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See detailComparison of the value of measurement of serum galactomannan and Aspergillus-specific antibodies in the diagnosis of canine sino-nasal aspergillosis.
Billen, Frédéric ULg; Peeters, Dominique ULg; Peters, I. R. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2009), 133(4), 358-65

Serology is currently used for the diagnosis of canine sino-nasal aspergillosis (SNA). However, the accuracy of serological testing using commercially available, standardized purified antigen preparations ... [more ▼]

Serology is currently used for the diagnosis of canine sino-nasal aspergillosis (SNA). However, the accuracy of serological testing using commercially available, standardized purified antigen preparations of Aspergillus (CAPurAspAg) has only been poorly documented. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of an agar-gel double immunodiffusion (AGDD) test and an anti-Aspergillus IgG ELISA, using CAPurAspAg and the commercially available Platelia test for the detection of serum galactomannan. Sera from 17 dogs with SNA, 18 dogs with a nasal tumour (NT), 11 dogs with lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis (LPR) and 33 control dogs were tested with the 3 methods. AGDD result was positive in 76.5% of dogs with SNA, whereas all sera from dogs with non-fungal nasal disease and control dogs were negative. A positive IgG ELISA result was obtained in 88% of dogs with SNA and in 18% of dogs with LPR. All patients with NT and control dogs had a negative IgG ELISA result. The Platelia test was positive in 24% of dogs with SNA, 11% of dogs with NT, 9% of dogs with LPR and 24% of control dogs. The results of this study suggest that (1) the detection of serum Aspergillus-specific antibodies with AGDD or ELISA, using CAPurAspAg, provides excellent specificity and good sensitivity, (2) the specificity is higher for AGDD (100%) than for ELISA (96.8%) while sensitivity is higher for ELISA (88.2%) than for AGDD (76.5%) and (3) serum galactomannan quantification with the Plateliat test is unreliable for the diagnosis of canine SNA. [less ▲]

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See detailWhole Blood and Tissue Fungal DNA Quantification in the Diagnosis of Canine Sino-Nasal Aspergillosis
Peeters, Dominique ULg; Peters, I. R.; Helps, C. R. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2008), 128(1-2), 194-203

Various combinations of tests are used to confirm the diagnosis of canine sino-nasal aspergillosis (SNA) because false-positive and false-negative results can occur with each test. Therefore, the aim of ... [more ▼]

Various combinations of tests are used to confirm the diagnosis of canine sino-nasal aspergillosis (SNA) because false-positive and false-negative results can occur with each test. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether detection of fungal DNA in blood and nasal tissue samples was of value in the clinical diagnosis of this disease. Four groups were included in the study (dogs with SNA, lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis or nasal neoplasia, and control animals). Real-time PCR assays detecting DNA from all Penicillium and Aspergillus species (PenAsp assay) or species-specific DNA from A. fumigatus, A. terreus, A. flavus and A. niger were applied to whole blood and nasal tissue samples. Results obtained by PCR were compared between the groups. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) for fungal DNA detection were compared with those for alternative diagnostic procedures including histopathology, serology and fungal culture. Significantly more fungal DNA was detected by the PenAsp assay in tissue biopsies from dogs with SNA than in the three other groups. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for this method were 1.00, 0.06, 0.32 and 1.00. A. fumigatus DNA was detected in seven tissue biopsies from dogs with SNA and in one biopsy from a dog with a nasal tumour. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for this diagnostic test were 0.50, 0.97, 0.87 and 0.82. No significant difference was found between the groups with respect to the amount of DNA detected in blood by the PenAsp assay. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for this method were 0.71, 0.24, 0.31 and 0.64. A. fumigatus DNA was detected in the blood of three dogs with SNA and sixteen dogs without SNA. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for this diagnostic tool were 0.21, 0.45, 0.15 and 0.54. Detection of A. fumigatus DNA in nasal tissue had the highest specificity, PPV and NPV but sensitivity of this method was low. Detection of fungal DNA in whole blood was of no value in the diagnosis of SNA. [less ▲]

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