References of "Paternostre, Julien"
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See detailSinuso-nasal adenocarcinoma in a roe deer (Capreolus capreolus)
Volpe, Rosario ULg; Cassart, Dominique ULg; Neukermans, Axel et al

Poster (2014, October)

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See detailMolecular evidence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in wild boar (Sus scrofa) in Belgium
Nahayo, Adrien; Bardiau, Marjorie ULg; Volpe, Rosario ULg et al

in BMC Veterinary Research (2014), 10(80),

Anaplasma phagocytophilum is a tick-borne pathogen of veterinary and human importance. Both ticks as vectors and vertebrates as reservoir hosts are essential for the cycle maintenance of this bacterium ... [more ▼]

Anaplasma phagocytophilum is a tick-borne pathogen of veterinary and human importance. Both ticks as vectors and vertebrates as reservoir hosts are essential for the cycle maintenance of this bacterium. Currently, the whole range of animal species reservoirs for A. phagocytophilum in natural environment is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of infection with A. phagocytophilum in the wild boar population in southern Belgium. [less ▲]

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See detailSchmallenberg virus circulation among red and roe deer populations in Belgium
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Volpe, Rosario ULg; Paternostre, Julien ULg et al

in 31th Congress of the International Union of Game Biologists, Abstract Book (2013, August 27)

Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is a recently discovered vector-borne Orthobunyavirus targeting ruminants. It is transmitted by Culicoides biting midges and caused a large outbreak in European sheep and cattle ... [more ▼]

Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is a recently discovered vector-borne Orthobunyavirus targeting ruminants. It is transmitted by Culicoides biting midges and caused a large outbreak in European sheep and cattle populations in 2011 and 2012. The infection of adults was associated with a drop in milk production, fever and diarrhea. But the virus was further shown to cross the placental barrier and to be responsible for a hydrocephaly/arthrogryposis syndrome in calves and lambs. After its occurrence in 2011 in Germany, SBV quickly spread across Europe and in spring 2012 more than 90% of Belgian domestic cattle had seroconverted. To assess the susceptibility of wild ruminants to the infection, a total number of 547 and 494 sera, from red (Cervus elaphus) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), respectively, were collected during the hunting seasons 2010 to 2012 and tested for the presence of anti-SBV antibodies. While no samples from 2010 revealed to be positive, about two-thirds of red deer and half of roe deer sampled in 2011 were seropositive. In 2012, the seroprevalence dropped to 33% in red deer and remained stable in roe deer. The high seroprevalence rates found in both species in Belgium shows that wild ruminants are susceptible to the infection by SBV. If the infection of deer was associated to a hydrocephaly/arthrogryposis syndrome similar to that observed in domestic ruminants is still unknown. There is currently no evidence of such a transplacental passage in red or roe deer. The decrease in the seroprevalence observed in red deer in 2012 might be the result of the turn-over in the red deer population and reflect an absence of virus circulation in 2012. Further investigations in the upcoming years will help to enlighten this point. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of antibodies against Schmallenberg virus in wild boars, Belgium, 2010-2012
Desmecht, Daniel ULg; Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Beer, Martin et al

in Lecoq, Yves (Ed.) 31th Congress of the International Union of Game Biologists (2013, August 27)

In the summer/fall of 2011, a nonspecific febrile syndrome characterized by hyperthermia and drop in milk production with occasional reports of watery diarrhea and abortion was reported among dairy cows ... [more ▼]

In the summer/fall of 2011, a nonspecific febrile syndrome characterized by hyperthermia and drop in milk production with occasional reports of watery diarrhea and abortion was reported among dairy cows on farms in northwestern Europe. Further, in November 2011, an enzootic outbreak of malformed neonates emerged in several European countries, with stillbirth and birth at term of lambs, kids and calves with neurological signs or malformations of the head, spine, or limbs. Both syndromes were associated with the presence in the blood (adults) or in the central nervous system (newborns) of a new Shamonda/Sathuperi-like orthobunyavirus, provisionally named Schmallenberg virus (SBV) after the town in Germany where the first positive clinical samples were identified. Defining as precisely as possible the host range of the newcomer is a key point to predict the outcome of the emergence of SBV disease in Europe. In this respect, it must be pointed out that orthobunyaviruses infect more animal species than those in which the foetus is damaged. Recently, serological evidence for SBV infection in wild ruminant species (Cervus elaphus and Capreolus capreolus) was reported (Linden et al., 2012). In the present study, the objective was to seek after serological evidence of SBV infection among wild boars living in a geographical area where exposure to infected insect vectors was high in 2011, as judged from the very high seroprevalence reported among cattle in that region. About 700 animals were sampled during the 2010-2012 hunting seasons. All serum samples collected during the fall of 2010 were seronegative. On the contrary, apparent seroprevalence among wild boars in 2011 was ~27% and started to decline in 2012 (~11%). Acquired immunity against the new virus was thus already very high in the wild boar populations sampled in the fall 2011, suggesting that the new virus had quickly spread throughout the region since its emergence about 250 km northeast in the late summer 2011. The drop in seroprevalence recorded in 2012 suggests that the virus was no more circulating in the region. [less ▲]

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See detailEpizootic spread of emerging Schmallenberg virus in wild cervids, Belgium, fall 2011
Linden, Annick ULg; Desmecht, Daniel ULg; Volpe, Rosario ULg et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2012), 18(12), 2006-2008

The Schmallenberg virus emerged in summer-fall 2011 in North-West Europe. During the fall of 2011, the virus widely spread in red and roe deer populations living about 250 km from the emergence location.

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See detailCulicoides (Diptera : Ceratopogonidae) : important vectors of cattle diseases. Control assays in Belgium
Smeets, François ULg; Robert, Nancy; Simonon, Grégory et al

Poster (2012, October 19)

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See detailLes Culicoides, importants vecteurs de maladies du bétail
Smeets, François ULg; Robert, Nancy; Simonon, Grégory et al

Diverse speeche and writing (2012)

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See detailSurveillance of wildlife diseases in Belgium
Linden, Annick ULg; Wirtgen, Marc ULg; Volpe, Rosario ULg et al

in Epidémiologie et Santé Animale (2011), 59-60

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See detailBiting midges (Ceratopogonidae: Culicoïdes) in Belgium: a comparison between indoor and outdoor trapping in cattle and sheep farms.
Losson, Bertrand ULg; Robert, Nancy ULg; Paternostre, Julien ULg et al

Conference (2009, August)

Bluetongue, a vector born disease of ruminants, was identified for the first time in Northern Europe in 2006. The vectors are insects of the family Ceratopogonidae, genus Culicoides. In Belgium, no recent ... [more ▼]

Bluetongue, a vector born disease of ruminants, was identified for the first time in Northern Europe in 2006. The vectors are insects of the family Ceratopogonidae, genus Culicoides. In Belgium, no recent data were available about the biology of these insects including their feeding habits and behaviour. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the indoor and outdoor activity of these Diptera in 5 different cattle or sheep farms in 2008. Two sheep and 3 cattle farms were selected in the Province of Luxembourg, Belgium. In each farm 2 Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (OVI) traps were installed respectively inside and outside the animal accommodation. Trapping was carried out twice a week from 17:00 until 24:00.The collecting vials were replaced every hour. A portable suction trap (BackTrap® U.S.A) was used twice on each visit to collect midges on the animals. In each farm the study was carried out for 6 successive weeks, 2 farms being monitored together. The study began on July 28th and ended on November 30th 2008. A total of 2591 culicoides were trapped. A majority of those (88.76%) were trapped indoors whereas 10.03% were trapped outdoors and 1.21% directly on the animals. The ambient temperature had a marked effect very few culicoides being trapped below 13°C. Three main species or species complex were identified both indoors and outdoors: C. obsoletus/scoticus, C. dewulfi, C. chiopterus. They represented 98.93% and 85.03% indoors and outdoors respectively. On the animals only C. obsoletus/scoticus and C. dewulfi were found. [less ▲]

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See detailDistribution of potential bluetongue vectors on Belgium farms
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2008), 162(21), 700

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See detailBreeding sites of bluetongue vectors in northern Europe
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2008), 162(4), 131

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See detailBiting Midges Overwintering In Belgium
Losson, Bertrand ULg; Mignon, Bernard ULg; Paternostre, Julien ULg et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2007), 160(13), 451-452

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