References of "Parmentier, Eric"
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See detailDetection of anthropogenic particles in fish stomachs: an isolation method adapted to identification by Raman spectroscopy
Collard, France ULg; Gilbert, Bernard ULg; Eppe, Gauthier ULg et al

in Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology (in press)

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See detailIsolation and identification of anthropogenic particles in fish stomachs by Raman spectroscopy: a new method
Collard, France ULg; Gilbert, Bernard ULg; Eppe, Gauthier ULg et al

in Organohalogen Compounds (2015, August)

Microplastic particles (MP) contaminate oceans and affect marine organisms in several ways. Ingestion combined with food intake is generally reported. However, data interpretation is often circumvented by ... [more ▼]

Microplastic particles (MP) contaminate oceans and affect marine organisms in several ways. Ingestion combined with food intake is generally reported. However, data interpretation is often circumvented by the difficulty to separate MP from bulk samples. Visual examination is often used as one or the only step to sort these particles. However, color, size and shape are insufficient and often unreliable criteria. Here we present an isolation method of MP specially adapted to a subsequent analysis by Raman spectroscopy. This method avoids fluorescence problems allowing the identification anthropogenic particles (AP) from stomach contents of fish by Raman spectroscopy. It was validated with commercial samples of microplastics and cotton along with stomach contents from three different Clupeiformes fishes: Clupea harengus, Sardina pilchardus and Engraulis encrasicolus. The optimized digestion and isolation protocol showed no visible impact on microplastics and cotton particles while the spectroscopic analysis allowed precise identification of microplastics and textile fibers. This approach allowed us to isolate 35 particles. These were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy: eleven were microplastics and thirteen were made of cellulose or lignin, or both (mostly fibers). Some particles were not identified but contained artificial colorants. This isolation protocol will help to assess the presence, quantity and composition of AP in planktivorous fish stomachs. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom the ocean to a reef habitat : how do the larvae of coral reef fishes find their wa y home? A state of art on the lat est advances
Barth, P; Berenshtein, I; Besson, M et al

in Vie et Milieu (2015), 65(2), 91-100

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See detailEffects of Holothuroid Ichtyotoxic Saponins on the Gills of Free-Living Fishes and Symbiotic Pearlfishes
Eeckhaut, Igor; Caulier, Guillaume; Brasseur, Lola et al

in The Biological Bulletin (2015), 228(3), 253-265

Several carapid fishes, known as pearlfishes, are endosymbiotic in holothuroids and asteroids. These echinoderms contain a strong concentration of saponins that are efficient membranolytic repellents to ... [more ▼]

Several carapid fishes, known as pearlfishes, are endosymbiotic in holothuroids and asteroids. These echinoderms contain a strong concentration of saponins that are efficient membranolytic repellents to predators. We compared the effects of exposure to saponins from the sea cucumber body wall and from the Cuvierian tubules on the behavior and gill ultrastructure of pearlfishes and free-living fishes. Saponins were extracted from the body wall of two holothuroids, the Mediterranean Holothuria forskali and the tropical Bohadschia atra, and from the water surrounding the Cuvierian tubules of B. atra. Five species of carapids that live in symbiosis with holothuroids and seven species of free-living fishes were exposed to these extracts. The free-living fishes exhibited a stress response and died about 45 times faster than pearlfishes when exposed to the same quantity of saponins. Cuvierian tubules and saponins extracted from the body wall were lethal to the free-living fishes, whereas the carapids were much less sensitive. The carapids did not exhibit a stress response. The high toxicity shown by Cuvierian tubules was not explained by the nature of the saponins that were identified by mass spectrometry, but it is likely due to the higher concentration of saponins in the tubules. Histology and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the gills of the free-living fishes and pearlfishes showed that saponins act at the level of the secondary lamellae where they induce the detachment of the epithelia, create edema at the level of the epithelia, and induce pores in the epithelial cells that lead to their destruction and the invasion of inner cells (pillar cells and red blood cells). This sequence of events happens 5 min after saponin exposure in free-living fishes and after 1 h in carapids. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental constraints drive the partitioning of the soundscape in fishes
Ruppé, Laetitia; Clément, Gaël; Herrel, Anthony et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2015)

The underwater environment is more and more being depicted as particularly noisy, and the inventory of calling fishes is continuously increasing. However, it currently remains unknown how species share ... [more ▼]

The underwater environment is more and more being depicted as particularly noisy, and the inventory of calling fishes is continuously increasing. However, it currently remains unknown how species share the soundscape and are able to communicate without misinterpreting the messages. Different mechanisms of interference avoidance have been documented in birds, mammals, and frogs, but little is known about interference avoidance in fishes. How fish thus partition the soundscape underwater remains unknown, as acoustic communication and its organization have never been studied at the level of fish communities. In this study, passive acoustic recordings were used to inventory sounds produced in a fish community (120 m depth) in an attempt to understand how different species partition the acoustic environment. We uncovered an important diversity of fish sounds, and 16 of the 37 different sounds recorded were sufficiently abundant to use in a quantitative analysis. We show that sonic activity allows a clear distinction between a diurnal and a nocturnal group of fishes. Moreover, frequencies of signals made during the day overlap, whereas there is a clear distinction between the different representatives of the nocturnal callers because of a lack of overlap in sound frequency. This first demonstration, to our knowledge, of interference avoidance in a fish community can be understood by the way sounds are used. In diurnal species, sounds are mostly used to support visual display, whereas nocturnal species are generally deprived of visual cues, resulting in acoustic constraints being more important. [less ▲]

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See detailAgonistic sounds and swim bladder morphology in a malapterurid electric catfish
Boyle, Kelly; Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg

in Journal of Zoology (2015)

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See detailEffects of seawater temperature on sound characteristics in Ophidion rochei (Ophidiidae)
Kever, Loïc ULg; Boyle, Kelly S.; Parmentier, Eric ULg

in Journal of Fish Biology (2015)

Although the sound production mechanisms of male and female Ophidion rochei (Ophidiidae) differ significantly, temperature affects them in the same manner. In both sexes, temperature correlated negatively ... [more ▼]

Although the sound production mechanisms of male and female Ophidion rochei (Ophidiidae) differ significantly, temperature affects them in the same manner. In both sexes, temperature correlated negatively with pulse period and positively with sound frequencies but had no, or weak effects on other sound characteristics [less ▲]

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See detailChapter 3- Mechanisms of Fish Sound Production
Fine, Michael; Parmentier, Eric ULg

in Ladich, Friedrich (Ed.) Sound Communication in Fishes (2015)

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See detailThe influence of various reef sounds on coral-fish larvae behaviour
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Berten, Laetitia; Rigo, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Fish Biology (2015)

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See detailSound production in Onuxodon fowleri (Carapidae) and its amplification by the host shell
Kever, Loïc ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Lugli, Marco et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2014), 217

Onuxodon species are well known for living inside pearl oysters. As in other carapids, their anatomy highlights their ability to make sounds but sound production has never been documented in Onuxodon ... [more ▼]

Onuxodon species are well known for living inside pearl oysters. As in other carapids, their anatomy highlights their ability to make sounds but sound production has never been documented in Onuxodon. This paper describes sound production in Onuxodon fowleri as well as the anatomy of the sound production apparatus. Single-pulsed sounds and multiple-pulsed sounds that sometimes last more than 3 s were recorded in the field and in captivity (Makemo Island, French Polynesia). These pulses are characterized by a broadband frequency spectrum from 100 to 1000 Hz. Onuxodon fowleri is mainly characterized by its ability to modulate the pulse period, meaning that this species can produce pulsed sounds and tonal-like sounds using the same mechanism. In addition, the sound can be remarkably amplified by the shell cavity (peak gain can exceed 10 dB for some frequencies). The sonic apparatus of O. fowleri is characterized by a rocker bone in front of the swimbladder, modified vertebrae and epineurals, and two pairs of sonic muscles, one of which (primary sonic muscle) inserts on the rocker bone. The latter structure, which is absent in other carapid genera, appears to be sexually dimorphic suggesting differences in sound production in males and females. Sound production in O. fowleri could be an example of adaptation where an animal exploits features of its environment to enhance communication. [less ▲]

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See detailSound production in piranhas and relatives: preliminary results
Melotte, Geoffrey ULg; Michel, Christian ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg

Poster (2014, December 12)

Acoustic communication plays an important role in the life of many teleost species where it is mainly involved in agonistic and/or courtship behaviour(s). Despite the large number of species in the family ... [more ▼]

Acoustic communication plays an important role in the life of many teleost species where it is mainly involved in agonistic and/or courtship behaviour(s). Despite the large number of species in the family Serrasalmidae (92 species), sound production has been described only in some of them, particularly in the genera Serrasalmus and Pygocentrus. The aim of this study is to investigate the sound producing abilities of different Serrasalmidae species and to understand the corresponding mechanisms. Two herbivorous species of Serrasalmidae, Piaractus brachypomus and Metynnis lippincottianus, produce sounds composed of a single pulse. The mechanism involved in these species is not yet understood. In contrast, the calls emitted by several species of Serrasalmus and Pygocentrus are harmonic sounds composed of several pulses without inter-pulse interval. Their mechanism results from the forced vibration of the swimbladder following the contraction of sonic muscles that are attached to tendons surrounding ventrally the bladder. Another species, Pygopristis denticulata, is able to produce two types of sounds. The first sound consists of several pulses with irregular pulse period and is likely produced by a sonic muscle inserting on the skull and on the rostral part of the swimbladder. The second sound is multi-pulsed and, contrary to all other sounds described here, possesses a high dominant frequency suggesting a mechanism that does not involve the swimbladder and that remains to be determined. According to these results, Serrasalmidae seems to contain many species able to produce sounds by means of different mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailThe cerato-mandibular ligament: an innovation for sound production and feeding in damselfishes (Pomacentridae).
Olivier, Damien ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg; Spanopoulos-Zarco, Milton et al

Conference (2014, December 12)

The success of a taxonomic group can be promoted by a key character that allows the group to interact with its environment in a different way and to potentially occupy new niches. The Pomacentridae ... [more ▼]

The success of a taxonomic group can be promoted by a key character that allows the group to interact with its environment in a different way and to potentially occupy new niches. The Pomacentridae possess a synapomorphic trait, the cerato-mandibular (c-md) ligament, which joins the hyoid bar to the inner part of the lower jaw. It has previously been shown that this ligament is a key trait in communication in damselfishes because it enables them to slam the oral jaws shut causing teeth collision and sound production. This specific behavior of mouth closing could, however, also be used for other tasks, such as feeding. Many territorial damselfishes are referred to as farmers, due to their ability to manage algal crops on which they feed. This study hypothesizes that the c-md ligament provides an advantage for grazing filamentous algae, and should thus be considered a key trait for farming behavior. The kinematic patterns associated with sound production and biting filamentous algae or attached animal prey are all based on the same mechanism and are associated with a slam of the oral jaws. We observed that transection of the c-md ligaments makes the fish unable to perform such actions. This study shows that the c-md ligament is a key trait both for sound production and for grazing activities in damselfishes. The buccal jaw slam enables the fish to perform accurate strikes on small filamentous algae. This kind of bite probably plays a major role in farming activity and allows grazing damselfishes to occupy distinct niches, possibly increasing their competitive evolutionary success. [less ▲]

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See detailEcological diversity of damselfishes (Pomacentridae) from Moorea
Gajdzik, Laura ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lepoint, Gilles ULg et al

Poster (2014, December)

The Pomacentridae (damselfishes) represents the 3rd most species-rich coral reef fish family, including 394 species spread worldwide. Recent studies suggested that damselfishes iteratively evolve along ... [more ▼]

The Pomacentridae (damselfishes) represents the 3rd most species-rich coral reef fish family, including 394 species spread worldwide. Recent studies suggested that damselfishes iteratively evolve along three main trophic guilds: “the pelagic feeders” feeding mainly on zooplankton, “the benthic feeders” grazing filamentous algae or biting coral polyps, and an “intermediate” group with species feeding on zooplankton, small benthic invertebrates and algae in variable proportions. Comparing the ecological diversity of damselfish communities among various geographical regions could assess such an iterative radiation. Within this context, the present study is a first attempt exploring the trophic diversity of damselfish community at Moorea Island (French Polynesia). The relationship between the trophic guilds, their habitat diversity and their behavior is evaluated. Habitat and behaviour of 16 damselfish species were described during transects along which different kinds of data were collected. For examples, the location within the reef (e.g. fringing or barrier reef), the depth, the substrate over which fishes are living or the solitary/gregarious habits were recorded. Diet of individuals was investigated by means of stomach content and stable isotopes analyses. Correlations between the dietary preferences and ecological data (habitat and behaviour) are given and the ecological diversity among trophic groups is compared. [less ▲]

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See detailThe cerato-mandibular ligament: a key functional trait for grazing in damselfishes (Pomacentridae)
Olivier, Damien ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg; Spanopoulos-Zarco, Milton et al

in Frontiers in Zoology (2014), 11(63), 1-14

Introduction: The success of a taxonomic group can be promoted by a key character that allows the group to interact with its environment in a different way and to potentially occupy new niches. The ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The success of a taxonomic group can be promoted by a key character that allows the group to interact with its environment in a different way and to potentially occupy new niches. The Pomacentridae possess a synapomorphic trait, the cerato-mandibular (c-md) ligament, which joins the hyoid bar to the inner part of the lower jaw. It has previously been shown that this ligament is a key trait in communication in damselfishes because it enables them to slam the oral jaws shut causing teeth collision and sound production. This specific behavior of mouth closing could, however, also be used for other tasks, such as feeding. Many territorial damselfishes are referred to as farmers, due to their ability to manage algal crops on which they feed. This study hypothesizes that the c-md ligament provides an advantage for grazing filamentous algae, and should thus be considered a key trait for farming behavior. Results: The kinematic patterns associated with sound production and biting filamentous algae or attached animal prey are all based on the same mechanism and are associated with a slam of the oral jaws. We observed that transection of the c-md ligaments makes the fish unable to perform such actions. We also counted biting rates on filamentous algae in fish with and without the c-md ligament and observed a drop of more than 80% in the latter. Conclusion: This study shows that the c-md ligament is a key trait both for sound production and for grazing activities in damselfishes. The buccal jaw slam enables the fish to perform accurate strikes on small filamentous algae. This kind of bite probably plays a major role in farming activity and allows grazing damselfishes to occupy distinct niches, possibly increasing their competitive evolutionary success. [less ▲]

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See detailSound production to electric discharge: sonic muscle evolution in progress in Synodontis spp. catfishes (Mochokidae)
Boyle, Kelly; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg

in Proceedings of the Royal Society B : Biological Sciences (2014), 281

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See detailTrait decoupling promotes evolutionary diversification of the trophic and acoustic system of damselfishes
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Olivier, Damien ULg; Litsios, Glenn et al

in Proceedings of the Royal Society B : Biological Sciences (2014)

Trait decoupling, wherein evolutionary release of constraints permits specialization of formerly integrated structures, represents a major conceptual framework for interpreting patterns of organismal ... [more ▼]

Trait decoupling, wherein evolutionary release of constraints permits specialization of formerly integrated structures, represents a major conceptual framework for interpreting patterns of organismal diversity. However, few empirical tests of this hypothesis exist. A central prediction, that the tempo of morphological evolution and ecological diversification should increase following decoupling events, remains inadequately tested. In damselfishes (Pomacentridae), a ceratomandibular ligament links the hyoid bar and lower jaws, coupling two main morphofunctional units directly involved in both feeding and sound production. Here, we test the decoupling hypothesis by examining the evolutionary consequences of the loss of the ceratomandibular ligament in multiple damselfish lineages. As predicted, we find that rates of morphological evolution of trophic structures increased following the loss of the ligament. However, this increase in evolutionary rate is not associated with an increase in trophic breadth, but rather with morphofunctional specialization for the capture of zooplanktonic prey. Lineages lacking the ceratomandibular ligament also shows different acoustic signals (i.e. higher variation of pulse periods) from others, resulting in an increase of the acoustic diversity across the family. Our results support the idea that trait decoupling can increase morphological and behavioral diversity through increased specialization rather than the generation of novel ecotypes. [less ▲]

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See detailMicroplastics contamination in two planktivorous and commercial fish species
Collard, France ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Das, Krishna ULg

Poster (2014, May 13)

Plastic pollution is a huge environmental concern and affects each marine ecosystem. Plastics are produced by millions of tonnes each year in the world and finally accumulate in oceans. They adsorb many ... [more ▼]

Plastic pollution is a huge environmental concern and affects each marine ecosystem. Plastics are produced by millions of tonnes each year in the world and finally accumulate in oceans. They adsorb many persistent organic pollutants, cause external and internal wounds and provoke blockage of the digestive tract of marine mammals, birds and turtles. Plastics can also threaten marine organisms of small size class in the same way by fragmenting in smaller parts that result in microplastics of less than five millimetres. These microplastics are of the same order of magnitude than plankton and can thus be ingested by filter-feeders, suspension-filters and planktivorous organisms such as fish. Few studies deal with microplastics ingestion by fish and even less by commercial fish species. The herring (Clupea harengus) and the sardine (Sardina pilchardus) were respectively the third and the eighth most caught fish species in the world in 2009. We focused our research on these two species which are of economic importance. We sampled around thirty individuals of each species in the Channel and in the North Sea in January 2013. The stomach contents were digested by sodium hypochlorite and then analyzed. Microplastics were characterized by size, colour and shape. The results of these analyses will highlight the need for studies about microplastics ingestion by planktivorous species. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the relationships between characteristics of the vertebral column of different cetaceans and their ecology: A preliminary study.
Gillet, Amandine ULg; Ninane, Catherine ULg; Remy, François ULg et al

Poster (2014, April)

Ecomorphology is the study of the relationships between functional design and the environment. One of its aims is to understand how the environmental factors can constraint the performance of an organism ... [more ▼]

Ecomorphology is the study of the relationships between functional design and the environment. One of its aims is to understand how the environmental factors can constraint the performance of an organism or act on its phenotype. Different studies have already showed in different cetaceans that the number and shape of vertebrae can reflect the stiffness of the body and consequently can impact their swimming mode. The aim of this preliminary study is to establish relationships between characteristics of the vertebral column of different cetaceans and their ecology. To this purpose, we have studied meristic and morphometric data on the vertebrae (centrum length, height and width, neural and haemal spine height and the transverse process length) of different species of mysticetes and odontocetes coming from the Aquarium-Museum of Liège and Royal Institute of Natural Sciences of Bruxelles. Preliminary results showed the distinction of three morphotypes: firstly, the active, cruising, fast swimmers with rigid body, secondly, the maneuverers, slow swimmers with flexible body and thirdly, the steady swimmers. [less ▲]

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See detailEcomorphology of the vertebral column: preliminary study
Gillet, Amandine; Ninane, Catherine; Zaeytydt, Esther et al

Poster (2014, April)

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