References of "Perrin, F"
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See detailVoluntary brain processing in disorders of consciousness
Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Perrin, F.; Schabus, M. et al

in Neurology (2008), 71(20), 1614-1620

Background: Disentangling the vegetative state from the minimally conscious state is often difficult when relying only on behavioral observation. In this study, we explored a new active evoked related ... [more ▼]

Background: Disentangling the vegetative state from the minimally conscious state is often difficult when relying only on behavioral observation. In this study, we explored a new active evoked related potentials paradigm as an alternative method for the detection of voluntary brain activity. Methods: The participants were 22 right-handed patients (10 traumatic) diagnosed as being in a vegetative state (VS) (n 8) or in a minimally conscious state (MCS) (n 14). They were presented sequences of names containing the patient’s own name or other names, in both passive and active conditions. In the active condition, the patients were instructed to count her or his own name or to count another target name. Results: Like controls, MCS patients presented a larger P3 to the patient’s own name, in the passive and in the active conditions. Moreover, the P3 to target stimuli was higher in the active than in the passive condition, suggesting voluntary compliance to task instructions like controls. These responses were even observed in patients with low behavioral responses (e.g., visual fixationand pursuit). In contrast, no P3 differences between passive and active conditions were observed for VS patients. Conclusions: The present results suggest that active evoked-related potentials paradigms may permit detection of voluntary brain function in patients with severe brain damage who present with a disorder of consciousness, even when the patient may present with very limited to questionablyany signs of awareness. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive Event-Related Potentials in Comatose and Post-Comatose States
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg; Perrin, F.

in Neurocritical Care (2008), 8(2), 262-70

We review the interest of cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs) in comatose, vegetative, or minimally conscious patients. Auditory cognitive ERPs are useful to investigate residual cognitive functions ... [more ▼]

We review the interest of cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs) in comatose, vegetative, or minimally conscious patients. Auditory cognitive ERPs are useful to investigate residual cognitive functions, such as echoic memory (MMN), acoustical and semantic discrimination (P300), and incongruent language detection (N400). While early ERPs (such as the absence of cortical responses on somatosensory-evoked potentials) predict bad outcome, cognitive ERPs (MMN and P300) are indicative of recovery of consciousness. In coma-survivors, cognitive potentials are more frequently obtained when using stimuli that are more ecologic or have an emotional content (such as the patient's own name) than when using classical sine tones. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-consciousness in non-communicative patients
Laureys, Steven ULg; Perrin, F.; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Consciousness & Cognition (2007), 16(3), 722-741742-5

The clinical and para-clinical examination of residual self-consciousness in non-communicative severely brain damaged patients (i.e., coma, vegetative state and minimally conscious state) remains ... [more ▼]

The clinical and para-clinical examination of residual self-consciousness in non-communicative severely brain damaged patients (i.e., coma, vegetative state and minimally conscious state) remains exceptionally challenging. Passive presentation of the patient's own name and own face are known to be effective attention-grabbing stimuli when clinically assessing consciousness at the patient's bedside. Event-related potential and functional neuroimaging studies using such self-referential stimuli are currently being used to disentangle the cognitive hierarchy of self-processing. We here review neuropsychological, neuropathological, electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies using the own name and own face paradigm obtained in conscious waking, sleep, pharmacological coma, pathological coma and related disorders of consciousness. Based on these results we discuss what we currently do and do not know about the functional significance of the neural network involved in "automatic" and "conscious" self-referential processing. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain response to one's own name in vegetative state, minimally conscious state and locked-in syndrome
Perrin, F.; Schnakers, Caroline ULg; Schabus, M. et al

in Archives of Neurology (2006), 63

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See detailResidual cognitive function in comatose, vegetative and minimally conscious states
Laureys, Steven ULg; Perrin, F.; Schnakers, Caroline ULg et al

in Current Opinion In Neurology (2005), 18(6), 726-733

Purpose of review The clinical evaluation of cognition in non-communicative severely brain-damaged patients is inherently difficult. In addition to novel behavioural 'consciousness-scales', the role of ... [more ▼]

Purpose of review The clinical evaluation of cognition in non-communicative severely brain-damaged patients is inherently difficult. In addition to novel behavioural 'consciousness-scales', the role of para-clinical markers of consciousness, such as event related potentials and functional neuroimaging is reviewed. Recent findings New behavioural scales for vegetative and minimally conscious patients have been shown to reduce diagnostic error but regrettably remain underused in clinical routine. Electrophysiological studies have confirmed their role in estimating outcome and possibly cognition. Several recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown residual cortical function in undeniably vegetative patients. This cortical activation, however, seems limited to primary 'low-level' areas and does not imply 'higher-order' integration, considered necessary for conscious perception. Minimally conscious patients show large-scale high-order cerebral activation, apparently dependent upon the emotional relevance of the stimulation. Summary Careful clinical assessment of putative 'conscious behaviour' in vegetative and minimally conscious patients is the first requirement for their proper diagnosis and management. Complementary functional neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies will have a major impact on future clinical decision making and may guide selective therapeutic options. At present, more experimental evidence and the elucidation of methodological and ethical controversies are awaited prior to their routine clinical use. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman cognition during REM sleep and the activity profile within frontal and parietal cortices: a reappraisal of functional neuroimaging data
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Ruby, P.; Maudoux, Audrey ULg et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2005), 150(Boundaries of Consciousness: Neurobiology and Neuropathology), 219-227

In this chapter, we aimed at further characterizing the functional neuroanatomy of the human rapid eye movement (REM) sleep at the population level. We carried out a meta-analysis of a large dataset of ... [more ▼]

In this chapter, we aimed at further characterizing the functional neuroanatomy of the human rapid eye movement (REM) sleep at the population level. We carried out a meta-analysis of a large dataset of positron emission tomography (PET) scans acquired during wakefulness, slow wave sleep and REM sleep, and focused especially on the brain areas in which the activity diminishes during REM sleep. Results show that quiescent regions are confined to the inferior and middle frontal cortex and to the inferior parietal lobule. Providing a plausible explanation for some of the features of dream reports, these findings may help in refining the concepts, which try to account for human cognition during REM sleep. In particular, we discuss the significance of these results to explain the alteration in executive processes, episodic memory retrieval and self representation during REM sleep dreaming as well as the incorporation of external stimuli into the dream narrative. [less ▲]

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