References of "Pestieau, Pierre"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUnited but (un)equal: human capital, probability of divorce, and the marriage contract
Cremer, Helmuh; Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Roeder, Kerstin

in Journal of Population Economics (2015), 28

This paper studies how the risk of divorce affects the human capital decisions of a young couple. We consider a setting where complete specialization is optimal with no divorce risk. Couples can self ... [more ▼]

This paper studies how the risk of divorce affects the human capital decisions of a young couple. We consider a setting where complete specialization is optimal with no divorce risk. Couples can self-insure through savings which offers some protection to the uneducated spouse, but at the expense of a distortion. Alternatively, for large divorce probabilities, symmetry in education, where both spouses receive an equal amount of education, may be optimal. This eliminates the risk associated with the lack of education, but reduces the efficiency of education choices. We show that the symmetric allocation will become more attractive as the probability of divorce increases, if risk aversion is high and/or labor supply elasticity is low. However, it is only a “second-best” solution as insurance protection is achieved at the expense of an efficiency loss. Finally, we study how the (economic) use of marriage is affected by the possibility of divorce. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTagging with leisure needs
Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Racionero, Maria

in Social Choice and Welfare (2015)

We study optimal redistributive taxes when individuals differ in two characteristics—earning ability and leisure needs—assumed to be imperfectly correlated. Individuals have private information about ... [more ▼]

We study optimal redistributive taxes when individuals differ in two characteristics—earning ability and leisure needs—assumed to be imperfectly correlated. Individuals have private information about their abilities but needs are observable. With different levels of observable needs the population can be separated into groups and needs may be used as a tag.We first assume that the social planner considers individuals should be compensated for their leisure needs and characterize the optimal redistributive policy, and the extent of compensation for needs, with tagging.We also consider an alternative social objective where individuals are deemed responsible for their needs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTax evasion and social information: an experiment in Belgium, France, and the Netherlands
Pestieau, Pierre ULg

in International Tax and Public Finance (2015), 22

We experimentally study how receiving information about tax compliance of others affects individuals’ occupational choices and subsequent evading decisions. In one treatment individuals receive ... [more ▼]

We experimentally study how receiving information about tax compliance of others affects individuals’ occupational choices and subsequent evading decisions. In one treatment individuals receive information about the highest tax evasion rates of others in past experimental sessions with no such social information; in another treatment they receive information about the lowest tax evasion rates observed in the past sessions with no such social information. We observe an asymmetric effect of social information on tax compliance. Whereas examples of high compliance do not have any disciplining effect, we find evidence that examples of low compliance significantly increase tax evasion for certain audit probabilities. No major differences are found across countries [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSocial Security and Economic Integration
Artige, Lionel ULg; Dedry, Antoine ULg; Pestieau, Pierre ULg

in Economics Letters (2014), 123(June), 318-322

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (12 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe Macroeconomics of PAYG Pension Schemes in an Aging Society
Artige, Lionel ULg; Cavenaile, Laurent; Pestieau, Pierre ULg

E-print/Working paper (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOn the policy implications of changing longevity
Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Ponthiere, Grégory ULg

in CESifo Ecoonmic Studies (2014), 60

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLong-Term Care Insurance and Family
Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Canta, Chiara

in B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUnited but (un)equal: human capital, probability of divorce, and the marriage contract
Cremer, Helmuh; Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Roeder, Kerstin

in Journal of Population Economics (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEndogenous Altruism, Redistribution, and Long Term Care
Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Cremer, Helmuth; Gahvari, Firouz

in B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy (2014), 14(2), 499-524

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSocial Security and Family Support
Leroux, Marie Louise; Pestieau, Pierre ULg

in Canadian Journal of Economics (2014), 47(1), 115-143

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
See detailThe Shift from Defined Benefit to Defined Contribution in an Ageing Society
Artige, Lionel ULg; Cavenaile; Pestieau, Pierre ULg

Conference (2013, June 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (3 ULg)
See detailSocial Security and Economic Integration
Artige, Lionel ULg; Dedry, Antoine ULg; Pestieau, Pierre ULg

Conference (2013, June 03)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailSocial Security and Economic Integration
Artige, Lionel ULg; Dedry, Antoine ULg; Pestieau, Pierre ULg

E-print/Working paper (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeasuring poverty without the Mortality Paradox
Lefebvre, Mathieu ULg; Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Ponthiere, Grégory ULg

in Social Choice and Welfare (2013), 40(1), 285-316

Under income-differentiated mortality, poverty measures reflect not only the “true” poverty, but, also, the interferences or noise caused by the survival process at work. Such interferences lead to the ... [more ▼]

Under income-differentiated mortality, poverty measures reflect not only the “true” poverty, but, also, the interferences or noise caused by the survival process at work. Such interferences lead to the Mortality Paradox: the worse the survival conditions of the poor are, the lower the measured poverty is. We examine several solutions to avoid that paradox. We identify conditions under which the extension, by means of a fictitious income, of lifetime income profiles of the prematurely dead neutralizes the noise due to differential mortality. Then, to account not only for the “missing” poor, but, also, for the “hidden” poverty (premature death), we use, as a fictitious income, the welfare-neutral income, making indifferent between life continuation and death. The robustness of poverty measures to the extension technique is illustrated with regional Belgian data. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailSocial Security and Early Retirement in an Overlapping-Generations Growth Model
Michel, Philippe; Pestieau, Pierre ULg

in ANNALS OF ECONOMICS AND FINANCE (2013), 14

This paper explains why workers retire earlier, and earlier at the same time as society becomes more and more indebted through increasing pay-as-you- go pension liabilities. To do so, we extend the ... [more ▼]

This paper explains why workers retire earlier, and earlier at the same time as society becomes more and more indebted through increasing pay-as-you- go pension liabilities. To do so, we extend the standard two-overlapping- generations growth model to allow for endogenous labor participation in the later period of life. We show that the rate of participation declines as the size of social security system increases. We also show that mandatory early retirement many be socially desirable in case of underaccumulation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLes comportements vis-à-vis de la fraude fiscale et de la fraude sociale diffèrent-ils ? Une expérience menée en Belgique, en France et aux Pays-Bas
Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Lefebvre, Mathieu ULg; Riedl, Arno et al

in Economie et Prévision (2013), 202-203

En période de crise économique, les besoins de l’État augmentent et l’assiette fiscale se réduit. Il est alors courant de voir resurgir dans le débat public la lutte contre les diverses formes de fraude ... [more ▼]

En période de crise économique, les besoins de l’État augmentent et l’assiette fiscale se réduit. Il est alors courant de voir resurgir dans le débat public la lutte contre les diverses formes de fraude qui réduisent les recettes publiques. Dans ce contexte, on oppose régulièrement fraude fiscale à fraude sociale et la discussion porte souvent sur l’importance relative de l’une et de l’autre. On entend par fraude fiscale le détournement illégal d’un système fiscal afin de ne pas contribuer au financement des charges publiques, et par fraude sociale le fait d’échapper au versement des prélèvements sociaux ou de bénéficier indûment de prestations sociales. Les deux formes de fraude se recoupent parfois. S’il est difficile de mesurer avec précision l’une et l’autre forme de fraude, on estime généralement que la fraude fiscale représente un manque à gagner pour l’État beaucoup plus important que la fraude sociale. Cependant, ces deux types de fraude émanent probablement de populations aux caractéristiques différentes en termes d’activité et de ressources. Il est donc intéressant d’essayer d’identifier les facteurs explicatifs de ces deux types de fraude, c’est-à-dire d’étudier si ces derniers répondent à des ressorts économiques et des impératifs moraux similaires ou non. Des populations ou des groupes sont souvent stigmatisés pour pratiquer l’un ou l’autre type de fraude. Cet article se propose d’expliquer les facteurs menant à ces deux types de fraude, à partir de données obtenues d’une expérience en laboratoire. De par ses exigences de contrôle et son caractère artificiel, l’expérimentation de laboratoire peut contribuer à apporter des éléments de réponse à cette question. En effet, par le choix de valeurs de paramètres appropriées, elle permet de comparer directement les deux types de fraude du point de vue économique, de façon à isoler des dimensions non-économiques de la prise de décision. L’originalité de notre expérience est double. S’il existe maintenant un grand nombre d’expériences sur la fraude fiscale, aucune n’a été consacrée spécifiquement à la fraude sociale au sens de cumul d’un revenu de remplacement et d’un revenu dans un emploi au noir. Outre le fait de comparer la fraude fiscale et la fraude sociale dans un cadre expérimental comparable, nous avons mené cette recherche dans les deux principales régions de Belgique (Flandres et Wallonie), aux Pays-Bas et en France, afin d’élargir le champ de comparaison. Si ces pays ont des institutions différentes, la France et les Pays-Bas partagent avec l’une ou l’autre région de Belgique la même langue et, de ce fait, une culture similaire. Ceci nous permet de comparer les comportements face aux mêmes incitations économiques d’un pays à l’autre, ainsi qu’à l’intérieur de la Belgique, tout en contrôlant l’effet du contexte institutionnel. Dans l’expérience proposée, les participants doivent d’abord choisir entre un emploi offrant un revenu aléatoire mais connu de l’autorité fiscale (correspondant de fait à un emploi salarié) et un emploi offrant un revenu plus aléatoire mais non observable sans contrôle. Dans le traitement de la fraude fiscale, le second choix correspond à un travail indépendant dont le revenu n’est connu du fisc avec certitude que moyennant un contrôle. Dans le traitement de la fraude sociale, il s’agit d’une activité non déclarée que l’individu mène tout en touchant des allocations de chômage. Les valeurs des paramètres dans les deux traitements sont choisies de sorte qu’un individu rationnel et neutre au risque devrait choisir l’emploi autorisant la fraude et frauder s’il existe un très faible risque de contrôle. Les paramètres retenus sont tels que les choix devraient être identiques dans les deux traitements. Les résultats montrent que, dans le cadre du laboratoire, alors que les gains monétaires espérés de la fraude sont identiques, la fraude sociale tend à être plus probable que la fraude fiscale.On observe aussi que de nombreux individus optent pour l’emploi se prêtant à la fraude fiscale tout en ne fraudant pas, ce qui confirme l’existence d’une aversion à la tricherie chez une partie de la population. On retrouve un résultat classique dans ce type de travaux, à savoir que la fréquence des contrôles conduit à l’honnêteté fiscale. Enfin, en ce qui concerne la comparaison internationale, les différences entre les pays sont faibles. La fraude fiscale est plus fréquente chez les participants français et néerlandais que chez les participants belges toutes choses égales par ailleurs. Les participants flamands ne fraudent pas plus le fisc que les participants wallons. Il n’y a pas de différences de recours à la fraude sociale d’un pays ou d’une région à l’autre. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOptimal Fertility along the Lifecycle
Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Ponthiere, Grégory ULg

in Economic Theory (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLong-Term Care Insurance and Family Norms
Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Canta, Chiara

in The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy (2013), 14(1), 1-28

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPolicy Implications of Changing Longevity
Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Ponthière, Grégory

in CESifo Economic Studies (2013), 59(4),

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
See detailDebt, Pension and Demographics
Artige, Lionel ULg; Cavenaile, Laurent; Pestieau, Pierre ULg

Conference (2012, November 29)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (6 ULg)