References of "Peeters, Marie"
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See detailRider and horse salivary cortisol levels during competition and impact on performance.
Peeters, Marie ULg; Closson, Coline; Beckers, Jean-François ULg et al

in Journal of Equine Veterinary Science (2013), 33(3), 155-160

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See detailRelationships between young stallions's temperament and their behavioral reactions during standardized veterinary examinations.
Peeters, Marie ULg; Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Serteyn, Didier ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research (2012), 7(5), 311-321

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See detailÉvaluation du niveau de stress du cheval en compétition et en milieu hospitalier : Mesures comportementales, physiologiques et appréciation du tempérament
Peeters, Marie ULg

Doctoral thesis (2011)

Both in humans and in animals, stress is sometimes considered as useful for the accomplishment of certain tasks. But it might also have a negative influence on health, welfare or safety. We often impose ... [more ▼]

Both in humans and in animals, stress is sometimes considered as useful for the accomplishment of certain tasks. But it might also have a negative influence on health, welfare or safety. We often impose on our domestic horses a lifestyle very different from their natural one. As soon as we interact with this animal, either during manipulations or in competition, we face him to various stressors. This stress can affect their health, their well-being as well as their sportive performances. Horses’ stress might also lead to a lack of safety for people handling them (horsemen, riders, breeders, veterinarian,...). Stress can be assessed by various indirect ways. Among all responses possibly shown by horses submitted to a stressor, we mainly focused on behavioural responses and on a physiological response: changes in cortisol secretion. Our first goal was to validate the use of saliva for free cortisol level determination. Secondly, we used this technique to assess stress level of both horses and riders during equestrian competitions. We compared riders’ and horses’ stress levels and we examined the potential relationship between the stress levels and the competition performances. The results showed that cortisol levels significantly increased during competition, both in horses and riders. The best performances were achieved by riders with the smallest increase in cortisol during competition. And, more surprisingly, the best performances were achieved by horses with highest cortisol increase. In this study, stress of both partners seems to have an opposite influence on their performances during competition: positive effects for horses (‘eustress’) but negative effects for riders (‘distress’). It would be interesting to test these measurements under other competition conditions. We also have tested the relationship between the horse’s temperament (scored by the owner), the stress levels in competition and the obtained performances. It came out that a higher increase in cortisol is more related to some ‘excitement’ rather than anxiety, and was mainly found in curious, motivated and active horses. This stress follow-up in competition should improve the welfare of the horse and his rider, and should probably also enhance performances achieved by the pair. In clinical settings, we identified the stress-related behaviours, that use to lead to a low ‘easiness of manipulation’. We also tested the relationship between temperament assessed by the owners, by the clinic staff and the stress-related behaviours. More particularly, we observed a predictive effect of a simple test (weigh scale test) on the appearance of these stress-related behaviours. This test would allow clinicians to anticipate potential difficulties during examinations and to prevent deriving injuries. Improving the stress measurement techniques and horses’ temperament assessment is essential for domestic horse welfare studies, as they occur in hospital, during competition, or in other stressful situations. Using physiological stress measurements, as salivary cortisol, is very useful and more reliable if they are used in conjunction with ethological methods.  [less ▲]

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See detailIMPACT OF THE TEMPERAMENT OF YOUNG STALLIONS ON THEIR STRESS REACTIONS WHEN SUBJECTED TO A STANDARDISED VETERINARY EXAMINATION
Peeters, Marie ULg; Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Serteyn, Didier ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research (2011, September), 6

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See detailEvaluation du stress chez le cheval
Peeters, Marie ULg

Scientific conference (2011, March 04)

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See detailLe stress du cavalier et du cheval en compétition
Peeters, Marie ULg; Closson, Coline ULg; Beckers, Jean-François ULg et al

Poster (2011, February 24)

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See detailComparison between blood serum and salivary cortisol concentrations in horses using an adrenocorticotropic hormone challenge
Peeters, Marie ULg; Sulon, Joseph; Beckers, Jean-François ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2011), 43(4), 487-493

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See detailCan we predict troubles during horse clinical examination by a simple test?
Peeters, Marie ULg; Godfroid, Sandra; Sulon, Joseph et al

Poster (2010, August 03)

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See detailAssessment of stress level in horses during competition using salivary cortisol: preliminary studies
Peeters, Marie ULg; Sulon, Joseph; Serteyn, Didier ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Behavior : Clinical Applications and Research (2010, July), 5(4), 216

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See detailAssessment of stress level in horses (Equus caballus): behavioural and physiological measurements in hospital.
Peeters, Marie ULg; Péters, F.; Sulon, J. et al

Conference (2008)

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