), 4

Multivariate classification is used in neuroimaging studies to infer brain activation or in medical applications to infer diagnosis. Their results are often assessed through either a binomial or a ... [more ▼]

Multivariate classification is used in neuroimaging studies to infer brain activation or in medical applications to infer diagnosis. Their results are often assessed through either a binomial or a permutation test. Here, we simulated classification results of generated random data to assess the influence of the cross-validation scheme on the significance of results. Distributions built from classification of random data with crossvalidation did not follow the binomial distribution. The binomial test is therefore not adapted. On the contrary, the permutation test was unaffected by the cross-validation scheme. The influence of the crossvalidation was further illustrated on real-data from a brain–computer interface experiment in patients with disorders of consciousness and from an fMRI study on patients with Parkinson disease. Three out of 16 patients with disorders of consciousness had significant accuracy on binomial testing, but only one showed significant accuracy using permutation testing. In the fMRI experiment, the mental imagery of gait could discriminate significantly between idiopathic Parkinson’s disease patients and healthy subjects according to the permutation test but not according to the binomial test. Hence, binomial testing could lead to biased estimation of significance and false positive or negative results. In our view, permutation testing is thus recommended for clinical application of classification with cross-validation. [less ▲]

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See detailCombining PET images and neuropsychological test data for automatic diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease
Segovia-Román, Fermín ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), 9(2),

In recent years, several approaches to develop computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems for dementia have been proposed. Some of these systems analyze neurological brain images by means of machine learning ... [more ▼]

In recent years, several approaches to develop computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems for dementia have been proposed. Some of these systems analyze neurological brain images by means of machine learning algorithms in order to find the patterns that characterize the disorder, and a few combine several imaging modalities to improve the diagnostic accuracy. However, they usually do not use neuropsychological testing data in that analysis. The purpose of this work is to measure the advantages of using not only neuroimages as data source in CAD systems for dementia but also neuropsychological scores. To this aim, we compared the accuracy rates achieved by systems that use neuropsychological scores beside the imaging data in the classification step and systems that use only one of these data sources. In order to address the small sample size problem and facilitate the data combination, a dimensionality reduction step (implemented using three different algorithms) was also applied on the imaging data. After each image is summarized in a reduced set of image features, the data sources were combined and classified using three different data combination approaches and a Support Vector Machine classifier. That way, by testing different dimensionality reduction methods and several data combination approaches, we aim not only highlighting the advantages of using neuropsychological scores in the classification, but also implementing the most accurate computer system for early dementia detention. The accuracy of the CAD systems were estimated using a database with records from 46 subjects, diagnosed with MCI or AD. A peak accuracy rate of 89% was obtained. In all cases the accuracy achieved using both, neuropsychological scores and imaging data, was substantially higher than the one obtained using only the imaging data. [less ▲]

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See detailMemory Reactivation During Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep Promotes Its Generalization and Integration in Cortical Stores
Sterpenich, Virginie; Schmidt, Christina ULg; Albouy, Genevièvre et al

in Sleep (2014), 37(6), 1061-1075

Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. Here, we tested the influence of memory reactivation during REM sleep on memory performance and brain responses at ... [more ▼]

Memory reactivation appears to be a fundamental process in memory consolidation. Here, we tested the influence of memory reactivation during REM sleep on memory performance and brain responses at retrieval in healthy human participants. Auditory cues were associated with pictures of faces during their encoding. These memory cues delivered during REM sleep enhanced subsequent accurate recollections but also false recognitions. These results suggest that reactivated memories interacted with semantically-related representations, and induced new creative associations, which subsequently reduced the distinction between new and previously encoded exemplars. Cues had no effect if presented during stage 2 sleep, or if they were not associated with faces during encoding. Functional MRI revealed that following exposure to conditioned cues during REM sleep, responses to faces during retrieval were enhanced both in a visual area and in a cortical region of multisensory (auditory-visual) convergence. These results show that reactivating memories during REM sleep enhances cortical responses during retrieval, suggesting the integration of recent memories within cortical circuits, favoring the generalization and schematization of the information. [less ▲]

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See detailBrains creating stories of selves: the neural basis of autobiographical reasoning.
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Cassol, Helena; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (2014), 9

Personal identity critically depends on the creation of stories about the self and one's life. The present study investigates the neural substrates of autobiographical reasoning, a process central to the ... [more ▼]

Personal identity critically depends on the creation of stories about the self and one's life. The present study investigates the neural substrates of autobiographical reasoning, a process central to the construction of such narratives. During fMRI scanning, participants approached a set of personally significant memories in two different ways: on some trials, they remembered the concrete content of the events (autobiographical remembering), whereas on other trials they reflected on the broader meaning and implications of their memories (autobiographical reasoning). Relative to remembering, autobiographical reasoning recruited a left-lateralized network involved in conceptual processing (including the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), inferior frontal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, and angular gyrus). The ventral MPFC-an area that may function to generate personal/affective meaning-was not consistently engaged during autobiographical reasoning across participants but, interestingly, the activity of this region was modulated by individual differences in interest and willingness to engage in self-reflection. These findings support the notion that autobiographical reasoning and the construction of personal narratives go beyond mere remembering in that they require deriving meaning and value from past experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailPhotic memory for executive brain responses
Chellappa*, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Ly*, Julien ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2014), Epub ahead of print

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See detailOn the statistical assessment of small sample classification
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Lesenfants, Damien ULg; Gomez, Francisco et al

Conference (2013, December)

Classifiers start to be used in medical application to infer diagnosis. Their results are assessed through either a binomial or a permutation test. Distributions built from classification of random data ... [more ▼]

Classifiers start to be used in medical application to infer diagnosis. Their results are assessed through either a binomial or a permutation test. Distributions built from classification of random data with cross-validation, did not follow the theoretical binomial distribution, showing that binomial test was not conservative enough. A permutation test is thus recommended. [less ▲]

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See detailAnisotropy preserving DTI processing
Collard, Anne ULg; Bonnabel, Silvère; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in International Journal of Computer Vision (2013)

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See detailChanges in Effective Connectivity by Propofol Sedation
Gomez Jaramillo, Francisco Albeiro ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg; Soddu, Andrea ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(8), 71370

Mechanisms of propofol-induced loss of consciousness remain poorly understood. Recent fMRI studies have shown decreases in functional connectivity during unconsciousness induced by this anesthetic agent ... [more ▼]

Mechanisms of propofol-induced loss of consciousness remain poorly understood. Recent fMRI studies have shown decreases in functional connectivity during unconsciousness induced by this anesthetic agent. Functional connectivity does not provide information of directional changes in the dynamics observed during unconsciousness. The aim of the present study was to investigate, in healthy humans during an auditory task, the changes in effective connectivity resulting from propofol induced loss of consciousness. We used Dynamic Causal Modeling for fMRI (fMRI-DCM) to assess how causal connectivity is influenced by the anesthetic agent in the auditory system. Our results suggest that the dynamic observed in the auditory system during unconsciousness induced by propofol, can result in a mixture of two effects: a local inhibitory connectivity increase and a decrease in the effective connectivity in sensory cortices. [less ▲]

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See detailAltered white matter architecture in BDNF Met carriers
Ziegler, Erik ULg; Foret, Ariane; Mascetti, Laura ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013)

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates the pruning of synaptically-silent axonal arbors. The Met allele of the BDNF gene is associated with a reduction in the neurotrophin's activity-dependent ... [more ▼]

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates the pruning of synaptically-silent axonal arbors. The Met allele of the BDNF gene is associated with a reduction in the neurotrophin's activity-dependent release. We used di ffusion-weighted imaging to construct structural brain networks for 36 healthy subjects with known BDNF genotypes. Through permutation testing we discovered clear di fferences in connection strength between subjects carrying the Met allele and those homozygotic for the Val allele. We trained a Gaussian process classi fier capable of identifying the subjects' allelic group with 86% accuracy and high predictive value. In Met carriers structural connectivity was greatly increased throughout the forebrain, particularly in connections corresponding to the anterior and superior corona radiata as well as corticothalamic and corticospinal projections from the sensorimotor, premotor and prefrontal portions of the internal capsule. Interhemispheric connectivity was also increased via the corpus callosum and anterior commissure, and extremely high connectivity values were found between inferior medial frontal polar regions via the anterior forceps. We propose that the decreased availability of BDNF leads to de cifits in axonal maintenance in carriers of the Met allele, and that this produces mesoscale changes in white matter architecture. [less ▲]

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See detailMultivariate pattern interpretation using PRoNTo
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Rosa, Maria; Rondina, Jane et al

Poster (2013, June)

Recently, machine learning models have been applied to neuroimaging data, allowing to make predictions about a variable of interest based on the pattern of activation or anatomy over a set of voxels. In ... [more ▼]

Recently, machine learning models have been applied to neuroimaging data, allowing to make predictions about a variable of interest based on the pattern of activation or anatomy over a set of voxels. In addition, they might lead to an increased sensitivity to detect the presence of a particular mental representation compared to univariate methods such as the General Linear Model (GLM). Application of these methods made it possible to decode the category of a seen object or the orientation of a striped pattern seen by the subject. They also allowed classification of patients and healthy controls and could therefore be used as a diagnostic tool due to their ability to predict the class of an unseen sample. The main disadvantage of multivariate machine learning models is that local inference with respect to the brain neuroanatomy is complex: although linear models generate weights for each voxel, the model predictions are based on the whole pattern and therefore one cannot threshold the weights to make regional statistical inferences as in univariate analysis. In the present work, we developed a methodology based on a labelled anatomical template (e.g. AAL or Brodmann) to display a smoothed version of the model weights and compute a ranking of the regions according their contribution to the predictive model. This work is distributed in PRoNTo (Pattern Recognition for Neuroimaging Toolbox), a user-friendly toolbox, making machine learning models available to every neuroscientist. [less ▲]

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See detailConnectome-based classification of BDNF Met allele carriers
Ziegler, Erik ULg; Foret, Ariane; Mascetti, Laura ULg et al

Poster (2013, June)

Secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system during neurodevelopment [Huang]. A common human non-synonymous SNIP in the BDNF ... [more ▼]

Secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system during neurodevelopment [Huang]. A common human non-synonymous SNIP in the BDNF gene (Val66Met, rs6265) decreases activity-dependent BDNF release in neurons transfected with the human A allele (Met-BDNF). We reasoned that the persistent differential activity-dependent BDNF release implied by this polymorphism should also be associated with differences in adult brain structure. The study population comprised 36 healthy subjects (aged 18-25): 15 (9 male) were identified as carrying the Met allele (“Met carrier” group) and 21 (9 male) were homozygotes for the Val allele (“Val/Val” group). The groups did not vary significantly in IQ, age nor scores for a battery of psychological tests. A high-resolution T1-weighted image (sMRI), 7 unweighted (b=0) and a set of diffusion-weighted (b=1000) images using 61 non-collinear directional gradients were acquired for each subject. The processing workflow relied on several pieces of software and was developed in Python and Nipype. The sMRIs were segmented using the automated labeling of Freesurfer [Desikan] and further parcellated using the Lausanne2008 atlas into 1015 regions of interest (ROIs) [Cammoun]. DWIs were corrected for image distortions (due to eddy currents) using linear coregistration functions from FSL [Smith]. Fractional anisotropy maps were generated, and a few single-fiber (high FA) voxels were used to estimate the spherical harmonic coefficients (order 8) of the response function from the DWIs [Tournier]. Then orientation distribution functions were obtained at each voxel. Probabilistic tractography was performed throughout the whole brain using seeds from subject-specific white-matter masks and a predefined number of tracts (300,000), see Fig. 1. The tracks were affine-transformed into the subject's structural space with Dipy [Garyfallidis]. Connectome mapping was performed by considering every contact point between each tract and the outlined ROIs (unlike in [Hagmann]): the connectivity matrix was incremented every time a single fiber traversed between any two ROIs. We trained a Gaussian Process Classifier [Rasmussen] (interfaced by PRoNTo [Schrouff]) on these connectivity matrices. The accuracy and generalization ability of the classification were assessed with a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation procedure. With this linear kernel method weights were also obtained indicating the contribution to the classification output (in favor of either genotypic group) of each edge in the network. The same method was employed to discriminate features related to the subjects' gender and genotype for the ADA gene. The classifier was able to discriminate between Val/Val and Met carriers with 86.1% balanced accuracy. The predictive value for the Val/Val and Met carrier groups were 94.4% (p=0.001) and 77.8% (p=0.003), respectively. In Fig. 2 the weights obtained by the classifier are visualized as edges in the brain network. For the classifier trained to identify gender or the subjects' ADA genotype, the global accuracy reached 63.9% (n.s.) and 58.3% (n.s.) respectively. Using high-resolution connectome mapping from normal young healthy human volunteers grouped based on the Met allele of the BNDF gene, we show that the BDNF genotype of an individual can be significantly identified from his structural brain wiring. These differences appear specific to this allele; no such difference could be found for the polymorphism in the ADA gene, or even for gender. We propose that the decreased availability of BDNF leads to deficits in axonal maintenance in Met carriers, and that this produces mesoscale changes in white matter architecture. Acknowledgements: the FNRS, the ULg, the Queen Elisabeth Medical Foundation, the Léon Fredericq Foundation, the Belgian Inter-University Attraction Program, the Welbio program, and the MCITN in Neurophysics (PITN-GA-2009-238593). Cammoun L. et al. (2011), ‘Mapping the human connectome at multiple scales with diffusion spectrum MRI’, J Neuroscience Methods, 203:386–397. Desikan R.S. et al. (2006), ‘An automated labeling system for subdividing the human cerebral cortex on MRI scans into gyral based regions of interest’, Neuroimage, 31:968-980. Hagmann P. et al. (2008), ‘Mapping the structural core of human cerebral cortex’, PLoS Biology, 6:e159 Huang E.J., Reichardt L.F. (2001), ‘Neurotrophins: roles in neuronal development and function’, Annual Review of Neuroscience, 24:677-736. Garyfallidis E. et al. (2011), ‘Dipy - a novel software library for diffusion MR and tractography’, 17th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping. http://nipy.sourceforge.net/dipy/ Rasmussen C.E. (2006), Gaussian processes for machine learning. Schrouff J. et al. (2012), ‘PRoNTo: Pattern Recognition for Neuroimaging Toolbox’, 18th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping. http://www.mlnl.cs.ucl.ac.uk/pronto Smith S.M. et al. (2004), ‘Advances in functional and structural MR image analysis and implementation as FSL’, Neuroimage, 23 Suppl 1:S208-S219. Tournier J.D., et al. (2007), ‘Robust determination of the fibre orientation distribution in diffusion MRI: non-negativity constrained super-resolved spherical deconvolution’, Neuroimage, 35:1459-1472. [less ▲]

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See detailPattern Recognition for Neuroimaging
Phillips, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2013, April 24)

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