References of "Parmentier, Eric"
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See detailClownfishes
Colleye, Orphal ULg; Iwata, Eri; Parmentier, Eric ULg

in Frederich, Bruno; Parmentier, Eric (Eds.) Biology of Damselfishes (in press)

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See detailHearing in Damselfi shes
Colleye, Orphal ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Kever, Loïc ULg

in Frederich, Bruno; Parmentier, Eric (Eds.) Biology of Damselfishes (in press)

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See detailSound Production in Damselfishes
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lecchini, David; Mann, David

in Frederich, Bruno; Parmentier, Eric (Eds.) Meet the Damselfishes (in press)

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See detailAcoustic indices provide information on the status of coral reefs: an example from Moorea Island in the South Pacific
Bertucci, Frédéric; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lecellier, Gaël et al

in Scientific Reports (2016), 6(33326), 1-9

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See detailTrophic Ecology of Damselfishes
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Olivier, Damien ULg; Gajdzik, Laura ULg et al

in Frederich, Bruno; Parmentier, Eric (Eds.) Biology of Damselfishes (2016)

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See detailCerato-Mandibular Ligament: a Key Trait in Damselfishes?
Olivier, Damien ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg

in Frederich, Bruno; Parmentier, Eric (Eds.) Biology of Damselfishes (2016)

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See detailMeet the Damselfishes
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg

in Frederich, Bruno; Parmentier, Eric (Eds.) Biology of Damselfishes (2016)

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See detailInsight into biting diversity to capture benthic prey in damselfishes (Pomacentridae)
Olivier, Damien ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg

in Zoologischer Anzeiger (2016), 264

The cerato-mandibular (c-md) ligament, joining the hyoid bar to the coronoid process of the angular, allows Pomacentridae to slam their mouth shut in a few milliseconds. Previous works have revealed that ... [more ▼]

The cerato-mandibular (c-md) ligament, joining the hyoid bar to the coronoid process of the angular, allows Pomacentridae to slam their mouth shut in a few milliseconds. Previous works have revealed that such a mechanism is used to feed, but some variability in biting patterns has been observed between two damselfish species. The pelagic feeder Amphiprion clarkii performs two different kinematic patterns to bite fixed prey, one that does not depend on the c-md ligament (biting-1) and one that does (biting-2). The benthic feeder Stegastes rectifraenum only performs biting-2. The present study aims to shed light on the occurrence of biting-2 in the feeding behaviour of Pomacentridae. To test our hypothesis that biting-2 would be the only biting pattern for benthic feeders, we compared biting behaviours among four species: one pelagic feeder, A. clarkii, and three benthic feeders, Neoglyphidodon nigroris, Stegastes leucostictus and S. rectifraenum. Our results showed that the four species were able to perform biting-2, but they do not support that the use of this pattern is related to trophic habits. Contrary to S. rectifraenum, the two other benthic feeders randomly used biting-1 and biting-2 patterns, similar to A. clarkii. Two hypotheses are discussed for explaining this variability within Pomacentridae. Finally, it has been recently shown that some damselfishes do not possess the c-md ligament. We therefore included two species lacking the c-md ligament (Chromis chromis and Abudefduf troschelii) in our study and we demonstrate our expectation that they are unable to perform biting-2. [less ▲]

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See detailBiology of Damselfishes
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg

Book published by CRC-Press, Taylor & Francis (2016)

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See detailInterspecific variation of warning calls in piranhas: comparative analysis
Mélotte, Geoffrey ULg; Michel, Christian ULg; Vigouroux, Régis et al

Poster (2016, July)

Fish sounds are often considered as species-specific with unique temporal and spectral features. Differences between acoustic signals of closely related species could be considered as pre-zygotic barrier ... [more ▼]

Fish sounds are often considered as species-specific with unique temporal and spectral features. Differences between acoustic signals of closely related species could be considered as pre-zygotic barrier and could be related to the evolutionary history of the species. In the present study, sounds were recorded and compared in eight piranha species (Serrasalmus elongatus, Serrasalmus marginatus, Serrasalmus compressus, Serrasalmus manueli, Serrasalmus spilopleura, Serrasalmus rhombeus, Serrasalmus eigenmanni and Pygocentrus nattereri) in order to evaluate the potential role of acoustic communication as a driving force in the clade diversification. The same kind of sound-producing mechanism was found in all the species: sonic muscles originate on vertebrae and attach to a tendon surrounding ventrally the bladder. Contractions of the sound-producing muscles force swimbladder vibration. Having the same kind of sound-producing mechanism, the calling features of the eight piranha species show logically many common characteristics. In all the species, the calls are harmonic sounds composed of several pulses without inter-pulse interval. It was possible to discern species-specific sounds, but the differences among species could be, in part, explained by the size. Only the sounds of S. elongatus and S. manueli are really distinguishable from the other species. Serrasalmus elongatus differed by having a higher number of pulses and high-pitched fundamental frequency, whereas S. manueli differed by having long pulse periods and a low fundamental frequency. In the framework of this study, acoustic communication cannot be considered as the main driving force in the diversification process of piranhas. Behavioral studies are however needed to clearly understand the eventual role of the calls during the spawning events. [less ▲]

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See detailAuditory evoked potential audiograms in post-settlement stage individuals of coral reef fishes
Colleye, Orphal ULg; Kever, Loïc ULg; Lecchini, David et al

in Journal of Experimental Marine Biology & Ecology (2016), 483

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See detailMechanisms involved in pearlfish resistance to holothuroid toxins
Brasseur, Lola; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Caulier, Guillaume et al

in Marine Biology (2016), 163(129), 1-14

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See detailChapter 2 - Fish Sound Production: Insights
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Fine, Michael

in Suthers, Roderick; Fitch, Temcuseh; Fay, Richard (Eds.) et al Vertebrate Sound Production and Acoustic Communication (2016)

In addition to briefly reviewing sound-producing mechanisms, this chapter focuses on an under-appreciated evolutionary process, exaptation, which could aid in understanding the independent origins and ... [more ▼]

In addition to briefly reviewing sound-producing mechanisms, this chapter focuses on an under-appreciated evolutionary process, exaptation, which could aid in understanding the independent origins and high diversity of sound-producing mechanisms in fishes. Existing anatomical structures first used in non-voluntary sound production provide advantages that result in further selection and refinement of sophisticated sonic organs. Moreover, comparisons of the relationships between fish size and spectral features in multiple not phylogenetically related species highlight two acoustic patterns. In species using superfast muscles, the slope of the relationship between fish size and sound frequency is weak (1°–5°) so that emitter size is unlikely inferred from call frequency. In other species that stridulate or use bones or tendons to stimulate the swimbladder, the high slopes (25°–80°) indicate major differences in the call frequencies within a species. These signals likely convey important information (size and potential fitness of the emitter) to conspecific receivers. [less ▲]

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See detailMicroplastics contamination in three planktivorous and commercial fish species
Collard, France ULg; Das, Krishna ULg; Gilbert, Bernard ULg et al

Poster (2016, May)

In 2014, 311 million tonnes of plastics were produced worldwide while it is estimated that 10% ended up in the oceans. Plastics adsorb many pollutants, cause entanglements in many vertebrates and provoke ... [more ▼]

In 2014, 311 million tonnes of plastics were produced worldwide while it is estimated that 10% ended up in the oceans. Plastics adsorb many pollutants, cause entanglements in many vertebrates and provoke blockage of the digestive tract of marine mammals, birds and turtles. Plastics also fragment in smaller parts, forming microplastics (<5 mm). These microplastics have the same size than planktonic organisms and can thus be ingested by filter-feeders and planktivorous organisms including fish. Although planktivorous Clupeiforme species are the most fished species in the world (17 million tonnes in 2013), the possible impact of microplastic ingestion on this group has received little attention. The aim of this study was to quantify and to characterize the ingested anthropogenic particles (AP) in herrings (Clupea harengus), sardines (Sardina pilchardus) and anchovies (Engraulis encrasicolus). Twenty individuals of each species were sampled. Herrings and sardines were caught in the Channel and in the North Sea in January 2013 and in January 2014. Anchovies were sampled in July 2013. The stomach contents were digested by sodium hypochlorite to isolate AP and then they were analysed by Raman spectroscopy and measured. AP were constituted of microplastics (MP) and cellulose fibres, sometimes associated with dyes. We found several plastic families: polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene, polyacrylonitrile, polyethylene terephthalate, polyamide and poly(butyl methacrylate). MP occurred in 35%, 50% and 40% of stomach contents of anchovies, sardines and herrings, respectively. Anchovies ingested bigger AP (2 mm) than the two other species. MP was in majority PE followed by PP. Our study shows that highly commercial species are exposed to MP. Further research is needed as MP are transport medium for organic pollutants and their fate once in the organism is unknown. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom commensalism to parasitism in Carapidae (Ophidiiformes): heterochronic modes of development?
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lanterbecq, Déborah; Eeckhaut, Igor

in PeerJ (2016), 4

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See detailSciaenops ocellatus: Daily and seasonal sound variation during spawning in aquaculture.
Henry, Séverine ULg; Falguière, Jean Claude; Devillers, Samson et al

Poster (2016, February)

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See detailNew insights into sound production in Carapus mourlani (Carapidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Lecchini, David

in Bulletin of Marine Science (2016), 92(3),

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