References of "Pain, R. H"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTem-1 Beta-Lactamase Folds in a Nonhierarchical Manner with Transient Non-Native Interactions Involving the C-Terminal Region
Lejeune, Annabelle ULg; Pain, R. H.; Charlier, Paulette ULg et al

in Biochemistry (2008), 47(4), 1186-93

The conformational stability and kinetics of refolding and unfolding of the W290F mutant of TEM-1 beta-lactamase have been determined as a function of guanidinium chloride concentration. The activity and ... [more ▼]

The conformational stability and kinetics of refolding and unfolding of the W290F mutant of TEM-1 beta-lactamase have been determined as a function of guanidinium chloride concentration. The activity and spectroscopic properties of the mutant enzyme did not differ significantly from those of the wild type, indicating that the mutation has only a very limited effect on the structure of the protein. The stability of the folded protein is reduced, however, by 5-10 kJ mol-1 relative to that of the molten globule intermediate (H), but the values of the folding rate constants are unchanged, suggesting that Trp-290 becomes organized in its nativelike environment only after the rate-limiting step; i.e., the C-terminal region of the enzyme folds very late. In contrast to the significant increase in fluorescence intensity seen in the dead time (3-4 ms) of refolding of the wild-type protein, no corresponding burst phase was observed with the mutant enzyme, enabling the burst phase to be attributed specifically to the C-terminal Trp-290. This residue is suggested to be buried in a nonpolar environment from which it has to escape during subsequent folding steps. With both proteins, fast early collapse leads to a folding intermediate in which the C-terminal region of the polypeptide chain is trapped in a non-native structure, consistent with a nonhierarchical folding process. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (24 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailQuantitative Analysis of the Stabilization by Substrate of Staphylococcus Aureus Pc1 Beta-Lactamase
Lejeune, Annabelle ULg; Vanhove, Marc; Lamotte-Brasseur, Josette et al

in Chemistry & Biology (2001), 8(8), 831-42

BACKGROUND: The stabilization of enzymes in the presence of substrates has been recognized for a long time. Quantitative information regarding this phenomenon is, however, rather scarce since the enzyme ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The stabilization of enzymes in the presence of substrates has been recognized for a long time. Quantitative information regarding this phenomenon is, however, rather scarce since the enzyme destroys the potential stabilizing agent during the course of the experiments. In this work, enzyme unfolding was followed by monitoring the progressive decrease of the rate of substrate utilization by the Staphylococcus aureus PC1 beta-lactamase, at temperatures above the melting point of the enzyme. RESULTS: Enzyme inactivation was directly followed by spectrophotometric measurements. In the presence of substrate concentrations above the K(m) values, significant stabilization was observed with all tested compounds. A combination of unfolding kinetic measurements and enzymatic studies, both under steady-state and non-steady-state regimes, allowed most of the parameters characteristic of the two concurrent phenomena (i.e. substrate hydrolysis and enzyme denaturation) to be evaluated. In addition, molecular modelling studies show a good correlation between the extent of stabilization, and the magnitude of the energies of interaction with the enzyme. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis indicates that the enzyme is substantially stabilized towards heat-induced denaturation, independently of the relative proportions of non-covalent Henri-Michaelis complex (ES) and acyl-enzyme adduct (ES*). Thus, for those substrates with which the two catalytic intermediates are expected to be significantly populated, both species (ES and ES*) appear to be similarly stabilized. This analysis contributes a new quantitative approach to the problem. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA collapsed intermediate with nonnative packing of hydrophobic residues in the folding of TEM-1 beta-lactamase
Vanhove, M.; Lejeune, Annabelle ULg; GUILLAUME, G. et al

in Biochemistry (1998), 37(7), 1941-1950

The kinetics of refolding of TEM-1 beta-lactamase from solution in guanidine hydrochloride have been investigated on the manual and stopped-flow mixing time scales. The kinetics of change of far-UV ... [more ▼]

The kinetics of refolding of TEM-1 beta-lactamase from solution in guanidine hydrochloride have been investigated on the manual and stopped-flow mixing time scales. The kinetics of change of far-UV circular dichroism and of intrinsic and ANS fluorescence have been compared with changes in the quenching of fluorescence by acrylamide as a probe of the accessibility of solvent to tryptophan. The binding of ANS points to hydrophobic collapse in the very early stages of folding which take place in the burst phase. This is accompanied by regain of 60-65% of-native ellipticity, indicating formation of a significant proportion of secondary structure, Also in the burst phase, the tryptophan residues, which are largely exposed to solvent in the native protein, become less accessible to acrylamide, and the intrinsic fluorescence increases markedly. An early intermediate is thus formed in which tryptophan is more buried than in the native protein. Further intermediates are formed over the next 20 s. Quenching by acrylamide increases during this period, as the transient nonnative state is disrupted and the tryptophan residue(s) become(s) reexposed to solvent, The two slowest phases are determined by the isomerization of incorrect prolyl isomers, but double jump tryptophan fluorescence and acrylamide quenching experiments show little, if any, effect of proline isomerization on the earlier phases, Hydrophobic collapse thus occurs to a folding intermediate in which there is a nonnative element of structure which has to rearrange in the later steps of folding, resulting in a nonhierarchical folding pathway. The C-terminal W290 is suggested as being involved in the nonnative intermediate. beta-Lactamase provides further evidence for the occurrence of nonnative intermediates in protein folding. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailbeta-lactamases as models for protein-folding studies
Vanhove, M.; Lejeune, Annabelle ULg; Pain, R. H.

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (1998), 54(4), 372-377

This review traces some of the key features of the folding of beta-lactamases and their relevance to the way proteins fold in general. Studies on the enzymes have highlighted the nature and role of ... [more ▼]

This review traces some of the key features of the folding of beta-lactamases and their relevance to the way proteins fold in general. Studies on the enzymes have highlighted the nature and role of equilibrium and transient condensed states. The kinetics of folding are multiphasic, and when monitored by acrylamide quenching of the tryptophan fluorescence, an early phase provides evidence for the transient accumulation of a nonnative intermediate involving burial of tryptophan in a nonpolar environment. Intermediate phases can be understood in terms of progressive folding of different parts of the molecule. The later, slow phases are associated with proline isomerization in the TEM-1 enzyme and, in its P167T mutant form, with isomerization from trans to cis of the E166 T167 peptide bond. Coupled with kinetic and X-ray crystallographic studies of the beta-lactamase from Staphylococcus aureus and its D179Q mutant, it appears that the final stage of folding is that of collapse and packing of the Omega-loop on to the main body of the protein. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (4 ULg)