References of "Parmentier, Eric"
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See detailA morphological novelty for feeding and sound production in the yellowtail clownfish
Olivier, Damien ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg; Herrel, Anthony et al

in Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Comparative Experimental Biology (in press)

The yellowtail clownfish Amphiprion clarkii is able to close its mouth very quickly by means of the cerato-mandibular (c-md) ligament, a synapomorphic trait of Pomacentridae joining the hyoid bar to the ... [more ▼]

The yellowtail clownfish Amphiprion clarkii is able to close its mouth very quickly by means of the cerato-mandibular (c-md) ligament, a synapomorphic trait of Pomacentridae joining the hyoid bar to the medial part of the lower jaw. This fast closure induces tooth collision, thus producing sounds that the clownfish uses during agonistic behaviors. To investigate whether this rapid jaw movement is also used during feeding, we analyzed the kinematics of sound production and feeding. Sound production, feeding on live planktonic prey, and feeding on food attached to tweezers were filmed with a high-speed camera. Three kinds of kinematic patterns were detected and were associated with the two different types of food presented: one performed to catch planktonic prey (PP), and two (called B-1 and B-2) to bite attached food items. The kinematic pattern of B-2 is similar to that observed during sound production (SP) and the transection of the c-md ligament highlights that sound production and biting-2 motions are dependent on this morphological trait. Our data show that the c-md ligament in addition to its role in sound production allows duplication of the mouth closing mechanism during feeding. This highlights the key role played by the c-md ligament in sound production and feeding on attached prey. [less ▲]

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See detailSound production in Onuxodon fowleri (Carapidae) and its amplification by the host shell
Kever, Loïc ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Lugli, Marco et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2014), 217

Onuxodon species are well known for living inside pearl oysters. As in other carapids, their anatomy highlights their ability to make sounds but sound production has never been documented in Onuxodon ... [more ▼]

Onuxodon species are well known for living inside pearl oysters. As in other carapids, their anatomy highlights their ability to make sounds but sound production has never been documented in Onuxodon. This paper describes sound production in Onuxodon fowleri as well as the anatomy of the sound production apparatus. Single-pulsed sounds and multiple-pulsed sounds that sometimes last more than 3 s were recorded in the field and in captivity (Makemo Island, French Polynesia). These pulses are characterized by a broadband frequency spectrum from 100 to 1000 Hz. Onuxodon fowleri is mainly characterized by its ability to modulate the pulse period, meaning that this species can produce pulsed sounds and tonal-like sounds using the same mechanism. In addition, the sound can be remarkably amplified by the shell cavity (peak gain can exceed 10 dB for some frequencies). The sonic apparatus of O. fowleri is characterized by a rocker bone in front of the swimbladder, modified vertebrae and epineurals, and two pairs of sonic muscles, one of which (primary sonic muscle) inserts on the rocker bone. The latter structure, which is absent in other carapid genera, appears to be sexually dimorphic suggesting differences in sound production in males and females. Sound production in O. fowleri could be an example of adaptation where an animal exploits features of its environment to enhance communication. [less ▲]

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See detailThe cerato-mandibular ligament: an innovation for sound production and feeding in damselfishes (Pomacentridae).
Olivier, Damien ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg; Spanopoulos-Zarco, Milton et al

Conference (2014, December 12)

The success of a taxonomic group can be promoted by a key character that allows the group to interact with its environment in a different way and to potentially occupy new niches. The Pomacentridae ... [more ▼]

The success of a taxonomic group can be promoted by a key character that allows the group to interact with its environment in a different way and to potentially occupy new niches. The Pomacentridae possess a synapomorphic trait, the cerato-mandibular (c-md) ligament, which joins the hyoid bar to the inner part of the lower jaw. It has previously been shown that this ligament is a key trait in communication in damselfishes because it enables them to slam the oral jaws shut causing teeth collision and sound production. This specific behavior of mouth closing could, however, also be used for other tasks, such as feeding. Many territorial damselfishes are referred to as farmers, due to their ability to manage algal crops on which they feed. This study hypothesizes that the c-md ligament provides an advantage for grazing filamentous algae, and should thus be considered a key trait for farming behavior. The kinematic patterns associated with sound production and biting filamentous algae or attached animal prey are all based on the same mechanism and are associated with a slam of the oral jaws. We observed that transection of the c-md ligaments makes the fish unable to perform such actions. This study shows that the c-md ligament is a key trait both for sound production and for grazing activities in damselfishes. The buccal jaw slam enables the fish to perform accurate strikes on small filamentous algae. This kind of bite probably plays a major role in farming activity and allows grazing damselfishes to occupy distinct niches, possibly increasing their competitive evolutionary success. [less ▲]

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See detailSound production in piranhas and relatives: preliminary results
Melotte, Geoffrey ULg; Michel, Christian ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg

Poster (2014, December 12)

Acoustic communication plays an important role in the life of many teleost species where it is mainly involved in agonistic and/or courtship behaviour(s). Despite the large number of species in the family ... [more ▼]

Acoustic communication plays an important role in the life of many teleost species where it is mainly involved in agonistic and/or courtship behaviour(s). Despite the large number of species in the family Serrasalmidae (92 species), sound production has been described only in some of them, particularly in the genera Serrasalmus and Pygocentrus. The aim of this study is to investigate the sound producing abilities of different Serrasalmidae species and to understand the corresponding mechanisms. Two herbivorous species of Serrasalmidae, Piaractus brachypomus and Metynnis lippincottianus, produce sounds composed of a single pulse. The mechanism involved in these species is not yet understood. In contrast, the calls emitted by several species of Serrasalmus and Pygocentrus are harmonic sounds composed of several pulses without inter-pulse interval. Their mechanism results from the forced vibration of the swimbladder following the contraction of sonic muscles that are attached to tendons surrounding ventrally the bladder. Another species, Pygopristis denticulata, is able to produce two types of sounds. The first sound consists of several pulses with irregular pulse period and is likely produced by a sonic muscle inserting on the skull and on the rostral part of the swimbladder. The second sound is multi-pulsed and, contrary to all other sounds described here, possesses a high dominant frequency suggesting a mechanism that does not involve the swimbladder and that remains to be determined. According to these results, Serrasalmidae seems to contain many species able to produce sounds by means of different mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailEcological diversity of damselfishes (Pomacentridae) from Moorea
Gajdzik, Laura ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lepoint, Gilles ULg et al

Poster (2014, December)

The Pomacentridae (damselfishes) represents the 3rd most species-rich coral reef fish family, including 394 species spread worldwide. Recent studies suggested that damselfishes iteratively evolve along ... [more ▼]

The Pomacentridae (damselfishes) represents the 3rd most species-rich coral reef fish family, including 394 species spread worldwide. Recent studies suggested that damselfishes iteratively evolve along three main trophic guilds: “the pelagic feeders” feeding mainly on zooplankton, “the benthic feeders” grazing filamentous algae or biting coral polyps, and an “intermediate” group with species feeding on zooplankton, small benthic invertebrates and algae in variable proportions. Comparing the ecological diversity of damselfish communities among various geographical regions could assess such an iterative radiation. Within this context, the present study is a first attempt exploring the trophic diversity of damselfish community at Moorea Island (French Polynesia). The relationship between the trophic guilds, their habitat diversity and their behavior is evaluated. Habitat and behaviour of 16 damselfish species were described during transects along which different kinds of data were collected. For examples, the location within the reef (e.g. fringing or barrier reef), the depth, the substrate over which fishes are living or the solitary/gregarious habits were recorded. Diet of individuals was investigated by means of stomach content and stable isotopes analyses. Correlations between the dietary preferences and ecological data (habitat and behaviour) are given and the ecological diversity among trophic groups is compared. [less ▲]

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See detailThe cerato-mandibular ligament: a key functional trait for grazing in damselfishes (Pomacentridae)
Olivier, Damien ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg; Spanopoulos-Zarco, Milton et al

in Frontiers in Zoology (2014), 11(63), 1-14

Introduction: The success of a taxonomic group can be promoted by a key character that allows the group to interact with its environment in a different way and to potentially occupy new niches. The ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The success of a taxonomic group can be promoted by a key character that allows the group to interact with its environment in a different way and to potentially occupy new niches. The Pomacentridae possess a synapomorphic trait, the cerato-mandibular (c-md) ligament, which joins the hyoid bar to the inner part of the lower jaw. It has previously been shown that this ligament is a key trait in communication in damselfishes because it enables them to slam the oral jaws shut causing teeth collision and sound production. This specific behavior of mouth closing could, however, also be used for other tasks, such as feeding. Many territorial damselfishes are referred to as farmers, due to their ability to manage algal crops on which they feed. This study hypothesizes that the c-md ligament provides an advantage for grazing filamentous algae, and should thus be considered a key trait for farming behavior. Results: The kinematic patterns associated with sound production and biting filamentous algae or attached animal prey are all based on the same mechanism and are associated with a slam of the oral jaws. We observed that transection of the c-md ligaments makes the fish unable to perform such actions. We also counted biting rates on filamentous algae in fish with and without the c-md ligament and observed a drop of more than 80% in the latter. Conclusion: This study shows that the c-md ligament is a key trait both for sound production and for grazing activities in damselfishes. The buccal jaw slam enables the fish to perform accurate strikes on small filamentous algae. This kind of bite probably plays a major role in farming activity and allows grazing damselfishes to occupy distinct niches, possibly increasing their competitive evolutionary success. [less ▲]

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See detailSound production to electric discharge: sonic muscle evolution in progress in Synodontis spp. catfishes (Mochokidae)
Boyle, Kelly; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg

in Proceedings of the Royal Society B : Biological Sciences (2014), 281

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See detailTrait decoupling promotes evolutionary diversification of the trophic and acoustic system of damselfishes
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Olivier, Damien ULg; Litsios, Glenn et al

in Proceedings of the Royal Society B : Biological Sciences (2014)

Trait decoupling, wherein evolutionary release of constraints permits specialization of formerly integrated structures, represents a major conceptual framework for interpreting patterns of organismal ... [more ▼]

Trait decoupling, wherein evolutionary release of constraints permits specialization of formerly integrated structures, represents a major conceptual framework for interpreting patterns of organismal diversity. However, few empirical tests of this hypothesis exist. A central prediction, that the tempo of morphological evolution and ecological diversification should increase following decoupling events, remains inadequately tested. In damselfishes (Pomacentridae), a ceratomandibular ligament links the hyoid bar and lower jaws, coupling two main morphofunctional units directly involved in both feeding and sound production. Here, we test the decoupling hypothesis by examining the evolutionary consequences of the loss of the ceratomandibular ligament in multiple damselfish lineages. As predicted, we find that rates of morphological evolution of trophic structures increased following the loss of the ligament. However, this increase in evolutionary rate is not associated with an increase in trophic breadth, but rather with morphofunctional specialization for the capture of zooplanktonic prey. Lineages lacking the ceratomandibular ligament also shows different acoustic signals (i.e. higher variation of pulse periods) from others, resulting in an increase of the acoustic diversity across the family. Our results support the idea that trait decoupling can increase morphological and behavioral diversity through increased specialization rather than the generation of novel ecotypes. [less ▲]

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See detailMicroplastics contamination in two planktivorous and commercial fish species
Collard, France ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Das, Krishna ULg

Poster (2014, May 13)

Plastic pollution is a huge environmental concern and affects each marine ecosystem. Plastics are produced by millions of tonnes each year in the world and finally accumulate in oceans. They adsorb many ... [more ▼]

Plastic pollution is a huge environmental concern and affects each marine ecosystem. Plastics are produced by millions of tonnes each year in the world and finally accumulate in oceans. They adsorb many persistent organic pollutants, cause external and internal wounds and provoke blockage of the digestive tract of marine mammals, birds and turtles. Plastics can also threaten marine organisms of small size class in the same way by fragmenting in smaller parts that result in microplastics of less than five millimetres. These microplastics are of the same order of magnitude than plankton and can thus be ingested by filter-feeders, suspension-filters and planktivorous organisms such as fish. Few studies deal with microplastics ingestion by fish and even less by commercial fish species. The herring (Clupea harengus) and the sardine (Sardina pilchardus) were respectively the third and the eighth most caught fish species in the world in 2009. We focused our research on these two species which are of economic importance. We sampled around thirty individuals of each species in the Channel and in the North Sea in January 2013. The stomach contents were digested by sodium hypochlorite and then analyzed. Microplastics were characterized by size, colour and shape. The results of these analyses will highlight the need for studies about microplastics ingestion by planktivorous species. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the relationships between characteristics of the vertebral column of different cetaceans and their ecology: A preliminary study.
Gillet, Amandine ULg; Ninane, Catherine ULg; Remy, François ULg et al

Poster (2014, April)

Ecomorphology is the study of the relationships between functional design and the environment. One of its aims is to understand how the environmental factors can constraint the performance of an organism ... [more ▼]

Ecomorphology is the study of the relationships between functional design and the environment. One of its aims is to understand how the environmental factors can constraint the performance of an organism or act on its phenotype. Different studies have already showed in different cetaceans that the number and shape of vertebrae can reflect the stiffness of the body and consequently can impact their swimming mode. The aim of this preliminary study is to establish relationships between characteristics of the vertebral column of different cetaceans and their ecology. To this purpose, we have studied meristic and morphometric data on the vertebrae (centrum length, height and width, neural and haemal spine height and the transverse process length) of different species of mysticetes and odontocetes coming from the Aquarium-Museum of Liège and Royal Institute of Natural Sciences of Bruxelles. Preliminary results showed the distinction of three morphotypes: firstly, the active, cruising, fast swimmers with rigid body, secondly, the maneuverers, slow swimmers with flexible body and thirdly, the steady swimmers. [less ▲]

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See detailEcomorphology of the vertebral column: preliminary study
Gillet, Amandine; Ninane, Catherine; Zaeytydt, Esther et al

Poster (2014, April)

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See detailMicroplastics caught in herring gill rakers: illustration by scanning electron microscopy
Collard, France ULg; Das, Krishna ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg

Conference (2014, March 07)

Plastics are produced in huge quantity (280 million of tons in 2012) and more than 10% end up in the oceans. It is estimated that between 60 and 80% of all marine debris are plastics. Plastics are ... [more ▼]

Plastics are produced in huge quantity (280 million of tons in 2012) and more than 10% end up in the oceans. It is estimated that between 60 and 80% of all marine debris are plastics. Plastics are persistent and have accumulated in the oceans for several decades. Plastics may adverse wildlife in many ways: they can be ingested by marine vertebrates and cause internal wounds in the digestive tract. Plastics are also vectors of organic pollutants including. Once ingested, plastics may release these pollutants in the organism. Plastics present in the marine environment fragment in small pieces by mechanical stress and UV radiation leading to the so-called microplastics smaller than 5 mm. Little is known about microplastics ingestion and toxicity in planktivorous fish such as the herring, Clupea harengus. Planktivorous fish have gill rakers, which may function as a trap for microplastics. This study aims to describe and characterise microplastics present on gill rakers of the herring, Clupea harengus. Ten gill cavities were sampled in January 2013 in the Channel and the North Sea during a fishery campaign organized by the IFREMER. Gills cavities were placed in a fixating solution until preparation for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM was used in order to detect microplastics which are too small to be observed by a dissection microscope, to compare them with the distance between gill rakers and to characterise the surface and the shape of microplastics. Scanning electron microscopy revealed large variety of microplastics, which lengths ranged from 0.05 to 5mm. Relationship between microplastics length and distance between gill rakers was analysed on the same branchial arch. The present study revealed the presence of microplastics in an edible species of high economic value and raise question about potential impact on the herring and its consumers, including human beings. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of the ultrastructure of sonic muscles: a kind of neoteny?
Millot, Sandie; Parmentier, Eric ULg

in BMC Evolutionary Biology (2014), 14

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See detailNew insights into the role of the pharyngeal jaw apparatus in the sound producing mechanism of Haemulon flavolineatum (Haemulidae)
Bertucci, Frédéric ULg; Ruppé, Laetitia; Van Wassenbergh, Sam et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2014), 217

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See detailA superfast muscle in the complex sonic apparatus of Ophidion rochei (Ophidiiformes): histological and physiological approaches
Kever, Loïc ULg; Boyle, Kelly; Dragicevic, Branko et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2014), 214

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See detailHearing capacities and otolith size in two ophidiiform species (Ophidion rochei and Carapus acus)
Kever, Loïc ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Herrel, Anthony et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2014), 217

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See detailLes sons de contact de l'ombrine côtière - Umbrina cirrosa (Linné, 1758)
Lagardère, Jean-Paul; Parmentier, Eric ULg

in Bulletin de la Société de Borda (2014), 514

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See detailSound production in Sciaenops ocellatus: Preliminary study for the development of acoustic cues in aquaculture
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Tock, Jérémy; Falguière, Jean-Claude et al

in Aquaculture (2014), 432

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