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See detailBovine Herpesvirus 4 Modulates Its beta-1,6-N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase Activity through Alternative Splicing.
Lété, Céline ULg; Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas; Machiels, Bénédicte ULg et al

in Journal of virology (2016), 90(4), 2039-51

Carbohydrates play major roles in host-virus interactions. It is therefore not surprising that, during coevolution with their hosts, viruses have developed sophisticated mechanisms to hijack for their ... [more ▼]

Carbohydrates play major roles in host-virus interactions. It is therefore not surprising that, during coevolution with their hosts, viruses have developed sophisticated mechanisms to hijack for their profit different pathways of glycan synthesis. Thus, the Bo17 gene of Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) encodes a homologue of the cellular core 2 protein beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-mucin type (C2GnT-M), which is a key player for the synthesis of complex O-glycans. Surprisingly, we show in this study that, as opposed to what is observed for the cellular enzyme, two different mRNAs are encoded by the Bo17 gene of all available BoHV-4 strains. While the first one corresponds to the entire coding sequence of the Bo17 gene, the second results from the splicing of a 138-bp intron encoding critical residues of the enzyme. Antibodies generated against the Bo17 C terminus showed that the two forms of Bo17 are expressed in BoHV-4 infected cells, but enzymatic assays revealed that the spliced form is not active. In order to reveal the function of these two forms, we then generated recombinant strains expressing only the long or the short form of Bo17. Although we did not highlight replication differences between these strains, glycomic analyses and lectin neutralization assays confirmed that the splicing of the Bo17 gene gives the potential to BoHV-4 to fine-tune the global level of core 2 branching activity in the infected cell. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of new mechanisms to regulate the activity of glycosyltransferases from the Golgi apparatus. IMPORTANCE: Viruses are masters of adaptation that hijack cellular pathways to allow their growth. Glycans play a central role in many biological processes, and several studies have highlighted mechanisms by which viruses can affect glycosylation. Glycan synthesis is a nontemplate process regulated by the availability of key glycosyltransferases. Interestingly, bovine herpesvirus 4 encodes one such enzyme which is a key enzyme for the synthesis of complex O-glycans. In this study, we show that, in contrast to cellular homologues, this virus has evolved to alternatively express two proteins from this gene. While the first one is enzymatically active, the second results from the alternative splicing of the region encoding the catalytic site of the enzyme. We postulate that this regulatory mechanism could allow the virus to modulate the synthesis of some particular glycans for function at the location and/or the moment of infection. [less ▲]

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See detailSHIP-1 inhibits CD95/APO-1/Fas-induced apoptosis in primary T lymphocytes and T leukemic cells by promoting CD95 glycosylation independently of its phosphatase activity
Charlier, Edith ULg; Condé, Claude ULg; Zhang, Jing et al

in Leukemia : Official Journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K (2010)

SHIP-1 functions as a negative regulator of immune responses by hydrolyzing phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate generated by PI 3-kinase activity. As a result, SHIP-1 deficiency in mice results in ... [more ▼]

SHIP-1 functions as a negative regulator of immune responses by hydrolyzing phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate generated by PI 3-kinase activity. As a result, SHIP-1 deficiency in mice results in myeloproliferation and B cell lymphoma. On the other hand, SHIP-1 deficient mice have a reduced T cell population, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In this work, we hypothesized that SHIP-1 plays anti-apoptotic functions in T cells upon stimulation of the death receptor CD95/APO-1/Fas. Using primary T cells from SHIP-1-/- mice and T leukemic cell lines, we report here that SHIP-1 is a potent inhibitor of CD95-induced death. We observed that a small fraction of the SHIP-1 pool is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum where it promotes CD95 glycosylation. This post-translational modification requires an intact SH2 domain of SHIP-1, but is independent of its phosphatase activity. The glycosylated CD95 fails to oligomerize upon stimulation, resulting in impaired DISC formation and downstream apoptotic cascade. These results uncover an unanticipated inhibitory function for SHIP-1 and emphasize the role of glycosylation in the regulation of CD95 signaling in T cells. This work may also provide a new basis for therapeutic strategies using compounds inducing apoptosis through the CD95 pathway on SHIP-1 negative leukemic T cells. [less ▲]

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