References of "Peigneux, Philippe"
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See detailSleep and Movement Disorders: Neuroimaging Aspects
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Ratti, Pietro-Luca et al

in Chokroverty, Sudhansu; Montagna, Pasquale; Allen, Richard (Eds.) et al Sleep and Movement Disorders (in press)

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See detailInter-individual differences in sleep-wake regulation: impact on attention-related cerebral correlates
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Maire, Micheline; Reichert, Carolin et al

Conference (2015)

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See detailPushing the Limits: Chronotype and Time of Day Modulate Working Memory-Dependent Cerebral Activity.
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Reichert, Carolin F. et al

in Frontiers in neurology (2015), 6

Morning-type individuals experience more difficulties to maintain optimal attentional performance throughout a normal waking day than evening types. However, time-of-day modulations may differ across ... [more ▼]

Morning-type individuals experience more difficulties to maintain optimal attentional performance throughout a normal waking day than evening types. However, time-of-day modulations may differ across cognitive domains. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated how chronotype and time of day interact with working memory at different levels of cognitive load/complexity in a N-back paradigm (N0-, N2-, and N3-back levels). Extreme morning- and evening-type individuals underwent two fMRI sessions during N-back performance, one 1.5 h (morning) and one 10.5 h (evening) after wake-up time scheduled according to their habitual sleep-wake preference. At the behavioral level, increasing working memory load resulted in lower accuracy while chronotype and time of day only exerted a marginal impact on performance. Analyses of neuroimaging data disclosed an interaction between chronotype, time of day, and the modulation of cerebral activity by working memory load in the thalamus and in the middle frontal cortex. In the subjective evening hours, evening types exhibited higher thalamic activity than morning types at the highest working memory load condition only (N3-back). Conversely, morning-type individuals exhibited higher activity than evening-type participants in the middle frontal gyrus during the morning session in the N3-back condition. Our data emphasize interindividual differences in time-of-day preferences and underlying cerebral activity, which should be taken into account when investigating vigilance state effects in task-related brain activity. These results support the hypothesis that higher task complexity leads to a chronotype-dependent increase in thalamic and frontal brain activity, permitting stabilization of working memory performance across the day. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep-dependent neurophysiological processes in implicit sequence learning.
Urbain, Charline; Schmitz, Remy; Schmidt, Christina ULg et al

in Journal of cognitive neuroscience (2013), 25(11), 2003-14

Behavioral studies have cast doubts about the role that posttraining sleep may play in the consolidation of implicit sequence learning. Here, we used event-related fMRI to test the hypothesis that sleep ... [more ▼]

Behavioral studies have cast doubts about the role that posttraining sleep may play in the consolidation of implicit sequence learning. Here, we used event-related fMRI to test the hypothesis that sleep-dependent functional reorganization would take place in the underlying neural circuits even in the possible absence of obvious behavioral changes. Twenty-four healthy human adults were scanned at Day 1 and then at Day 4 during an implicit probabilistic serial RT task. They either slept normally (RS) or were sleep-deprived (SD) on the first posttraining night. Unknown to them, the sequential structure of the material was based on a probabilistic finite-state grammar, with 15% chance on each trial of replacing the rules-based grammatical (G) stimulus with a nongrammatical (NG) one. Results indicated a gradual differentiation across sessions between RTs (faster RTs for G than NG), together with NG-related BOLD responses reflecting sequence learning. Similar behavioral patterns were observed in RS and SD participants at Day 4, indicating time- but not sleep-dependent consolidation of performance. Notwithstanding, we observed at Day 4 in the RS group a diminished differentiation between G- and NG-related neurophysiological responses in a set of cortical and subcortical areas previously identified as being part of the network involved in implicit sequence learning and its offline processing during sleep, indicating a sleep-dependent processing of both regular and deviant stimuli. Our results suggest the sleep-dependent development of distinct neurophysiological processes subtending consolidation of implicit motor sequence learning, even in the absence of overt behavioral differences. [less ▲]

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See detailAdaptating test timing to the sleep-wake schedule: effects on diurnal neurobehavioral performance changes in young evening and older morning chronotypes
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Cajochen, Christian et al

in Chronobiology International (2012), 29(4), 482-490

The synchrony effect refers to the beneficial impact of temporal matching between the timing of cognitive task administration and preferred time of day for diurnal activity. Aging is often associated with ... [more ▼]

The synchrony effect refers to the beneficial impact of temporal matching between the timing of cognitive task administration and preferred time of day for diurnal activity. Aging is often associated with an advance in sleep-wake timing and concomitant optimal performance levels in the morning. In contrast, young adults often perform better in the evening hours. So far, the synchrony effect has been tested at fixed clock times, neglecting the individual’s sleep-wake schedule and thus introducing confounds such as differences in accumulated sleep pressure or circadian phase that may exacerbate synchrony effects. To probe this hypothesis, we tested older morning and young evening chronotypes with a psychomotor vigilance and a Stroop paradigm once at fixed morning and evening hours and once adapting testing time to their preferred sleep-wake schedule in a within-subject design. We observe a persistence of synchrony effects for overall median reaction times during a psychomotor vigilance task even when testing time is adapted to the specific individual’s sleep-wake schedule. However, data analysis also indicates that time-of-day modulations are weakened under those conditions for incongruent trials on Stroop performance and the slowest reaction times on the psychomotor vigilance task. The latter result suggests that the classically observed synchrony effect may be partially mediated by a series of parameters, such as differences in socio-professional timing constraints, the amount of accumulated sleep need or circadian phase, all leading to differential arousal levels at testing. [less ▲]

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See detailAge-related changes in sleep and circadian rhythms: impact on cognitive performance and underlying neuroanatomical networks.
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Cajochen, Christian

in Frontiers in neurology (2012), 3

Circadian and homeostatic sleep-wake regulatory processes interact in a fine tuned manner to modulate human cognitive performance. Dampening of the circadian alertness signal and attenuated deterioration ... [more ▼]

Circadian and homeostatic sleep-wake regulatory processes interact in a fine tuned manner to modulate human cognitive performance. Dampening of the circadian alertness signal and attenuated deterioration of psychomotor vigilance in response to elevated sleep pressure with aging change this interaction pattern. As evidenced by neuroimaging studies, both homeostatic sleep pressure and circadian sleep-wake promotion impact on cognition-related cortical and arousal-promoting subcortical brain regions including the thalamus, the anterior hypothalamus, and the brainstem locus coeruleus (LC). However, how age-related changes in circadian and homeostatic processes impact on the cerebral activity subtending waking performance remains largely unexplored. Post-mortem studies point to neuronal degeneration in the SCN and age-related modifications in the arousal-promoting LC. Alongside, cortical frontal brain areas are particularly susceptible both to aging and misalignment between circadian and homeostatic processes. In this perspective, we summarize and discuss here the potential neuroanatomical networks underlying age-related changes in circadian and homeostatic modulation of waking performance, ranging from basic arousal to higher order cognitive behaviors. [less ▲]

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See detailCircadian preference modulates the neural substrate of conflict processing across the day
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(1), 29658

Human morning and evening chronotypes differ in their preferred timing for sleep and wakefulness, as well as in optimal daytime periods to cope with cognitive challenges. Recent evidence suggests that ... [more ▼]

Human morning and evening chronotypes differ in their preferred timing for sleep and wakefulness, as well as in optimal daytime periods to cope with cognitive challenges. Recent evidence suggests that these preferences are not a simple by-product of socio-professional timing constraints, but can be driven by inter-individual differences in the expression of circadian and homeostatic sleep-wake promoting signals. Chronotypes thus constitute a unique tool to access the interplay between those processes under normally entrained day-night conditions, and to investigate how they impinge onto higher cognitive control processes. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we assessed the influence of chronotype and time-of-day on conflict processing-related cerebral activity throughout a normal waking day. Sixteen morning and 15 evening types were recorded at two individually adapted time points (1.5 versus 10.5 hours spent awake) while performing the Stroop paradigm. Results show that interference-related hemodynamic responses are maintained or even increased in evening types from the subjective morning to the subjective evening in a set of brain areas playing a pivotal role in successful inhibitory functioning, whereas they decreased in morning types under the same conditions. Furthermore, during the evening hours, activity in a posterior hypothalamic region putatively involved in sleep-wake regulation correlated in a chronotype-specific manner with slow wave activity at the beginning of the night, an index of accumulated homeostatic sleep pressure. These results shed light into the cerebral mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences of higher-order cognitive state maintenance under normally entrained day-night conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailLateralized processing of false memories and pseudoneglect in aging.
Schmitz, Rémy; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2012)

Aging is associated with higher propensity to false memories and decreased retrieval of previously studied items. When young adults perform on a lateralized version of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM ... [more ▼]

Aging is associated with higher propensity to false memories and decreased retrieval of previously studied items. When young adults perform on a lateralized version of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, the right cerebral hemisphere (RH) is more sensitive than the left (LH) to false memories, suggesting hemispheric imbalance in the cerebral mechanisms supporting semantic and episodic memory processes. Since cerebral asymmetries tend to be reduced with age, we surmised that behavioral asymmetries in the generation of false memories would be diminished with aging. To probe this hypothesis, a lateralized version of the DRM paradigm was administered to old (OA) and young (YA) healthy adults. During the encoding phase, lists of semantically associated words were memorized. During the retrieval session, targets (previously seen words), lures (never seen strongly semantically related words) and distracters (never seen, unrelated words) were briefly displayed either in the left or right visual fields, thus primarily stimulating the RH or LH, respectively. Participants had to decide whether the word was previously studied (Old/New), but also whether they had a strong episodic recollection (Remember) or a mere feeling of familiarity (Know) about Old words. In line with our predictions, false memories were globally higher in OA than YA, and vivid false recollections (i.e. Remember responses) were higher when lures were presented in the RH in YA, but not in OA. Additionally, we found significant correlations between YA participants’ familiarity scores and leftward attentional bias as previously evidenced using a visuospatial landmark task [Schmitz, R., and Peigneux, P. (2011). Age-related changes in visual pseudoneglect. Brain and Cognition, 76(3), 382-389], an effect not present in OA. This result is in line with the hypothesis of an interplay between attentional resources allocated to visuospatial and memory processes, suggesting a memory pseudoneglect phenomenon that would be altered with aging. [less ▲]

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See detailExploration neurodéveloppementale de la mémoire de travail par neuroimagerie fonctionnelle
Noro, Magali; Linotte, Sylvie; Ansseau, Marc ULg et al

in Encéphale (L') (2011), 37

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See detailFaux souvenirs et traitement hémisphérique dans le vieillissement.
Gajewski, Celine; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

Poster (2010, September)

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See detailFalse memories and hemispheric processing in aging
Gajewski, Celine; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

Poster (2010, May)

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See detailResponse to Comment on “Homeostatic Sleep Pressure and Responses to Sustained Attention in the Suprachiasmatic Area”
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in Science (2010)

Astafiev et al. question whether the blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) response that we reported in the brainstem was located in the locus coeruleus (LC). Using high-resolution T1-turbo spin echo images ... [more ▼]

Astafiev et al. question whether the blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) response that we reported in the brainstem was located in the locus coeruleus (LC). Using high-resolution T1-turbo spin echo images (T1-TSE) acquired in an independent group of subjects, we show that the reported task-related BOLD response in the brainstem is actually compatible with the anatomical location of the LC. [less ▲]

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See detailWorking memory load affects chronotype- and time-of-day dependent cerebral activity modulations
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2010), 19(Suppl. 2),

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See detailSleep and Sleep States: PET activation patterns
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Squire, Larry (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Neuroscience (2009)

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See detailNeuroimaging in Sleep and Sleep Disorders
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Schwartz, Sophie et al

in Chokroverty, Sudhansu (Ed.) Sleep Disorders Medicine (2009)

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See detailPET activation patterns
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Stickgold, Robert; Walker, Matthew (Eds.) The Neuroscience of Sleep (2009)

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See detailHomeostatic sleep pressure and responses to sustained attention in the suprachiasmatic area.
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Leclercq, Yves ULg et al

in Science (2009), 324(5926), 516-9

Throughout the day, cognitive performance is under the combined influence of circadian processes and homeostatic sleep pressure. Some people perform best in the morning, whereas others are more alert in ... [more ▼]

Throughout the day, cognitive performance is under the combined influence of circadian processes and homeostatic sleep pressure. Some people perform best in the morning, whereas others are more alert in the evening. These chronotypes provide a unique way to study the effects of sleep-wake regulation on the cerebral mechanisms supporting cognition. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in extreme chronotypes, we found that maintaining attention in the evening was associated with higher activity in evening than morning chronotypes in a region of the locus coeruleus and in a suprachiasmatic area (SCA) including the circadian master clock. Activity in the SCA decreased with increasing homeostatic sleep pressure. This result shows the direct influence of the homeostatic and circadian interaction on the neural activity underpinning human behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailBispectral index correlates with regional cerebral blood flow during sleep in distinct cortical and subcortical structures in humans.
Noirhomme, Quentin ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg; Bonhomme, Vincent ULg et al

in Archives Italiennes de Biologie (2009), 147(1-2), 51-7

The relationship between the Bispectral Index (BIS), an EEG-based monitor of anesthesia, and brain activity is still unclear. This study aimed at investigating the relationship between changes in BIS ... [more ▼]

The relationship between the Bispectral Index (BIS), an EEG-based monitor of anesthesia, and brain activity is still unclear. This study aimed at investigating the relationship between changes in BIS values during natural sleep and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) variations, as measured by Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Data were obtained from six young, healthy, right-handed, male volunteers (20-30 years old) using the H2(15)O infusion method. PET scans were performed both during waking and various stages of sleep. BIS values were monitored continuously and recorded during each PET scan. Positive correlations were detected between BIS and rCBF values in dorsolateral prefontal, parietal, anterior and posterior cingulate, precuneal, mesiofrontal, mesiotemporal and insular cortices. These areas belong to a frontoparietal network known to be related to awareness of self conscious sensory perception, attention and memory. BIS values also positively correlated with activity in brainstem and thalami, both structures known to be involved in arousal and wakefulness. These results show that BIS changes associated with physiological sleep depth co-vary with the activity of specific cortical and subcortical areas. The latter are known to modulate arousal, which in turn allows sustained thalamo-cortical enhancement of activity in a specific frontoparietal network known to be related to the content of consciousness. Thus, although mainly derived from frontal EEG, BIS could represent a wider index of cerebral activity. [less ▲]

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