References of "Pagnoulle, Christine"
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See detailTraduire August Wilson: voix africaines américaines en français
Bada, Valérie ULg; Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

Scientific conference (2016, December 09)

Les rythmes syntaxiques and intonatifs ainsi que la langue allitérative et anaphorique propres à la poétique wilsonienne sont autant de complexités de traduction. Le présent article décrit les difficultés ... [more ▼]

Les rythmes syntaxiques and intonatifs ainsi que la langue allitérative et anaphorique propres à la poétique wilsonienne sont autant de complexités de traduction. Le présent article décrit les difficultés des traductrices à créer une langue en français qui respecte le rythme ainsi que la référentialité multiple du texte. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the Kamau Trail: Tracking Poems from Page to Stage
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

in Collier, Gordon; Davis, Geoffrey; Delrez, Marc (Eds.) et al The Cross-cultural Legacy. Critical and Creative Writing in Memory of Hena Maes-Jelinek (2016)

This chapter traces my involvement in Brathwaite's poetry over thirty years and how it eventually resulted in a play in French staged in both metropolitan France and the Caribbean.

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See detail"Translating Multilayered Sensory Experience"
Bada, Valérie ULg; Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

in Palimpsestes (2016), 29

The powerful impact of the plays by African American playwright August Wilson largely relies on the way his words appeal to the senses, whether explicitly by calling upon the characters’ sensory ... [more ▼]

The powerful impact of the plays by African American playwright August Wilson largely relies on the way his words appeal to the senses, whether explicitly by calling upon the characters’ sensory experience or more indirectly through his use of syntactic rhythm, or indeed his specific modulation of AAVE. This article describes how the translators tried to create a French idiom that induces the same sensory impact on an audience and, at the same time, reflects the multilayered referentiality of the text. [less ▲]

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See detailEstonia
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

Book published by Les Impressions nouvelles (2016)

Havelange's book consists of twenty-four texts loosely based on photographs by his friend Alexandre Christiaens that alternate discussions on the very nature of photography and specific episodes, whether ... [more ▼]

Havelange's book consists of twenty-four texts loosely based on photographs by his friend Alexandre Christiaens that alternate discussions on the very nature of photography and specific episodes, whether a local instance of young man taking his parents to a well-known photographer at the end of the 19th century or grim contemporary scenes located in Estonia. [less ▲]

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See detailMine de rien
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

in The Savannah Review (2015), 5

This short article mainly consists of the translation of three pieces that were published after Damas' death, with an introduction and comments in collaboraton with Kathleen Gyssels (UA).

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See detailBrathwaite's DreamHaiti: Translating Ethnicity
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

in European Journal of English Studies (2014), 18(3), 330-338

While commenting on the specific difficulties in translating Brathwaite's idiosyncratic English, the paper points to obvious objections to the use of the distancing word 'ethnicity'.

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See detailSounds and Senses: French echoes of Desmond Graham's Clipped Lines
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

Conference (2014, September 17)

Desmond Graham, a poet from Newcatle-upon-Tyne, has come to use short lines without punctuation, relying on line breaks to bring out (or sometimes further confuse) what meaning his verse may have. Next to ... [more ▼]

Desmond Graham, a poet from Newcatle-upon-Tyne, has come to use short lines without punctuation, relying on line breaks to bring out (or sometimes further confuse) what meaning his verse may have. Next to a 'sharp ear for the punctuation potential that lies in line endings', he has trained an awareness of 'the potential for ambiguity offered when sentences in English have no punctuation until the end'. He also stresses how sounds – alliterations, assonances – contribute to weaving words together. The apparently conversational register and the attention paid to sounds are fully relevant to the topic of the conference; ambiguity is not but it is intrincably part of Graham's mode of writing. The task of the translator is predictably challenging. [less ▲]

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See detailTraduire Seamus Heaney
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

Conference (2014, September 13)

I propose to briefly explain how I came to translate some of Heaney's poems into French and to comment on my approach, starting from formally rather different pieces.

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See detailPoètes liégeois
Purnelle, Gérald ULg; Andreux, Marie-Louise; Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

in Visions International (2014), 89(2014), 33

Poems by nineteen Liege writers, three of them now dead, translated into English and beautifully illustrated.

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See detailContinuities in Kamau Brathwaite's Latest Published Collection Eleggas
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

Conference (2013, August 05)

Continuity is a key word in Brathwaite’s work, especially after the ‘Rift Years’ of his first ‘Salt period’ at the end of the 1980s. Whatever the publishing format, even in interviews, Brathwaite’s ... [more ▼]

Continuity is a key word in Brathwaite’s work, especially after the ‘Rift Years’ of his first ‘Salt period’ at the end of the 1980s. Whatever the publishing format, even in interviews, Brathwaite’s writing can no longer be divided into verse and prose, poems and essays. It runs as one powerful and tumultuous river, including lyrical and reflexive moments, fluctuating between the syncopated rhythm of jazz and the halting flow of a breathless prose. Re-using former poems is part of an almost manic strategy of incorporation, which also includes mythological and literary references, and working on multiple meanings and on porte-manteau words. I propose to examine the versatility of forms in his latest collection, Eleg guas (Wesleyan UP, 2010). Bringing various elements together begins with the title of the collection, which consists of ten chapters, three of which are differently laid-out excerpts from his elegy to his first wife, The Zea Mexican Diary (1987). Other sections are re-cycled from earlier collections such as ‘Poem for Walter Rodney’ (from Third World Poems), ‘Stone’ (from Middle Passages), ‘Défilée’ and ‘Ark’ (from Born to Slow Horses). However, they are never reproduced as such, they have been slightly or radically changed, and tracing such changes will be part of my enquiry. The last chapter but one is dedicated to the sea, to Yemanjaa, to Sycorax, to a ‘simple woman’, who beyond the violence of the Middle Passage presides over a gentle reconciliation under the sign of love and seals, also in the combination of languages, another recurrent continuity in Brathwaite’s work, that between Africa and the Caribbean. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Négraille’s Testament: Translating Black-Label
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg; Gyssels, Kathleen

in Batchelor, Kathrin; Bisdorff, Claire (Eds.) Intimate Enemies: Translation in Francophone contexts (2013)

The present article discusses issues raised in the translation into English of this major long poem by one of the founders of the Negritude movement: it explores the sense of uncertainty that pervades it ... [more ▼]

The present article discusses issues raised in the translation into English of this major long poem by one of the founders of the Negritude movement: it explores the sense of uncertainty that pervades it and comments on effect of Caribbean references, the rhythmic significance of repetitions and enumerations, departures from standard language and the difficulties related to rhyming lines and idiomatic phrases. [less ▲]

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See detailRazziaed memories, proud re-membering: Africa in Damas and Brathwaite
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

Conference (2013, March 21)

“Razziaed memories, proud re-membering: Africa in poems by Léon Gontran Damas and Kamau Brathwaite” To poets and artists in the Caribbean Africa is always present, often with two opposed connotations – ... [more ▼]

“Razziaed memories, proud re-membering: Africa in poems by Léon Gontran Damas and Kamau Brathwaite” To poets and artists in the Caribbean Africa is always present, often with two opposed connotations – the violence of the slave-trade on the one hand and the mythic home country that functions as a source of pride on the other. The second celebratory approach is obvious at the very root of the Negritude movement (and for instance in the repeated statement by Damas ‘Le Blanc à l’École du Nègre’) or in Brathwaite’s writing about the circle as an image of harmonious communal living (‘the world was round and we the spices in it’) as opposed to the straight line (‘and they brought sticks rods roads bullets straight objects’), and his reference to Yoruba figures such as Sh/Xango, Legba/Eleggua or Yemanjaa/Sycorax. While focusing on poems and passages that are branded by the scars of destruction and the memory of brutal transportation I will also briefly discuss evidence of deep-rooted pride. [less ▲]

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See detailRêvHaïti
Brathwaite, Kamau; Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

Book published by Mémoire d'encrier (2013)

This long poem is a multilayered scream against dispossession.

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See detailHistory of English Literature, Part II
Delrez, Marc ULg; Michel-Michot, Paulette ULg; Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

Learning material (2013)

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See detailRose-Marie François : des mots et des langues
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

Book published by L3 (2012)

The book brings together thirteen texts commenting on various aspects of Rose-Marie François' work as a poet, whether in actual collections or in novels. The essays move from a personal biographical ... [more ▼]

The book brings together thirteen texts commenting on various aspects of Rose-Marie François' work as a poet, whether in actual collections or in novels. The essays move from a personal biographical approach to more academic analyses of motifs or prosodic forms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (3 ULg)
See detailTraduire les droits
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

Book published by L3 (2012)

This book brings together ten contributions in French on various aspects oflegal translation, bridging not only languages but legal systems and within the same systems different cultual approaches.

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See detailTrois poètes de Dundee
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

in Journal des Poètes (2012), 2

Il s'agit de présenter l'œuvre poétiques de trois écrivains liés à la ville côtière écossaise de Dundee, et cela essentiellement par des traductions.

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See detailPast into Future: Cyprus' Undivided Literature - AydIn Mehmet Ali and Stephanos Stephanides
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

in Kunapipi : Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2012), 33(1-2), 202-214

The present article examines poems by Stephanides and short stories by Mehmet Ali (of Greek and Turkish origins respectively, as their names indicate), bringing out a common sensibility to loss and ... [more ▼]

The present article examines poems by Stephanides and short stories by Mehmet Ali (of Greek and Turkish origins respectively, as their names indicate), bringing out a common sensibility to loss and yearning for reconciliation. In keeping with what is brought out throughout this remarkable double issue edited by Anne Collett it stresses the underlying unity in hte island's literature. [less ▲]

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See detailParadoxes de l'étrange et du familier: deux traductions
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

Conference (2011, October 15)

Two recently translated poems seem to tie in with the topic of the conference through the very contrast in their respective difficulty. We have on the one hand a Scottish ballad on the clearances ... [more ▼]

Two recently translated poems seem to tie in with the topic of the conference through the very contrast in their respective difficulty. We have on the one hand a Scottish ballad on the clearances resulting from the enclosure movement, and on the other a poem by French Guyanese author Léon-G. Damas, Black-Label, translated into English. The ballad entitled ‘Glen Quaich’ is actually a contemporary piece of work but devised on a traditional form and using a local dialect. Damas’ poem includes terms that specifically relate to the Caribbean and plays on well-known nursery rhymes. The paradox lies in the fact that the Caribbean text is easier to translate than the ballad, which raises a number of almost unanswerable questions such as the extent to which the translator should try and transpose dialectical forms. [less ▲]

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See detailQuelques Considérations sur la traduction militante
Pagnoulle, Christine ULg

in D'Amelio, Nadia; Hewson, Lance (Eds.) J'ai dit la 'traductologie' sans que j'en susse rien. Hommages à Jean-René Ladmiral (2011)

The paper articulates general comments based on an extensive practice of translating for such associations as ATTAC or CADTM; it also shows weaknesses in some of the official website translations.

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (10 ULg)