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See detailAnalogical mapping across modalities in children with specific language impairment (SLI)
Leroy, Sandrine ULg; Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULg

in Research in Developmental Disabilities (in press)

Analogical mapping is a domain-general cognitive process found in language development, and more particularly in the abstraction of construction schemas. Analogical mapping is considered as the general ... [more ▼]

Analogical mapping is a domain-general cognitive process found in language development, and more particularly in the abstraction of construction schemas. Analogical mapping is considered as the general cognitive process which consists in the alignment of two or several sequences in order to detect their common relational structure and generalize it to new items. The current study investigated analogical mapping across modalities in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Nineteen children with SLI and their age-matched peers were administered two tasks: a linguistic analogical reasoning task (composed of syllables) and a similar non-linguistic analogical reasoning task (composed of pictures). In the two tasks, the items presented were divided into two groups: items with perceptual cues and items without perceptual cues. Children had to complete a sequence sharing the same relational structure as previously presented sequences. Results showed an expected group effect with poorer performance for children with SLI compared to children with typical language development (TLD). Results corroborate hypotheses suggesting that children with SLI have difficulties with analogical mapping, which may hinder the abstraction of construction schemas. Interestingly, whereas no interaction effect between group and modality (linguistic vs. non-linguistic) was revealed, a triple interaction Group*Modality*Perceptual support was observed. In the non-linguistic task, the performance of children with SLI was the same for items with and without perceptual clues, but in the linguistic task they performed more poorly for items without perceptual cues compared to items with perceptual cues. The results and limits of the study are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailProcedural learning across modalities in French-speaking children with specific language impairment
Gabriel, Audrey ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg; Parisse, Christophe et al

in Applied Psycholinguistics (2014)

It has been suggested that the language problems encountered in specific language impairment (SLI) arise from basal ganglia abnormalities that lead to impaired procedural memory. However, recent serial ... [more ▼]

It has been suggested that the language problems encountered in specific language impairment (SLI) arise from basal ganglia abnormalities that lead to impaired procedural memory. However, recent serial reaction time (SRT) studies did not reveal any differences between the SLI and typically developing (TD) groups on the measures of procedural memory linked to visual sequence learning. In this paper, 16 children with and without SLI were compared on two versions of SRT tasks: a visual task and an auditory one. The results showed that children with SLI were as fast as their TD peers in both modalities. All of the children obtained similar specific sequence learning indices, indicating that they were able to detect regularities in both modalities. Although children with SLI were as accurate as their TD peers for the visual SRT task, they made more errors than their TD peers in auditory SRT conditions. The results indicate that, in relation to procedural memory, the core of the impairment in SLI is not linked to difficulties in the detection of regularities. We argue that when children with SLI present some difficulties, the children’s weaknesses might depend on the type of processing involved (e.g., tasks involving auditory sequences). [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of the frequency of functional markers on repetitive imitation of syntactic constructions in children with specific language impairment, from their own language productions
Leroy, Sandrine ULg; Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULg

in Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics (2013), 27(6-7), 508-520

Several studies provide considerable insight into the role that frequency plays in language development. However, no study has investigated the direct relationship between frequency and grammatical ... [more ▼]

Several studies provide considerable insight into the role that frequency plays in language development. However, no study has investigated the direct relationship between frequency and grammatical acquisition in children with specific language impairment (SLI). In this study, we focus specifically on the influence of the frequency of functional words on the ability of children with SLI to produce grammatical constructions based on the children's own previous production but containing previously unused functional words. To test our hypothesis, the children were administered an imitative repetition task, tailored to their current level of language development. Results showed that children with SLI performed more poorly than language-matched children with typical language development. The difference between the two groups was more marked when the previously unused functional words were infrequent rather than frequent. Consequently, it would seem that the token frequency of functional words influences grammatical acquisition in children with SLI. The results and their implications for linguistic theories are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailLack of generalization as explicative factor of morphosyntactic difficulties in children with SLI: a longitudinal study
Leroy, Sandrine ULg; Parisse, Christophe; Marchat, Aurélie et al

Poster (2013, June)

Background. Constructivist approach (Goldberg, 2006; Tomasello, 2003) postulates that children build their linguistic system from their own linguistic experience. To be productive with their language ... [more ▼]

Background. Constructivist approach (Goldberg, 2006; Tomasello, 2003) postulates that children build their linguistic system from their own linguistic experience. To be productive with their language, children have to generalize construction schemas to never heard items. Because children with SLI show limited morphosyntactic creativity and variability, we hypothesized that they would have difficulties to generalize their construction schemas, which would hinder their access to the most abstract level of the linguistic competence. Our aim was to test whether children with SLI had more difficulties than children with TLD to generalize a schema to new items. Methods. Seven children with SLI matched with 6 children TLD based on linguistic age were recorded for this study. Two steps were repeated at three different moments spread out three years. The first step consisted in a recording of a parent/child interaction at their house. All interactions were transcribed and analyzed. The second step consisted in the creation of two tasks from each child’s own productions: an utterance repetition task and a priming task. Tasks were individualized. Items were created from schemas considered as “acquired” and schemas considered as “non-acquired”. Results. Priming task. Current statistical analyses revealed a significant “Group” effect, a significant “Time” effect and a no significant “Group” by “Time” effect. Analyses revealed a significant “Structure” effect and a significant “Group” by “Structure” effect. Difference between the two groups was more marked for items with “non-acquired” schemas. Repetition task. The same results were obtained; except for “Time” variable (no significant effect). Discussion. The two groups had more difficulties to generalize non-acquired schemas to new items, but children with SLI seemed to have more difficulties, which could mean that their productivity with new schemas was more hindered. Consequently, results are compatible with our hypothesis suggesting that children with SLI have more difficulties for generalizing a schema to new items. [less ▲]

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See detailAdaptation française du LARSP
Prigent, Gaïd ULg; Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULg

Scientific conference (2013, April 16)

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See detailThe influence of the token frequency on the generalization of construction schemas in French-speaking children with SLI
Leroy, Sandrine ULg; Parisse, Christophe; Moulin, Mélissa et al

Poster (2012, June)

Constructivist approach (Goldberg, 1995 ; Tomasello, 2003) postulates that children build their linguistic system from their own linguistic experience. To be productive with their language, children have ... [more ▼]

Constructivist approach (Goldberg, 1995 ; Tomasello, 2003) postulates that children build their linguistic system from their own linguistic experience. To be productive with their language, children have to generalize construction schemas to never heard items. Because children with SLI seem to show limited morphosyntactic creativity and variability, we hypothesize that they would have difficulties to generalize their construction schemas what would hinder their access to the most abstract level of their linguistic competence. Given this lack of productivity of construction schemas in children with SLI, they would produce more lexicalized forms than abstract form what would lead to a limitation of the linguistic competence. The aim of our study was to test if children with SLI had more difficulties than children with typical language development (TLD) to generalize a schema to new items. Given the role of the token frequency in the abstraction of construction schemas (cf. Bybee, 1995), we decided to create a task in which we manipulated this variable. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalogical reasoning in children with specific language impairment
Leroy, Sandrine ULg; Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULg

in Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics (2012), 26(4),

Usage-based theory considers analogical reasoning as a cognitive process required in language development. We hypothesized that difficulties with analogical reasoning could hinder the abstraction of ... [more ▼]

Usage-based theory considers analogical reasoning as a cognitive process required in language development. We hypothesized that difficulties with analogical reasoning could hinder the abstraction of construction schemas, thus slowing down morphosyntactic development for children with specific language impairment (SLI). We also hypothesized, in accordance with usage-based theory, that the same analogy mechanism is shared by linguistic and non-linguistic processes. The current study investigated the performance of 15 children with SLI in comparison with age-matched peers on a nonlinguistic analogical reasoning task. Our experimental setting targeted two prerequisites of analogical reasoning: structural alignment and the discovery of relational similarity in comparison with perceptual similarity. The results obtained are compatible with our hypotheses according to which children with SLI would encounter problems building more abstract construction schemas, related to difficulties with analogical reasoning. The study also shows that children with SLI have specific cognitive difficulties regardless of their linguistic development. [less ▲]

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See detailF-LARSP 1.0: An Adaptation of the LARSP Language Profile for French.
Maillart, Christelle ULg; Parisse, Christophe; Tommerdahl, Jodi

in Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics (2012), 2

The LARSP (Language Assessment, Remediation and Screening Procedure) (Crystal et al., 1976) is a linguistic profile commonly used by researchers and clinicians to carry out detailed analyses of the ... [more ▼]

The LARSP (Language Assessment, Remediation and Screening Procedure) (Crystal et al., 1976) is a linguistic profile commonly used by researchers and clinicians to carry out detailed analyses of the grammar and morphology of children’s spontaneous language samples. This paper discusses the methods used to adapt the profile from English to French using a large corpus of child language in order to accurately assign morphosyntactic structures to age-based stages. [less ▲]

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See detailF-LARSP: A Computerized Tool for Measuring Morphosyntactic Abilities in French.
Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULg; Tommerdahl, Jodi

in Ball, Martin J.; Crystal, David; Fletcher, Paul (Eds.) Assessing Grammar: The Languages of LARSP. (2012)

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See detailMorphosyntactic disorders as a consequence of categorization difficulty in children with specific language impairment
Leroy, Sandrine ULg; Parisse, Christophe; Duquet, Adèle et al

Poster (2011, July 21)

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See detailIncidental non linguistic regularities learning in Children with
Gabriel, Audrey ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg; Parisse, Christophe et al

Poster (2011, July)

Recent studies on specific language impairment (SLI) have suggested that language deficits could be partly explained by the Procedural Deficit hypothesis (PDH; Ullman & Pierpont, 2005). Tomblin et al ... [more ▼]

Recent studies on specific language impairment (SLI) have suggested that language deficits could be partly explained by the Procedural Deficit hypothesis (PDH; Ullman & Pierpont, 2005). Tomblin et al. (2007) and Lum et al. (2009; 2011) obtained data supporting this interpretation with the serial reaction time (SRT) task, as well as Evans et al. (2009) and Plante et al. (2002) with artificial grammar tasks. Recently, Gabriel et al. (2011) obtained contrasting results, showing that children with SLI were able to detect non linguistic regularities during a SRT task. The aim of this study was to assess the PDH by using a non-linguistic artificial grammar learning tasks in order to mimic real conditions of language acquisition. Twenty-three children with SLI and their typically developing (TD) peers are compared on a task in which the incidental learning sequence was presented through visual shapes via a laptop.These results confirm our previous study (Gabriel et al., 2011) by showing that children with SLI detect the rules in non-linguistic conditions. • So, contrary to results of previous studies (Evans et al., 2009; Lum et al., 2009; 2011; Plante et al., 2002; Tomblin et al., 2007), this study does not confirm the PDH in children with SLI, or at least suggests that, if present, the deficit of the procedural system in SLI is not going beyond the language system. [less ▲]

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See detailF-LARSP: une adaptation francophone du LARSP. Premières données
Maillart, Christelle ULg; Parisse, Christophe; Tommerdahl, Jodi

Scientific conference (2011, June 17)

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See detailThe perceptual and verbal analogical reasoning in children with specific language impairment (SLI)
Leroy, Sandrine ULg; Guénébaud, Mélanie; Parisse, Christophe et al

Poster (2011, June)

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See detailCategorization and abstraction of construction schemas in children with specific language impairment
Leroy, Sandrine ULg; Duquet, Adèle ULg; Parisse, Christophe et al

Poster (2010, September 10)

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See detailLinking abstract form and grammatical function : a construction-grammar experiment
Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULg

Poster (2010, September 09)

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