References of "Peterfy, C"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat is the predictive value of MRI for the occurrence of knee replacement surgery in knee osteoarthritis?
Pelletier, J.-P.; Cooper, C.; Peterfy, C. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2013), 72(10), 1594-1604

Knee osteoarthritis is associated with structural changes in the joint. Despite its many drawbacks, radiography is the current standard for evaluating joint structure in trials of potential disease ... [more ▼]

Knee osteoarthritis is associated with structural changes in the joint. Despite its many drawbacks, radiography is the current standard for evaluating joint structure in trials of potential disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs. MRI is a non-invasive alternative that provides comprehensive imaging of the whole joint. Frequently used MRI measurements in knee osteoarthritis are cartilage volume and thickness; others include synovitis, synovial fluid effusions, bone marrow lesions (BML) and meniscal damage. Joint replacement is considered a clinically relevant outcome in knee osteoarthritis; however, its utility in clinical trials is limited. An alternative is virtual knee replacement on the basis of symptoms and structural damage. MRI may prove to be a good alternative to radiography in definitions of knee replacement. One of the MRI parameters that predicts knee replacement is medial compartment cartilage volume/thickness, which correlates with radiographic joint space width, is sensitive to change, and predicts outcomes in a continuous manner. Other MRI parameters include BML and meniscal lesions. MRI appears to be a viable alternative to radiography for the evaluation of structural changes in knee osteoarthritis and prediction of joint replacement. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLongitudinal study of magnetic resonance imaging and standard X-rays to assess disease progression in osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Genant, H.; Kothari, M. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2007), 15(1), 98-103

Objective: To investigate, over 1-year, the relationship between X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Sixty-two osteoarthritic patients ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate, over 1-year, the relationship between X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Sixty-two osteoarthritic patients (46 women) were followed for 1 year. At baseline and after 1 year, volume and thickness of cartilage of the medial tibia, the lateral tibia and the femur were assessed by MRI. A global score from the multi-feature whole-organ MRI scoring system (WORMS) was calculated for each patient at baseline and after 1 year. This score combined individual scores for articular cartilage, osteophytes, bone marrow abnormality, subchondral cysts and bone attrition in 14 locations. It also incorporated scores for the medial and lateral menisci, anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, medial and lateral collateral ligaments and synovial distension. Lateral and medial femorotibial joint space width (JSW) measurements, performed by digital image analysis, were assessed from fixed-flexion, postero-anterior knee radiographs. Results: One-year changes in medial femoro-tibial JSW reach 6.7 (20.5) % and changes in medial cartilage volume and thickness reach 0.4 (16.7) % and 2.1 (11.3) %, respectively. Medial femoro-tibial joint space narrowing (JSN) after 1 year, assessed by radiography, was significantly correlated with a loss of medial tibial cartilage volume (r = 0.25, P = 0.046) and medial tibial cartilage thickness (r = 0.28, P = 0.025), over the same period. We found also a significant correlation between the progression of the WORMS and radiographic medial JSN over 1 year (r = -0.35, P = 0.006). All these results remained statistically significant after adjusting for age, sex and body mass index. Conclusion: This study shows a moderate but significant association between changes in JSW and changes in cartilage volume or thickness in knee joint of osteoarthritic patients. (C) 2006 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOsteoarthritis, magnetic resonance imaging, and biochemical markers: a one year prospective study
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Collette, Julien ULg; Kothari, M. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2006), 65(8), 1050-1054

Objective: To investigate the relation between biochemical markers of bone, cartilage, and synovial remodelling and the structural progression of knee osteoarthritis. Methods: 62 patients of both sexes ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate the relation between biochemical markers of bone, cartilage, and synovial remodelling and the structural progression of knee osteoarthritis. Methods: 62 patients of both sexes with knee osteoarthritis were followed prospectively for one year. From magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI), done at baseline and after one year, the volume and thickness of cartilage of the femur, the medial tibia, and the lateral tibia were assessed. A whole organ magnetic resonance imaging score ( WORMS) of the knee was calculated for each patient at baseline and at the one year visits. This score consists in a validated, semiquantitative scoring system for whole organ assessment of the knee in osteoarthritis using MRI. Biochemical markers ( serum hyaluronic acid, osteocalcin, cartilage glycoprotein 39 ( YKL-40), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein ( COMP), and C-telopeptide of type I collagen ( CTX-I), and urine C-telopeptide of type II collagen ( CTX-II)) were measured at baseline and after three months. Results: Baseline markers were not correlated with one year changes observed in cartilage volume and thickness. However, an increase in CTX-II after three months was significantly correlated with a one year decrease in mean thickness of medial tibial and lateral tibial cartilage. Patients in the highest quartile of three month changes in CTX-II experienced a mean loss of 0.07 ( 0.08) mm of their medial thickness, compared with a mean increase of 0.05 ( 0.19) mm for patients in the lowest quartile ( p = 0.04) Multiple regression analysis showed that high baseline levels of hyaluronic acid are predictive of a worsening in WORMS ( p = 0.004). Conclusions: These results suggest that a single measurement of serum hyaluronic acid or short term changes in urine CTX-II could identify patients at greatest risk of progression of osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLongitudinal study of magnetic resonance imaging and fixed-flexion radiography to assess progression of osteoarthritis of the knee
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kothari, M.; Peterfy, C. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2006, March), 17(Suppl.1), 85

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOne-year progression of knee osteoarthritis: correlations between X-Rays and magnetic resonance imaging changes
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kothari, M.; Zaim, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 46-47

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFemoro-tibial joint space width, assessed by standard X-Ray, is associated with tibial cartilage volume and thickness, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kothari, M.; Zaim, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 46

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailKnee whole-organ MRI score (WORMS) as a surrogate marker for X-ray joint space narrowing
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kothari, M.; Zaim, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2005, March), 16(Suppl.3), 6

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (2 ULg)